3D printed CO2 diffuser

Discussion in 'General Planted Tank Discussions' started by Jack12, 21 Aug 2014.

  1. Jack12

    Jack12 Member

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    165
    saw 3D printer the other day molding away complicated plastic shapes. Its quite fascinating.

    Anybody have idea in mind as to what would be an ideal design for the most efficient co2 diffuser which wouldn't slow down flow, have a near perfect CO2 disolve rate, quick and easy maintenace?

    best position for such diffuser - attach it to inflow or outflow?

    maybe a design that you can put inside one of the compartments in external filter for easy access and maintenance?

    Anybody has CAD software experience?
     
  2. pepedopolous

    pepedopolous Member

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    689
    Location:
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Wouldn't it be cool if the diffuser could screw directly onto the filter outlet/inlet? I really don't trust the locking nuts on Up in-line atomisers.

    I think it would be very difficult to make a standalone unit that can be put in an external filter as they have to be watertight.
     
  3. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    2,819
    One of the project engineers at work is making one. From what i've heard the resolution is not that great yet and would need final machining to be watertight. A few more years things should be much better.
    I like your thinking, endless possibilities. You could use a fluval disc ceramic and modify a quick lock tap. Much harder to make one to be fitted into a filter, maybe a canister extension would be an option but its another potential leak.
     
  4. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    Hey guys this is an interesting subject. I work as a rapid prototype technician and I have done for 8 years and it was just the other day that I was thinking this. I also have two home built 3d printers at home and access two 6 sla machines and two sls machines at work and as such 3d printing is my second hobby/career and any advice I am more than happy to help.
    Andy
     
    dean likes this.
  5. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll fire a couple of questions at you Andy
    What sort of tolerances can these printers work to?
    Whas sort of surface finish can they produce?
    If you printed a cup would it hold water?and smaller scale 12mm dia with a 1.5mm wall is that still watertight?
    How strong are the printed components?
    What things have you printed and what was the first item you printed?[DOUBLEPOST=1408726031][/DOUBLEPOST]Any pics?
     
  6. Alje

    Alje Member

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    The only question I have is why bother ?
     
  7. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    2,819
    Our lass asks the same about planted tanks.
     
    X3NiTH likes this.
  8. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    Hello. My home printers can produce within +/- 0.1mm its not high tolerances but good enough for my uses.The ones I use at work are similar tolerance but better definition due to lasers as apposed to fdm extruder. Most prints have a good surface quality but as with any layered process build lines etc will be present but can easily be removed with sanding etc. I have printed several ornate vase's with a single wall thikness of 0.5mm and its still water tight and I see no reason that a 12mm dia and 1.5 mm wall would not be water tight. The components I print are made from PLA as its the easiest thermo plastic to use athough not good with heat it is very tough and as for strength it would all depend on how dense it was printed. Many different materials are available for example ABS and nylon making componenets comparable to injection moulding. My first print would have been calibration componenets cubes and 100mm crosses for fine tuning but after that it was a bust of yoda I think. a6b52934b26d859627bb089d089adfb1.jpg
    Collection of objects
    I 8805a63e7c3748027e20856f44d05ab2.jpg
    Ogre printed in sections
    9075cecf9582b06d42a9f93be433e07d.jpg
    Golem LOTR
    1cd196643b8be12ebb75ac62137d1079.jpg
    World Cup
    3a520c6c7feb9795bba36448d1dc116e.jpg
    His and hers owls
    Just an exmlample oh things I have done.
     
  9. Jack12

    Jack12 Member

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    This is fantastic work Andy. Would be awesome if u give it a try with the diffuser and share your experience with us! Maybe a very fine plastic mesh placed inside a cylinder shaped container attached to outlet will do a trick for a cheap effective, disposable diffuser?
     
    kirk likes this.
  10. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    Thanks jack12 .I will have to come up with a design and go from there :) your idea is similar to what i had in mind. If anyone else has ideas then feel free to add. A Larger collection of ideas will be a benefit :)
    Thanks
    Andy
     
  11. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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  12. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    I will take a look thanks :) i have not had much success with the diffuser but may be this is achievable! :)
     
  13. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    You could make a holder for a fluval disc ceramic or maybe a body for the new up inline ceramic. I think you would need a much higher resolution to print a plastic diffuser but i think making improved cases/housings is possible but might need final machining to be watertight where components meet
     
  14. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    These look pretty cool
     
    Greenfinger2 likes this.
  15. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    I like your idea of making some new housing. I broke my inline diffuser only the other day. Z corp printers are pretty cool but the components i have seen are not that durable and would be not be water tight. They are great for visual models but not convinced on how good they would be as a working model. On the other hand my home 3D printer is not fantastic and i have only made a handfull of water tight parts for examply some vases and a 16mm to 13mm filter pipe reducer.im sure the diffuser can be achieved :)
     
  16. Greenfinger2

    Greenfinger2 Member

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    4,198
    Location:
    Enfield London
    Wow that printer is amazing :cool:
     
  17. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    I did think that about the z corp components usability, even more so when I saw them coat the model
    The housing for the inline should be achievable but i think you will have to tap/cut the threads. remember these things run at 2-3bar pressure.
    I'm not 100% convinced about the strength. Co2 attacks some rubbers and possibly plastics too. you wouldn't want it to explode and dump the contents of your tank all over the floor
    However I am interested to see how you get on, any problems you may or may not encounter and to proved wrong on the strength factor.
    Good luck
     
    jolt100 likes this.
  18. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    just to dig an old thread up. A quick question Andy. what sort of file formats can you print? I'm just getting going with solidworks can you print the 3d parts I can draw? could I help this project in any way?
     
    Greenfinger2 likes this.
  19. r32syd

    r32syd Member

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    Hello mate. You almost certainly can help. Unfortunately i have recently moved home and have not set up my printer yet but I will with time. I have to use .stl only. Let me know what you come up with :)
     
    Andy Thurston and Greenfinger2 like this.
  20. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    cool! I just need to figure out how to export/convert into that format then.
    Do I need add anything to my models for the printer to start from?
    the potential for this is massive, reactor parts, inline diffuser cases etc.
    the advantage of solidworks is I can change dimensions to suit the printing process in minutes, even assemble parts on screen and see how they will fit together and see potential problems before they happen
     

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