• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

Asellus aquaticus

chka

Member
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
Do this species live in Ireland/UK?
I read in Russian aquarium forums it easily adaptable in aquariums, and is similar to Amano shrimp in regards to algae eating. Also it easily reproducing in tanks.
0794.jpg

Asellus aquaticus
 

tam

Member
Joined
5 May 2011
Messages
1,048
My (UK) pond filter is always full of them them, I thought they fed on decaying stuff at the bottom of ponds/filters rather than algae, maybe they resort to eating it in tanks as they have less mulm to snack on. Not sure they'd cope with tropical temperatures either as googling it sounds like they are northern europe etc. natives with different species in warmer areas.
 

chka

Member
Thread starter
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
google translate of the article:
Asellus aquaticus
2 Asellus aquaticus as permanent inhabitants of the aquarium. For this purpose the reservoir may also be low. As a lot better use of coarse sand, which is placed on top small pebbles. Half of the reservoir is better to plant the plants. By the way, Asellus aquaticus well cope with hair algae and diatoms, buyout grow on the leaves of higher plants. In such circumstances, the dim light of the donkeys can be seen day and night (fear of bright light). In a 20-liter old, overgrown vegetation aquarium, 20-30 crustaceans can not feed at all. This will reduce the irrepressible fecundity of donkeys, and live longer.


Asellus aquaticus bypassed attention aquarists, but in vain. As forage crops nutritionally they have no equal. Chitin layer they have a very soft and they are all eaten by the fish.This is especially important for those involved in divorce, difficult in this respect fish. Yeah, just keep these crustaceans - great fun. Contain the same crab-spiders (the same size as the donkeys), which in general is not seen in the aquarium. For example, to verify whether alive my crab spiders have to try very hard - poperevorachivat all the rocks in the aquarium. So, I recommend to pay attention to these interesting crustaceans, which can catch an ordinary aquarium net, almost anywhere where there is water.

not sure if google translate makes much sense here :)
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,777
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
They are very common in nearly all ponds and slow flowing rivers. A lot of the information on the net isn't right, and despite what is often quoted your link is right, and they live and breed quite happily in tropical tanks.

I have them in all the tanks, they are fish and fish egg safe and they are a "no maintenance" addition. The advantage of them over shrimps is that they can persist in tanks even where there are fish that wil eat crustaceans. The disadvantage is that they aren't very aesthetically pleasing.

If you would like some, and are in the UK, I can send some. It will be £4 to cover P&P.

cheers Darrel
 
Last edited:

chka

Member
Thread starter
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
If you would like some, and are in the UK, I can send some. It will be £4 to cover P&P

Thanks, Darrel. I am in Ireland... There is a canal not for from me:
Grand Canal
Do you think I can find them in it?
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,777
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
There is a canal not for from me:Grand Canal. Do you think I can find them in it?
Yes, almost certainly. A good handfull of water weed should provide some.

There is another very similar Amphipod crustacean to look out for when you are collecting, and these are the "Water Shrimps" <Gammarus spp>. They perform almost the same role as Asellus, but require much higher oxygen levels, which makes them less suitable for aquarium life.

The easiest way to tell them apart is that Gammarus are flattened from side to side and are active swimmers. Asellus are flattened from top to bottom, and don't swim.

cheers Darrel
 

alto

Member
Joined
24 Dec 2014
Messages
6,246
Interesting for certain! Are those juveniles that appear on the nearby leaves (& on the ramshorn) at about 45 - 60s?
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,777
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
and also mentioned above by dw1305 gammarus:
Nice video, you need to look at its urosome, but I think that is the closely related <"Crangonyx pseudogracilis">, these are meant to feed on green algae, so it looks like yours have read the book.

Crangonyx
urosome
crangonyx_pseudogracilis-jpg.jpg

now they live in all of my tanks even if I did not introduced them on purpose
I've managed to accidentally send people Asellus hidden with Moss and Riccia etc. I haven't found any down-side to Asellus yet as a "tank janitor".

cheers Darrel
 

chka

Member
Thread starter
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
Hi all,
Just found this Crangonyx video on YouTube.


cheers Darrel
yes it looks like mine... for some reason I upset that mines are not gammarus :))

they were caught together with asellus in Grand Canal in Ireland... so they must be local species...
and yes - I never seen it bigger then 8mm in my tanks. most of them 4-5mm
 

chka

Member
Thread starter
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
Last edited:

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,777
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
for some reason I upset that mines are not gammarus
I think Crangonyx is pretty widespread in Eire. It is originally N. American, but occurs all over the UK.

It is actually much more suitable for the aquarium, because it tolerates warm water (and pollution) much better than the Gammarus species do.

I've just looked it up, and the island of Ireland actually only has one native species of Gammarus, G. duebeni. This is coastal in mainland UK, where G. pulex is the common freshwater shrimp.

As well as Crangonyx, G. pulex and G. tigrinus (also N. American) have been introduced to Ireland, and I would assume that most Gammarids you find would be non-native.

They all look <"pretty similar">.

cheers Darrel
 

chka

Member
Thread starter
Joined
8 Mar 2014
Messages
125
what about Ladoga Lake in Russia? Last summer I filmed one pond connected to Ladoga lake - it was full of gammarus like species. Despite Ladoga is quite cold lake this pond was so shallow so should be quite warm on sunny days. And it was full of gammaruses...

They are quite big - more then 1 sm. Will they tolerate warm waters?

here it is at 8:55
 
Last edited:

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,777
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
And it was full of gammaruses...They are quite big - more then 1 sm. Will they tolerate worm waters?
No would be my guess, but there is no way of telling what they are from the video. Species mentioned for Lake Ladoga are an alien from the Lake Baikal Gmelinoides fasciatus and Gammarus lacustris.

<"Gmelinoides fasciatus is used in aquaculture">, so would appear to be the more likely survivor in the aquarium.

cheers Darrel
 
Top