Bulbless nymphaea?

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by sari, 17 Jun 2009.

  1. sari

    sari Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Basingstoke, U.K.
    Hi all,
    I have just come back from my local MA and they were selling red leaved nymphaea species as bulbless leaves with some roots on. They had one growing in their tropical display tank and it seemed fine but I'm a bit dubious. I thought waterlilies needed the bulbs to have energy to grow? They only cost a couple of quid but I don't want to buy and bve disappointed...so any opinions,chuck them this way please! ;)
     
  2. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    The bulb is the 'mother'. The plant doesn't need it.

    The new plants will grow from the bulb but can be seperated and planted elsewhere.

    Bit cheeky for them to sell them bulbless though!!!

    AC
     
  3. Murphy-18

    Murphy-18 Member

    Messages:
    86
    Thats good i was sort of wondering the same, as my Nymphaea has just grown a new plant, and i wasnt sure whether i could seperate it and replant. Cheers :)
     
  4. sari

    sari Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Basingstoke, U.K.
    I have sort of decided not to get one, I have a Tropica Nymphaea Zenkeri bulb that has never grown leaves so will plant it again and see... I would probably get another tropica one if this one doesn't take, we'll see. :bored:
     
  5. GreenNeedle

    GreenNeedle Member

    Messages:
    2,706
    Location:
    Lincoln UK
    Nymphea plants have dormant periods so don't worry if it takes a while. Once started it will rocket up.

    Makes ure you get Zenker i bulbs if you want the 'speckling'. They are more like normal bulbs round bottom, pointed top. The more comme Rubra bulbs are like a block of wood and send out much plainer 'peachy' leaves.

    AC
     
  6. sari

    sari Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Basingstoke, U.K.
    Thanks for that,to me the bulb doesnt look very vital. It is mostly still firm and has a couple of root tips visible so perhaps there is hope... I know it is a zenkeri since it is a tropica variety from the TGM. My worry is it has been dormant ever since I received it last year, perhaps it didn't like my previous tank. Now it is in a light spot so maybe...It's one of my favourite plants so would really like it to thrive......... :(
     
  7. AndyOx

    AndyOx Member

    Messages:
    87
    Location:
    South Oxfordshire
    You could try floating the bulb on the surface for a couple of weeks, it will probably sprout really quickly. I had some dormant bulbs from my mother plants that I did this with and once they'd started there was no stopping them........ until i gave the plants to a friend with plecs.............. I gather they were very tasty!!! :lol:
     
  8. sari

    sari Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Basingstoke, U.K.
    Oh. my bulbs have never floated.... I think I might have a duff bulb... :rolleyes:
     
  9. AndyOx

    AndyOx Member

    Messages:
    87
    Location:
    South Oxfordshire


    Do you have any plants nearer the surface you could lodge the bulb in? Mine don't always float so I have to cheat!! If you think your bulb is a dudd one I can have a dig around my red tiger lotus and see what I can dig up for you? It is a lovely plant but sometimes I need to brutalise it!! It thrives on it tho!! :D
     
  10. sari

    sari Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Basingstoke, U.K.
    Thanks for the offer, may have to take you up on it. I truly doubt it's going to grow, I had a look at a photo I took on arrival and it seems to have shrunk. I got it last October and it has never shown signs of life unfortunately. Surely the dormant periods shouldn't last this long... :(

    I see you are in Oxfordshire, not too far from me so if there's any luck in your rummage...
     

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