• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

Alpine Gardens

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
Superb! I love alpine terrestrial plants, amazing to see what can be achieved underwater!

Thanks. I am glad you can see the alpine "connection" and that it makes sense for someone familiar with terrestrial alpine. My initial idea was actually to not have the sandy area as it perhaps does not correspond too well with the alpine "vibe", but I think it has the merit of creating a more open feel.

Thomas
 

brodnig

Member
Joined
21 Dec 2011
Messages
33
Location
Bigton, Shetland
Thanks. I am glad you can see the alpine "connection" and that it makes sense for someone familiar with terrestrial alpine. My initial idea was actually to not have the sandy area as it perhaps does not correspond too well with the alpine "vibe", but I think it has the merit of creating a more open feel.

Thomas

I think the sand works well pal. Alpine 'houses' quite often feature sand so no worries on the authenticity front! Also, the eye is very much drawn to the relationship between rocks and plants, much like an alpine garden...
 

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
I think the sand works well pal. Alpine 'houses' quite often feature sand so no worries on the authenticity front! Also, the eye is very much drawn to the relationship between rocks and plants, much like an alpine garden...

Thanks: just out of interest, how do you mean that alpine houses feature sand?

Thomas
 

brodnig

Member
Joined
21 Dec 2011
Messages
33
Location
Bigton, Shetland
Thanks: just out of interest, how do you mean that alpine houses feature sand?

Thomas

Sorry mate, typing in a bit of a rush last night. Alpine plants are commonly kept in greenhouses for optimal growing conditions. Often the plants will be planted in terracotta pots that are then sunk into a bed of coarse sand, hence it's common to see alpine plants juxtaposed with sand. If you have a botanical garden nearby make a visit as they will likely have an alpine house to inspire you!

Hope that's a bit clearer :thumbup:
 

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
A constant source of joy for me. Pearling Riccia. I am thinking of letting the Riccia field expand further over the sandy area (see pics above). What do you think? Yes, the stones are greening up a bit, I have raised my lights some and will probably add some more Otos.

Thomas

10143893624_7ab6ece5e3_z_d.jpg
 

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
I like the green on the rocks, adds a feel of maturity to the hard scape and contrasts well with the riccia, scapes looking good.

Thanks. I agree that to an extent some greening of the stones actually has a positive impact. But I would like it to be more "subtle".

Thomas
 
  • Like
Reactions: tim

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
Hi Dave: just pruned everything beyond recognition. So when I return from vacation in a week it will hopefully be ready for some updated shots. Not that there is much new to report really. I did discover a tiny bit of BGA, though. Gives me the shivers as I go away for a week. Don't understand how it got there with 2 x weekly 60% water changes, good flow, and virtually no bioload. But still very little and only to be seen by mad aquarists constantly pressing their noses against the glass. So controllabe I hope.

Thanks, Vito, means a lot given the quality of your own tank.

Thomas
 

Stormy

Member
Joined
11 Dec 2008
Messages
28
The beauty of a shallow tank...without looking at the tank spec i would think it is a 4ft or 5ft tank.
A beautiful and serene tank Thomas, so soothing to look at!

you can consider adding some small pebbles on the edge of the sand, at the moment the "coast line" seems to have too much contrast (between the sand the riccia), some pebbles will soften this contrast and make it look more natural. just my humble opinion, it is beautiful as it is too!
 

Nice

Member
Joined
24 Jan 2012
Messages
84
Location
Porto
Your system would be awesome if you had a white light unit like the NA wood cabinet you have.

I don't like shallow tanks, but i quite like your plant combination
 

flygja

Member
Joined
12 Mar 2008
Messages
1,260
Location
Penang, Malaysia
Very nicely executed and superbly clean as well. I also thought I was looking at a 120cm or 180cm tank at first. White background suits this scape a bit more as its a representation of landscape and open expanse.
 

TOO

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
404
Location
Aarhus, Denmark
This tank looks amazing. Love those shallow tanks. One day I'll have my own. I've always been a black background guy but lately been wanting to try this white one.

Thanks a lot. I am white one day and black the other (when it comes to backgrounds; or maybe not if you ask my wife :)).

The beauty of a shallow tank...without looking at the tank spec i would think it is a 4ft or 5ft tank.
A beautiful and serene tank Thomas, so soothing to look at!

you can consider adding some small pebbles on the edge of the sand, at the moment the "coast line" seems to have too much contrast (between the sand the riccia), some pebbles will soften this contrast and make it look more natural. just my humble opinion, it is beautiful as it is too!

I am flattered, thanks, as this comes from a master of the trade. The pebbles idea is good. I am great fan of pebbles in scapes in general. Another option to soften the line would be to use Sarawak sand instead of Nile. The Sarawak is a bit warmer in tone. I have also considered diminishing the sand area by extending the Riccia carpet.

Your system would be awesome if you had a white light unit like the NA wood cabinet you have.


Yeah, I have actually been close to getting this, but it is really way too much light over this shallow tank. And it is bigger as it accommodates four tubes. Like the light look of the ADA.

Very nicely executed and superbly clean as well. I also thought I was looking at a 120cm or 180cm tank at first. White background suits this scape a bit more as its a representation of landscape and open expanse.

It is funny how people get the impression of the bigger size. I was very attentive to using only plants that would maintain a sense of scale, particularly important, I think, in a shallow tank.

Thomas
 
Top