Advice on Soft vs Hard Water and pH Shock

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Hello! I'm a first time poster, having set up my first aquarium as an adult (last one I had was 20 years ago with my dad), and of course having some problems. I hope this is the right subforum!

I've been researching the tank I wanted for a while, all the plants, fish, etc so I thought I had everything down but of course I was wrong...

I have a 60L quite heavily planted tank, with an organic topsoil base, then a sand cap and a few large round stones.

I researched quite a lot and realised I really loved the South American fish the most, and as I have a good source rain water (big tanks coming off our greenhouses at home + alotment) I decided to use that. I live in London so otherwise I thought the water would be too hard for the plants + fish. My water details (using API master test kit)

Rainwater - pH 6.6 Am 0.25 Ni 0 Na 0 GH 4 drops KH 4 drops
Tapwater - pH 7.8 Am 0.4 Ni 0 Na 0 GH 12+ drops/215 ppm KH 9 drops/9 degrees /161.1ppm

The first 3 weeks went great, the aquarium cycled surprisingly quickly and this weekend I bought my first fish - 10 neon green rasboras, 4 amano shrimp and 1 nerite. Because of the plants I have zero nitrates (over the cycle the nitrates spikedand then would go down quite quickly) I floated them in the bag for 30 minutes, then used a big syringe to take out the bag water and add in some tank water over 2 hours to acclimate them. I tested the bag water which was about 8.0, which I now think is the problem - the animals got pH shock. Some of the fish had slightly ragged fins which I noticed when we got home, but I don't think if they have fin rot that this would kill them off so quickly.

Over evening and next morning 2 of the fish died, and the rest looked unhappy so in a panic I researched, decided it was probably pH shock and bought a small quarantine tank (while doing this 2 more died). I added mostly tap water (w/ conditioner), a bit of tank water and have been planning on changing a bit of water each day to the quarantine tank over a week until the pHs are almost the same. Sadly I only have 2 left. I didn't move the amanos over as they were doing things apparently happily, but now 1 of them has died. I did add some tap water to the tank so the pH of the tank is currently 7 to hopefully make their shock a bit less.

As you can see I cocked this up a bit, and I don't want to kill everything off again. I think I have 2 options (if my pH shock theory is right, please let me know if you think it could be something else!) - either quarantine all fish for a week starting with tap and going over to soft tank water (I've called all the local shops and they all seem to use tap for their tropical fish), OR just start using tap in the tank and forget the rainwater. I really want my plants to continue to thrive, and to have some kuhli loaches and german rams, which I read wanted a low pH, but I would love some advice on what everyone else thinks.

I've also noticed in the last few days that some of the plants have stopped growing (before they went mad) and I think I need to dose with iron/magnesium/phospate. Would I still need to dose if I used the tap water?

I attached a photo from during my last water change before the carnage - it's much less yellow IRL but my phone is a bit crap.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20200713_172627_1.jpg
    IMG_20200713_172627_1.jpg
    485.9 KB · Views: 39

Majsa

Member
Joined
26 Apr 2017
Messages
240
Location
The Netherlands
Welcome to the forum! I am sorry to hear about the losses. My first post on the forum was very similar, I bought a shoal of microdevario kubotais and they started dying one by one within hours. I acclimatised them the same way as you and they too had ragged fins. In the end I suspect they caught columnaris, which was triggered by the long period in the bag. I called the LFS and in the end they gave me a new, smaller group (once things had settled again).

Quarantining fish is never a bad idea, and I now prefer to keep the acclimatisation rather short and use a container or a bucket (out of the bag as soon as it is opened) where the fish have more space and rest. Some people just plop and drop. I don't think the PH is as important as ammonia etc. You mention the bag had a ph of 8 - it could be that there was NH3 present, which is toxic to fish.

I also think you may have introduced too many fish in one go in a 60L tank.
The tank is just 3 weeks old, maybe not stable enough yet? I'd start with the amanos, and introduce the fish later.

With neon green rasboras you mean microdevario kubotai? My experience is that they do not travel well and come with issues, but once they are acclimatised they are great fish. I have ±35 swimming now, after the bad experiences I really had to breed my own (they are one year old now, from one spawn).
 

sparkyweasel

Member
Joined
30 Jun 2011
Messages
1,504
What were your water values, in terms of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and ph, when you introduced the fish? I also think you may have introduced too many fish in one go in a 60L tank.
I think that's it. Did you do any water tests after introducing the fish? It could have been an ammonia or nitrite spike from adding a lot of fish at once.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
What were your water values, in terms of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and ph, when you introduced the fish? I also think you may have introduced too many fish in one go in a 60L tank.
All three were at 0. 3 days before I spiked the aquarium with 4ppm ammonia and within 24 hours ammonia and nitrate were at 0, and nitrite was at 20. Then 24 hours later the nitrate was at 0 too.

