Alge

Discussion in 'Algae' started by Ivan, 20 Nov 2007.

  1. Ivan

    Ivan Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Meltham
    k, I have a problem.
    The stuff is quite long, but not so long to call it thread algea, but longer than BBA, growing up to an inch or so. It is dark coloured. Any ideas as to what to do with it? Why it is there etc...
    In the meantime I'll get some water stats and some photo's.
    Cheers,
    Ivan.
     
  2. Matt Holbrook-Bull

    Matt Holbrook-Bull Founder

    Messages:
    963
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    its a nightmare, im not overly sure what it is, but i had it.. i know exactly what you mean.

    i solved it by changing my lighting, turned out my compact interpet triplus tubes werent getting on with the tank.. too much intensity in too smaller space.

    as soon as i swapped to an arcadia normal HO T5 tube, it went (with removal) and never came back.. i think mine got to over an inch long lol looked like brushed cat hair
     
  3. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

    Messages:
    4,126
    Location:
    Aston, Oxfordshire
    How flexible are the strands? It could be staghorn. Excel would shift it.

    Sam
     
  4. Matt Holbrook-Bull

    Matt Holbrook-Bull Founder

    Messages:
    963
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    it its the same stuff i had, which i recon it is.. its exactly like a carpet of BBA, but an inch long.. and not in bunches.. its very horrid
     
  5. Ivan

    Ivan Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Meltham
    It is a pain in the pipe yes. I've not seen it before in my tanks ever.

    I tested the nitrate the other day, was up there in the 80ppm range - not sure, I hate these colour test kits. Any way, I'm effecting WC every two days to get it back down to normal levels of around 25ppm. I'm only going to dose the potassium and the manganese and traces for a while too.
     
  6. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,937
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Hi Ivan,
    In my honest opinion drawing a correlation between algae and nitrates is really not the preferred path. Firstly, that 80ppm reading of your test kit is not at all reliable so you might actually wind up underdosing and have more problems if you change your strategy to account for the readings. I appreciate that each person has their opinion so I'll understand completely if you disagree based on what you are observing in your own tank. The conventional thinking is that nitrates or any nutrients do not cause algae. Following this convention, the appearance of algae is actually an indication that you may not dosing enough of something, whether that be nitrate, phosphate or CO2, or that the distribution of these nutrients within the tank is inefficient.

    Nitrates and phosphates get an unfair share of the blame for algae inducement. Frequent water changes will help a lot - not because you will be ridding the tank of nitrates but because you will be ridding the tank of NH4 and algae spores.

    Now having said all that, it is true that once algae is induced it will then feed on the nutrients that are present in the tank and will escalate tremendously. This causes a paradox because the normal reaction is to stop/reduce dosing, however if the algae is a result of nutrient deficiency then reducing the dosage only plays into the hands of the algae since the plants will suffer more giving algae more of an advantage. :wideyed: It's up to you of course but my belief is that in general the only solution is a combination of the following:

    a) continued physical removal of the algae that is present and infected leaves.
    b) review the dosing scheme with an eye towards increasing the macros NPK.
    c) review your CO2 and/or filter outlet flow, use a drop checker with 4dkh water
    d) in the short short term, reduction of lighting.
    e) increase water change frequency.

    If you'd like to give your tank size, lighting and current dosing scheme along with the photos we might be able to offer some more specific advice. ;)

    Cheers,
     
  7. Ivan

    Ivan Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Meltham
    Hi ceg.
    I agree, the liquid test kits are a pile of droppings - elephant.
    I also agree that nitrate does not contribute to algea in itself, but more of an inbalance of nutrients. My desicion to stop dosing nitrate was because my source water is reading at 5ppm (I was quite shocked at this) with the same kit. Even if the test kit is bobbins, there was a stark difference in the colour of both tests.

    I know that the nitrate will drop quite quickley because I have remedied the cause.

    Tanks stats...
    400 litre, WC every three - four days.
    pH 7, gh 7 kh 7, no-3 not at 80 ppm anymore. but not sure what it is at according to my test.
    Waiting for Co2 (A pal is trying to source me a FE)
    lighting is a t8 luminaire. 3 tubes. Switched one of them off while I fight this.
    Will have to get a list of the chems in a bit.
     

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