advice wanted on hardscape

DarrenMT10

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Hi as a complete beginer at Aquascaping im at a loss with my hardscape.
The right side of the tank im happy with,the two large rocks joined together and the small rock infront of them really do look like a natural mountain range.
My issue is the rock on the left side im not sure it fits and im not 100% happy with it.
So what do you guys think ?
i could and im leaning more towards removing it and taking a hammer and bolster to it and making 2 or 3 small pieces from it ?
https://photos.app.goo.gl/d7dVySejyRuoa6ct9
https://photos.app.goo.gl/ERxnzE3pnwqAc61w5
https://photos.app.goo.gl/nKGnwXjAqcwrP5yr8
 

Tim Harrison

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I think perhaps you need more rocks and maybe including one or two bigger ones. The more you have to choose from the easier it is to create something you're happy with.
 

DarrenMT10

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Thanks Guys taken on board, i went out with the rock i wasnt happy with an created several pieces, and a tub of small bits i can place onto of the substrate to create outcrops etc.
im much happier with how my hardscape looks now. i have had to stop and stepback before i change anything again lol
IMG_20200126_154402.jpg
IMG_20200126_154344.jpg
 

Tim Harrison

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i have had to stop and stepback before i change anything again lol
That's always the best way to do it. I can create a decent scape in a couple hours, but to achieve something that I'm happy staring at for a several months can take several days or more.

Are you planning an Iwagumi? Either way it's perhaps an idea to take a look at the work of capable scapers and choose one you like look of and copy it. It will always turn out different; no two rocks are the same and your plant choice might be different etc. But the process will help you learn about composition etc that way.

Google is a good source of reference once you know what you're looking for and we have our own sort of library here as well... Planted Tank Gallery
 

DarrenMT10

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That's always the best way to do it. I can create a decent scape in a couple hours, but to achieve something that I'm happy staring at for a several months can take several days or more.

Are you planning an Iwagumi? Either way it's perhaps an idea to take a look at the work of capable scapers and choose one you like look of and copy it. It will always turn out different; no two rocks are the same and your plant choice might be different etc.

Google is a good source of reference once you know what you're looking for and we have our own sort of library here as well... Planted Tank Gallery
Thanks for the feedback Tim.
and your right my Fav Style is Iwagumi,i just wanted to have a go and imtrying to keep it simple as its my first try with live plants and aquascaping (ive had serveral tanks in the past )
my plan is to have a nice carpet going with maybe 1 or 2 other plants to the back of the tank. i am going to use tropica 123 plants and the ones in the easy range for now untill ive reseached CO2 useage etc then i plan to build a second Aquascape with a co2 system.
 

Tim Harrison

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Okay, it is possible to grow a carpet low-energy, that is without CO2, but it won't be as dense or compact, and it often requires more in the way of experience to be successful. I think a good starting point for those just starting out on their planted tank journey is perhaps the Jungle style, especially low-energy.
 

DarrenMT10

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Okay, it is possible to grow a carpet low-energy, that is without CO2, but it won't be as dense or compact, and it often requires more in the way of experience to be successful. I think a good starting point for those just starting out on their planted tank journey is perhaps the Jungle style, especially low-energy.
would those CO2 Tablets ive seen help ? i may just take the plunge and buy a Co2 system when my budget allows
 

Tim Harrison

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I wouldn't put much, if any, faith in CO2 tablets...it's a bit like snake oil. Liquid carbon or bioavailable carbon such as Seachem Flourish Excel is often considered a legitimate alternative to pressurised CO2, but it's nowhere near as effective and it's more commonly used as an algicide.

At the end of the day there is no substitute for a decent pressurised system, not only in terms of effectiveness and efficiency but also in terms of overall cost, even though the initial outlay can sometime appear prohibitive.

As for CO2, most use the fire extinguisher method. And for hardware I'd recommend you shop at either CO2 Art or Aquarium Gardens. Take a look at the Tutorial section, all the info you need to make your venture a success is there, so it's time and effort well spent.
 

DarrenMT10

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I cant leave the damn thing alone lol.
Added my base layer of sand 1cm front 2cm back of tank and had a play with the hardscape. At this point im happy and ready to add my substrate ontop of the sand and start collecting my plants
IMG-20200127-WA0006.jpeg
IMG-20200127-WA0004.jpeg
 

Andrew T

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Darren, if I may suggest a change to your scape is to put the big stones in front and then the next big one behind them but still visible and then the small ones at the back.
Then rock chips around the big ones to simulate natural erosion.
Scaping that way will give you the best look as it’ll make your tank look deep; a very desirable effect in aquascaping.
I’d also get more rocks if you can, to fill up the space more.
As Josh Sim put it , in order for your tank to look it’s best, every corner needs to be filled up, Iwagumi being the only exception.
Good luck!
 

Keith GH

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Darren

Are you planning an Iwagumi? Either way it's perhaps an idea to take a look at the work of capable scapers and choose one you like look of and copy it. It will always turn out different; no two rocks are the same and your plant choice might be different etc. But the process will help you learn about composition etc that way.
At the moment it looks like you are going backwards. My suggestion now would be strip it down and do a lot of research, then start thinking of what should I do??? Its obvious you require more rocks.

IWAGUMI INFO 5.6.17

Here are some very interesting links to Iwagumi if you are thinking of doing an Iwagumi Aquascape.

1.Japanese Garden History http://www.japanorbit.com/japanese-culture/japanese-garden.html

2. Introduction to Iwagumi
https://www.thegreenmachineonline.com/blog/iwagumi-aquascapes-introduction/

3. Guide to Iwagumi
http://www.leonardosreef.com/guide-to-iwagumi/

4. Creating Iwagumi Aquascape
http://www.fish-etc.com/aquascaping-main/create-an-iwugami-aquascape

5. How to Setup an Iwagumi Aquarium
http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/features/articles/how-to-set-up-an-iwagumi-aquarium

6. The Art of Stone Appreciation
http://www.suiseki.com/evaluating/index.html

Keith:wave::greenfinger:
 

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