I thought that since I had cycled with a larger amount of ammonia that amount of fish was fine. I've checked the levels every day (and on the first day twice after I added fish) and they have always been at 0.

Looking back I think I should've just got the amanos! I'll stock less fish at a time. Should I just do 5 or 6 small schooling fish at a time?
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Welcome to the forum! I am sorry to hear about the losses. My first post on the forum was very similar, I bought a shoal of microdevario kubotais and they started dying one by one within hours. I acclimatised them the same way as you and they too had ragged fins. In the end I suspect they caught columnaris, which was triggered by the long period in the bag. I called the LFS and in the end they gave me a new, smaller group (once things had settled again).

Quarantining fish is never a bad idea, and I now prefer to keep the acclimatisation rather short and use a container or a bucket (out of the bag as soon as it is opened) where the fish have more space and rest. Some people just plop and drop. I don't think the PH is as important as ammonia etc. You mention the bag had a ph of 8 - it could be that there was NH3 present, which is toxic to fish.


The tank is just 3 weeks old, maybe not stable enough yet? I'd start with the amanos, and introduce the fish later.

With neon green rasboras you mean microdevario kubotai? My experience is that they do not travel well and come with issues, but once they are acclimatised they are great fish. I have ±35 swimming now, after the bad experiences I really had to breed my own (they are one year old now, from one spawn).

Alas, I think I'm going to end up with just the amanos if I'm lucky!

Do you think it might not be pH then? I did wonder with the slightly dodgy fins, but most of them had fine fins and I'm down to only 2 now (I'd say 3 or 4 had slightly off fins, and those ones seemed to go first). I have been dosing the quarantine tank with melafix too just in case. If it was columnaris, wouldn't the amanos have been fine? One of them died too :(

They weren't in the bag long, just the 30 car ride home, then 30 mins floating, then I started changing the water. Is your tank pH very different from your tank water? That's what I'm most nervous about. I will try the bucket and drip method next time (as well as possibly quarantining and slowly changing the water). When they were dying they would just swim in place and move as little as possible, then they stopped being able to swim properly and would swim upside down and be swept around for an hour or two :( If it was a disease, why would they die so quickly after I got them home when they seem fine at the shop?

I'll definitely wait a while longer before adding anything else, if not just to feel a bit less sad about the poor fish!! Also, probably will go to a different fish shop.

I wondered about that as @shangman said South American fish. Maybe Green Neon Tetras?

Yes they were microdevario kubotai. I was going to get some small tetras, but they were so lovely I thought I'd get them instead (and I had researched them as well and saw that their pH needs were similar, I made a massive exel file to see which would work together like that) Alas, might try some tetras next time instead, and leave the raboras for a few years.


I think that's it. Did you do any water tests after introducing the fish? It could have been an ammonia or nitrite spike from adding a lot of fish at once.

I've checked this a lot and it's always at 0 for all three. The plants have been growing a lot and seem to suck everything up immediately, although it definitely is cycled.

How many fish would you recommend I add at a time with a 60L? Also, how long do you recommend I wait in between? I will definitely be waiting a few weeks between this and my next venture.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
All three were at 0. 3 days before I spiked the aquarium with 4ppm ammonia and within 24 hours ammonia and nitrate were at 0, and nitrite was at 20. Then 24 hours later the nitrate was at 0 too.

I thought that since I had cycled with a larger amount of ammonia that amount of fish was fine. I've checked the levels every day (and on the first day twice after I added fish) and they have always been at 0.

Looking back I think I should've just got the amanos! I'll stock less fish at a time. Should I just do 5 or 6 small schooling fish at a time?

Whoops, wrote this wrong. within 24 hours ammonia and nitrite** were at 0, and nitrate and 20. Then 24 hours later the nitrate was at 0 too.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
So do you guys think that it was a spike in ammonia/nitrite, more likely than pH shock? Maybe I was too hasty and should've waited another week or two despite the values looking 'right' to let things settle.

Is the pH shock less of a thing than I thought, and that acclimatising my fish to the water that's 1 - 1.4pH different to most London fish shop's water over a week isn't worth it? If not I will keep my low pH water. Thought I guess that quarantining is good practice anyway.

