Bug!

Majsa

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26 Apr 2017
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Anyone an idea who this little guy is? I found him and his friends in the bark of one of my phalaenopsis orchids. They are incredibly small and quite fast too, I had hard time putting one under the microscope (x100) but some hairspray helped :) I'm hoping it's a predatory mite of some sort and not a harmful one.

IMG_2720.JPG
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
They are incredibly small and quite fast too.....it's a predatory mite of some sort
@dw1305 ....darrel, amaze us with your knowledge!
I don't know, but "Mite and predatory" would be my guess as well.

Have a look at Phytoseiulus persimilis that is the one they use in commercial biological control of spider mite.

It is speedy and has long legs, like your one.

cheers Darrel
 

Majsa

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The Netherlands
Have a look at Phytoseiulus persimilis that is the one they use in commercial biological control of spider mite.
Cool creatures, it could be this one or family, at least mine look more like Phytoseiulus than a spider mite. I also found Stratiolaelops, looks like that one too. Anyway, they seem to be quite harmless, that's good :) Thanks!
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I also found Stratiolaelops, looks like that one too.
I found him and his friends in the bark of one of my phalaenopsis orchids
That one looks even more promising as an ID. Stratiolaelops isn't one I've heard of before*, but it is quite likely used in <"IPM"> at the Orchid nurseries.
least mine look more like Phytoseiulus than a spider mite
They are incredibly small and quite fast too.
Long-legged and speedy is a really good identifier of a likely predator.

*Edit: Got it, it used to be Hypoaspis

cheers Darrel
 
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