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Brine shrimp shells

idris

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3 Jan 2011
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Herts
Posting for "a friend" who only wishes to be identified as The Lazy Aquarist ...😅

TLA has found an unopened bottle of brine shrimp eggs at the back of their cupboard.
They're only planning of feeding them to their fish maybe once or twice a week, and not with the aim.of raising fry, and probably hatching only 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of eggs at a time.
TLA has a 50gal tank, and wondering whether its a big deal filtering out the shells from the hatched brine shrimp, as it'll probably only amount to a gram or two.

Thanks in advance eon behalf of "my friend".
 

Geoffrey Rea

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Hi @idris

Your “friend” may want to consider one of these:

1632122484120.jpeg


The Artemia gather in the collection cup where the hole letting the light in is positioned, in the middle. Lift the collection cup up… baby brine shrimp, no eggs.

Only make one batch per week and after three days, collect for the other four days of that week. Just place on a warm window sill, no air pump, no light needed. Wash the unit each week after use and hatch rate will remain high.
 

idris

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I believe their intention is to cobble together some heath-robinson affair with a coke bottle and bits like an air pump that have been cluttering up the place for years. (TLA is also a complete cheap-@r$e. 🤣)
 

shangman

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13 Jul 2020
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London
Here is my lazy cheap way of doing it cos I hate buying specific gear.
  • Get a plastic takeaway box or plastic tupperware box that's a not-too-deep cuboid. No need for a lid.
  • Fill it with tapwater and add a heaped spoon of sea salt (the kitchen kind not the marine kind). Don't bother with dechlorinator.
  • Add half a teaspoon or less of BBS eggs
  • Float the box in one of your tanks, ideally a heated one.
  • Wait a day
  • Harvest your BBS - I use a big plastic syringe. Angle it so you get more BBS than shells - they will congregate together at the brightest corner usually.
  • Put a paper coffee filter over a cup or glass
  • Squirt all the BBS with water into the coffee filter and wait for it to drain
  • Suck up some aquarium water with your syringe and slowly squirt it into the coffee filter as soon as the waste water has drained
  • Immediately suck the water back in with the syringe, the BBS will come with it.

  • Enjoy your fish going bananas for BBS, it's easy to target feed with the syringe so perfect for babies or shy fish, my fish aren't always of the syringe at all any more and go towards it immediately excitedly.
  • If you want a constant supply, have 2 boxes on the go, and replace 1 daily. I only feed hatched BBS for 2 days before replacing.
 

idris

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Herts
TLA has reminded me their main question is how much of a problem. It would be if the empty shells weren't separated out. In a moderately planted, well populated, good sized tank, would they get eaten by inverts or would their decay provide any nutrients for plants?
 

shangman

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13 Jul 2020
Messages
646
Location
London
Not even an air atone?
Nope! I tried it for a while but it didn't seem to make any difference tbh. And since I've bought more expensive eggs with higher hatch rates there isn't too much shells either.

Back to the question: When I was feeding loads of BBS to babies in a tank I got quite a few shells mixed in there too. The fish eat them and then spit them out, I think it's like eating a bit of sand for them - not tasty. I also found it annoying that they float on the surface and get stuck in hard-to-clean places. They do eventually go away, getting sucked into the filter and then that's cleaned, or with a hose. And I never noticed any negative effects in the tank from them. Mostly they are just ugly. Personally I like to separate out and almost all tutorials will too, if you get a plastic syringe it's very easy to do, because the shells float or sink to the bottom, and the BBS swim in the water congregating at the brightest light source so can be targeted without hassle.
 
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