I want to make sure I don't accidentally kill the next fish or shrimps. I'll wait 2 weeks before I think about adding more. Does anyone suggest a more hardy nano fish, or other things I can do to make sure that everything is ok?
 

Nick72

Member
Joined
21 Apr 2020
Messages
283
Location
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Firstly, your tap water is fine. I would not bother with rain water.

You will need to add a water conditioner, I would suggest Prime, every time you add tap water to your aquarium, but apart from that no worries.

PH 7.8, GH12, KH 9 is fine for 90% of plants and fish.

Just focus on making sure you are fully cycled.

Test for Ammonia, Nitrite and Nitrates every day until things settle down. Then test once a week. Eventually everything will be running fine and you can stop testing unless you have a specific issue or concern.

You do not have enough plant mass to consume 20ppm Nitrate in 24hrs - it's physically impossible, so there is something up there. To be clear you don't have anywhere near enough plant mass to consume 20ppm Nitrate within a week, so this simply did not happen.

Keep testing your water until you fully understand what's going on.

You've either lost your cycle or it's just not strong enough for the bio-load you added.

Focus on keeping your two remaining fish alive over the next two weeks, then maybe you can start adding more.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Firstly, your tap water is fine. I would not bother with rain water.

You will need to add a water conditioner, I would suggest Prime, every time you add tap water to your aquarium, but apart from that no worries.

PH 7.8, GH12, KH 9 is fine for 90% of plants and fish.

Just focus on making sure you are fully cycled.

Test for Ammonia, Nitrite and Nitrates every day until things settle down. Then test once a week. Eventually everything will be running fine and you can stop testing unless you have a specific issue or concern.

You do not have enough plant mass to consume 20ppm Nitrate in 24hrs - it's physically impossible, so there is something up there. To be clear you don't have anywhere near enough plant mass to consume 20ppm Nitrate within a week, so this simply did not happen.

Keep testing your water until you fully understand what's going on.

You've either lost your cycle or it's just not strong enough for the bio-load you added.

Focus on keeping your two remaining fish alive over the next two weeks, then maybe you can start adding more.

I have some prime bought just in case, so I will just start using that with the tap water instead, thank you!

I'll keep testing and making sure everything is down, and do water changes if anything is up (plus weekly ones). Should it be about 30% water change, or more?

The plants and nitrates thing is interesting! I wonder what happened to it all... maybe my test is broken? It says 0 atm, but I guess it could still be high secretly and that killed them? I didn't expect the nitrates to go down a lot, I thought that would happen with water changes but when it did I just assumed the plants were taking it up.

The last 2 fish seem to be alright atm, fingers crossed they make it ok.
 

dw1305

Expert
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
10,985
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
Welcome, I'm sorry to <"hear about your fish">, unfortunately many of us will have had a similar experience, but your plants are growing well, and it definitely isn't irretrievable.
All three were at 0. 3 days before I spiked the aquarium with 4ppm ammonia and within 24 hours ammonia and nitrate were at 0, and nitrite was at 20. Then 24 hours later the nitrate was at 0 too. I thought that since I had cycled with a larger amount of ammonia that amount of fish was fine. I've checked the levels every day (and on the first day twice after I added fish) and they have always been at 0.
The first 3 weeks went great, the aquarium cycled surprisingly quickly and this weekend I bought my first fish
My guess would be that this is your issue, your tank isn't "cycled" and levels of ammonia (NH3) are still toxic. There are some issues with both the <"added ammonia cycling concept"> and <"testing for nitrate">. Please read through the linked threads (and the threads linked into them, if you have time), if you don't want to there is a fairly <"ranty" summary"> on page 4. of @Miss-Pepper 's <"Bedside Aquarium"> (traditional apologies to Miss Pepper).
with an organic topsoil base
You may also have some issues from the <"organic topsoil">. Do you know what the soil was? and was it out of a bag? or from the garden?
I tested the bag water which was about 8.0, which I now think is the problem - the animals got pH shock.
and I now prefer to keep the acclimatisation rather short and use a container or a bucket (out of the bag as soon as it is opened) where the fish have more space and rest. Some people just plop and drop. I don't think the PH is as important as ammonia etc.
I do the same, and I also don't think that <"pH shock was your issue">. I'll be honest I've got a <"pretty jaundiced view"> of the advice offered by most LFS, forums (I know this is a forum) and <"sellers of aquarium supplies">.
and as I have a good source rain water
Personally I'm a <"rainwater user">.

