Anubias barteri var. angustifolia?

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by Sofia, 26 Mar 2008.

  1. Sofia

    Sofia Newly Registered

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    Hello,

    I bought some aquatic plants from my lfs and bought this one without knowing what it was, so I did some searching and I think it's Anubias barteri var. angustifolia.

    According to tropica it should be tied to wood or plants. I want to make sure that I've got a correct plant id before I do this so could you please help me? :)

    Attatched are some pics. The plant has been in the aquarium planted in gravel for a week, I have pulled out all the plants and they are floating in the aquarium because when i took this one out some of the roots had rotted.

    Rhizome
    P3260874.jpg

    Leaf
    P3260876.jpg

    whole plant
    P3260878.jpg

    thanks :)
     
  2. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Hmn, not sure thats Anubias, can't really make out a rhizome. The stems seem to be comming from a single point. It sort of looks like a Crypt? Hard to judge scale though. How big is this plant?
     
  3. milla

    milla Member

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    Yes thats some sort of crypt
     
  4. Sofia

    Sofia Newly Registered

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    All the stems came in a pot, they were all attached to eachother and I seperated them probably not the best thing to do but they had all this cotton wool stuff embedded in the roots and i wanted to get rid of it all before I stuck it in my tank.

    So...all the stems were part of one single rhizome.

    I've taken some more pics of the rhizome, the longest stem is about 20cm long and the smallest is about 5cm.

    Seperated plants
    P3260889.jpg

    Rhizome
    P3260886.jpg

    Rhizome
    P3260885.jpg
     
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I found this pick of Anubias Lanceolata which looks similar, if a little shorter. Roots look the same too, thick and white:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Sofia

    Sofia Newly Registered

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    Thanks, Devuk the roots do look like that!!! Thanks for the crypt confirmation too, milla.

    I guess that means I'll be attaching these plants to my bogwood and stones :)
     
  7. Aeropars

    Aeropars Member

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    Thats either a Crypt or a sword of some discription. These should be planted in the substrate and not on rock/wood.
     
  8. Sofia

    Sofia Newly Registered

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    ok i'm confused now :(
    Do crypts have rhizomes, this plant had quite a substantial rhizome and the top of it was hard and green. If it is a crypt what kind of information could i look for or give to confirm this?
     
  9. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    That is very definately a crypt and not an anubia. COudl be Cryptocoryne parva?

    Sam
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I did wonder that, but doubt welled up in my mind and I didn't post it ;)

    I'm not sure what the root of Crypt Parva looks like, but Crypt Balansae does have a root tuba (correct expression?) that does sort of resemble a rhizome. Probably the best test will be to plant it and see if it melts (like many crypts do when you first plant them) :lol:
     
  11. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    Tuba is the right word, it serves the same function as a rhizome in that it stores food.
     
  12. Aquaspot World

    Aquaspot World Newly Registered

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  13. Sofia

    Sofia Newly Registered

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    Thanks everyone, it does look a lot like that picture so it is most likely that crypt. I'll pant it again and see what happens :) by 'melt' I assume you mean the leave go all soft and die? And if it does do this should I just leave it in the substrate and let it be?
     
  14. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

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    Yeah if it does melt just leave it alone and it will re-grow new leaves. IMO Ben is right and it is C. x willisi.
     
  15. nry

    nry Member

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    It's tuber by the way, tuba's make loads of noise if played correctly ;)
     
  16. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

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    BTW a tuber is a more generic term for a storage organ on a plant and can include stem organs such as rhizomes and root organs.

    An example of a stem tuber is a rhizome such as those grown by Cryptocorynes and Anubias and many Nymphaea. They grow along and the leaves come off them as they spread.
    Other stem tubers include those grown by plants such as Cyclamen and potatoes.

    Root tubers include Dahlias and Hemerocallis and the only one I can think of in aquatic plants is a Banana plant.

    True bulbs store their resources in modified leaves as can be seen when you slice an onion. An aquatic plant with these are Crinums.
     
  17. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    We live and learn :)
     

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