If the choice was between London tap, rain-water or RO, it is definitely rainwater for me.

cheers Darrel
 
Last edited:

Nick72

Member
Joined
21 Apr 2020
Messages
283
Location
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
I have some prime bought just in case, so I will just start using that with the tap water instead, thank you!

I'll keep testing and making sure everything is down, and do water changes if anything is up (plus weekly ones). Should it be about 30% water change, or more?

The plants and nitrates thing is interesting! I wonder what happened to it all... maybe my test is broken? It says 0 atm, but I guess it could still be high secretly and that killed them? I didn't expect the nitrates to go down a lot, I thought that would happen with water changes but when it did I just assumed the plants were taking it up.

The last 2 fish seem to be alright atm, fingers crossed they make it ok.


It's generally recommended to do at least one 50% water change per week.

Note that you say your tap water has 0 Nitrate - please check to reconfirm this, but if true that means every 50% water change will half the amount of Nitrate in your aquarium. This is one of the main, but not the only, reasons regular water changes are essential.

I don't disagree with @dw1305 's view that rainwater is good stuff, I just feel blending water is a intermediate to expert level activity, it may be hard for you to ensure each water change matches the PH, KH, GH, of your aquarium, and in my view fluctuations are harmful. They stress fish and plants and promote algae.
 

Witcher

Member
Joined
15 Jan 2020
Messages
298
Location
London
organic topsoil base, then a sand cap

Sounds like perfect conditions for Ammonia and Hydrogen sulfide production. I personally think capping soil with sand should be avoided, gravel allows better mixing with water and better gas exchange.

How the soil below the sand looks like? Is there any yellowish discoloration visible at the glass? Can you pierce the soil with a long thin stick in few places (without fish in the tank) and see if there are any gasses released? If they smell like rotten eggs, it's H2S - even in tiny amounts it will be lethal for your fish.
 

Majsa

Member
Joined
26 Apr 2017
Messages
240
Location
The Netherlands
Do you think it might not be pH then? I did wonder with the slightly dodgy fins, but most of them had fine fins and I'm down to only 2 now (I'd say 3 or 4 had slightly off fins, and those ones seemed to go first). I have been dosing the quarantine tank with melafix too just in case. If it was columnaris, wouldn't the amanos have been fine? One of them died too :(

They weren't in the bag long, just the 30 car ride home, then 30 mins floating, then I started changing the water. Is your tank pH very different from your tank water? That's what I'm most nervous about. I will try the bucket and drip method next time (as well as possibly quarantining and slowly changing the water). When they were dying they would just swim in place and move as little as possible, then they stopped being able to swim properly and would swim upside down and be swept around for an hour or two :( If it was a disease, why would they die so quickly after I got them home when they seem fine at the shop?

This is my post from nearly 3 years ago: What's happening to my M Kubotai...?

The symptoms were pretty much the same, but the conditions were different, my tank was a few months old and had other fish in which weren't affected. I use just tap water in this tank and I think the LFS is on the same water supply. I don't know if you can draw any conclusions from my experience, but the comments in the thread can be interesting to read.

I agree with the others that the best thing is to get the conditions right in the coming weeks before adding any more fish. I guess that the fact that the amano died later in the tank points out to poor tank conditions, they are normally really hardy shrimp.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Hi all,

Welcome, I'm sorry to <"hear about your fish">, unfortunately many of us will have had a similar experience, but your plants are growing well, and it definitely isn't irretrievable.My guess would be that this is your issue, your tank isn't "cycled" and levels of ammonia (NH3) are still toxic. There are some issues with both the <"added ammonia cycling concept"> and <"testing for nitrate">. Please read through the linked threads (and the threads linked into them, if you have time), if you don't want to there is a fairly <"ranty" summary"> on page 4. of @Miss-Pepper 's <"Bedside Aquarium"> (traditional apologies to Miss Pepper).

Thank you Darrel for this advice and all of the links! I've read them all and most of the linked threads within as well. It was a bit overwhelming but I think I have the jist of it all... After reading this I think my problem is that I have let myself believe that the aquarium was cycled because the tests/numbers on the tests have been 'correct' after dosing regularly with ammonia, but that actually I needed to wait another month to let the plants and bacteria naturally grow. I was worried that because my tank now seemed 'cycled', that I needed to immediately add some animals to continue adding ammonia and not 'kill off' the bacteria which I read would happen somewhere... it seems like I could just leave it to mature for quite a while longer. I actually was planning on doing this before after reading the Diana Walstad's book, but in the excitement got a bit carried away. I thought that the testkits would show the danger in the tank, but perhaps not.

I am otherwise already following the principles you put in the Bedside aquarium thread, using garden soil + sand, using collected stones, wood and leaves, adding snails (I also failed to mention I added some 6 trumpet snails and some blackworms to the tank at the same time ... added to the bioload too though I now realise (my fish shop gave them to me for free and called them pest snails which worried me about their expertise a bit)). Really what I want to do with the tank is set up a nice little ecosystem, and the walstad method really appeals to me (though I don't mind doing regular water changes).

I am wondering.. I still have 2 fish and 2 amanos left (the fish are in the quarantine tank, the amanos in the normal tank). To help them survive, should I do a water change every day or two for 2 - 3 weeks? I am doing that in the quarantine tank already with the fish. I am also dosing the fish with melafix... should I avoid dosing the tank itself with melafix, as I'm worried that might kill some of the 'good' bacteria in the tank? I will otherwise not add anything new for a while.



In regards to the plants - some are doing amazingly, and some less so. The plants that have deep roots are doing extremely well (particularly the lotus which was planted 3 weeks ago as a bulb with 1 tiny leaf). My stem plants started out doing very well in the first 2 weeks, but in the past few days have stopped growing and the tips have started to look a bit sad. I also had some frogbit that melted away completely (everything went yellow then brown :( ). I think this might be because at first the water had nutrients from the soil in it floating about, but that's all been sucked up now. I was thinking of adding some fertiliser (Easy life - Proficko my local shop has (incidentally not the shop that sold me the fish) and seems to have the missing elements (I searched this forum last night and came across the duckweed index which I think is relevant to this)). Would that negatively affect anything? I haven't had any algae yet, but noticed that as soon as the stem plants started to slow down, that it has begun creeping in. I was going to dose it and then get some more frogbit to see if it did better this time.



You may also have some issues from the <"organic topsoil">. Do you know what the soil was? and was it out of a bag? or from the garden? I do the same, and I also don't think that <"pH shock was your issue">. I'll be honest I've got a <"pretty jaundiced view"> of the advice offered by most LFS, forums (I know this is a forum) and <"sellers of aquarium supplies">.

The top soil was Moreland Gold Organic Topsoil. In the future, would you recommend normal topsoil? My parents are avid gardeners and all of our soil is heavily enriched with home-made compost so I thought it would be too rich (though it would've had some great organisms in it as they follow a 'no-dig' method of gardening that promotes micro-organism biodiversity in the soil). I read some warnings online about soil that's too rich so thought it was best to avoid.

Personally I'm a <"rainwater user">.



If the choice was between London tap, rain-water or RO, it is definitely rainwater for me.



cheers Darrel


Why do you prefer rainwater to tap? For me it's the same easiness to use tapwater or rainwater, and if everyone agrees that the fish aren't dying because of the pH difference then I think I would rather stick with it, but it would be interesting to know why. I've been using rainwater as my dad who's a trained gardener thought it would be best with his experience of plants and ponds. It also has loads of mosquito larvae and daphnia or seed shrimp (not sure which) living in it, which I thought would be good food once the fish came in.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Thank you for all your help and suggestions!!

It's generally recommended to do at least one 50% water change per week.


Note that you say your tap water has 0 Nitrate - please check to reconfirm this, but if true that means every 50% water change will half the amount of Nitrate in your aquarium. This is one of the main, but not the only, reasons regular water changes are essential.


I don't disagree with @dw1305 's view that rainwater is good stuff, I just feel blending water is a intermediate to expert level activity, it may be hard for you to ensure each water change matches the PH, KH, GH, of your aquarium, and in my view fluctuations are harmful. They stress fish and plants and promote algae.

Oh sorry I thought it was 30% I think I might need to do more than 1 a week right now since everything's gone wrong. Would a 40% twice a week be ok for a while?

So originally I thought I'd try the sort-of walstad method (didn't want to add fish immediately, also don't think I added quite enough plants for that), where I could potentially do less water changes over time. I thought that since my nitrates had gone up, then gone down dramatically, that it was doing what her book said and they were sucking them all up so water changes werne't needed. I have done 2 waterchanges in the past week anyway (before I got the fish) as I'd dosed a lot of ammonia and even though it was at 0 I thought it wouldn't hurt. I've also done 2 30% water changes since adding the fish, and added tap water as I thought it would lessen the pH shock that I thought was the problem.

I tested the water again this morning, and once again everything is at 0,0,0. I'm going to go to my LFS tomorrow with some water and get them to test it, in case my tests are broken (although when I was officially cycling they did seem to work and showed the whole range of colours as I dosed). What I am most confused by is why the tests say 0 on everything, even though there is clearly a problem.

After reading everything here I'm planning on from now on just using the rainwater, and forgetting the tap water. When you say blending water, do you mean between rain + tap, or adding other things into the rainwater? Or do you mean that rainwaer cahnges of the seasons and I need to do things to prepare for that? The rainwater I have has a GH+KH of 4, so I don't think I need to add any buffering stuff to it.


Sounds like perfect conditions for Ammonia and Hydrogen sulfide production. I personally think capping soil with sand should be avoided, gravel allows better mixing with water and better gas exchange.



How the soil below the sand looks like? Is there any yellowish discoloration visible at the glass? Can you pierce the soil with a long thin stick in few places (without fish in the tank) and see if there are any gasses released? If they smell like rotten eggs, it's H2S - even in tiny amounts it will be lethal for your fish.

I used sand as I was reading about sand beds with trumpet snails and californian blackworms. I also would quite like some kuhli loaches, or some corydoras habrosus and they all seem to prefer sand.

My tank has a bit around the bottom so I can't see most of the soil, but the bits I can see are quite black, and not yellow. I poked it, and some bubbles did come out, but they didn't smell like anything. When I planted the bed I poked it a lot, and did that again a week later. If this is the problem, is there anything I can do to help this?



This is my post from nearly 3 years ago: What's happening to my M Kubotai...?



The symptoms were pretty much the same, but the conditions were different, my tank was a few months old and had other fish in which weren't affected. I use just tap water in this tank and I think the LFS is on the same water supply. I don't know if you can draw any conclusions from my experience, but the comments in the thread can be interesting to read.



I agree with the others that the best thing is to get the conditions right in the coming weeks before adding any more fish. I guess that the fact that the amano died later in the tank points out to poor tank conditions, they are normally really hardy shrimp.

Thank you for your post. I think that perhaps I chose the absolute worst fish to start with, though I suspect everything would've had a bad time :(
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
This is my post from nearly 3 years ago: What's happening to my M Kubotai...?

The symptoms were pretty much the same, but the conditions were different, my tank was a few months old and had other fish in which weren't affected. I use just tap water in this tank and I think the LFS is on the same water supply. I don't know if you can draw any conclusions from my experience, but the comments in the thread can be interesting to read.

I agree with the others that the best thing is to get the conditions right in the coming weeks before adding any more fish. I guess that the fact that the amano died later in the tank points out to poor tank conditions, they are normally really hardy shrimp.

Was just properly reading your post again after dinner and it really is exactly the same! Had the same problem with fins, and one had a slightly red spot at the base of its tail.

I think it is different, as you said my amanos are suffering too, while yours are fine, but I think it does point to them being more fragile/badly treated in the shop fish. It's interesting to read the pointers on what I should look for in the future when buying tiny fish. What a shame, your tank with them looked very beautiful. What did you do afterwards, it says that you still had 5 at the end... did you add more so they had a nice group again? I only have 2 left, and if they survive (they're looking ok right now and are eating) I suppose I should add more in a few weeks, but also that scares me if they're fragile/the stock isn't great. Maybe I can find someone with their own quarantine tank who has a colony to give to in London.
 

sparkyweasel

Member
Joined
30 Jun 2011
Messages
1,504
I thought that since I had cycled with a larger amount of ammonia that amount of fish was fine.
Too much ammonia can kill your bacteria and set your 'cycle' back.
Not adding ammonia at all is probably a better idea. Darrel has linked to some good information on 'cycling' for you.
 

shangman

Member
Joined
13 Jul 2020
Messages
74
Location
London
Too much ammonia can kill your bacteria and set your 'cycle' back.
Not adding ammonia at all is probably a better idea. Darrel has linked to some good information on 'cycling' for you.
Yes I read Darrel's links this afternoon, I wouldn't do it again now (I read that the max was 5ppm and mostly dosed to a max of 2 - 4ppm). It's crazy that I read that method in multiple supposedly reputable sites! I'm just going to leave the tank to do it's thing for a month before thinking about adding anything else, and do weekly 50% water changes.
 

Similar threads

Top