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Celestial Glade - 125Ltr Low Light, Low Maintenance

GreenNeedle

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Yep. I rescued them as they were completely swarmed by the medium Anubias.

Tried the cotton wool and as normal lost my rag with it so they have been superglued to small pebbles :lol:

Worked a treat too. Was reading bout superglue and unlike other glues the bonding agent is actually water so you don't have to dry the plant first. Just shake off the excess water and then on went the moist rhizomes. Left to cure for a few minutes and then put them in a pot for a few hours to see if it would hold.

They are already in the tank now so will watch the fish and shrimp carefully. They were in pretty bad shape because of their lack of any light and the shrimp are all over them. Maybe they are stuck :lol:

Will see how this works out. Plenty of light so should grow at a reasonable pace compared to where they were on the wood.

AC
 

GreenNeedle

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No cotton or fishing line in this scape.

A mixture of elastic bands, staples and superglue it is. lol

TBH I had just been supergluing one of the kids' toys back together so it was in my line of sight when I lost it with the cotton :twisted:

Interesting research showed me that reef keepers very often use superglue to hold their Corals in place ;)

AC
 

Nick16

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let us know how well they do, if they stay stuck and if the poison anything, or any other side effects, i normally use fishing line but end up shouting and swearing at a rock in some futile attempt that it might 'play ball'
 

George Farmer

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Yeah, I've heard of coral frags being glued and it's used in surgery etc. I just never associated the plants with it.

Weird really, as I can manage to associate most things, somehow, with the hobby...

I love the fern BTW. I'm steering away from fern/Anubias 'scapes but when I return I'd like one like that.
 

GreenNeedle

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Many thanks George. Taken a couple of years being jealous of your ferns to get to this stage. lol

I wouldn't think the superglue would poison anything. If it were the slightest bit dangeous I don't think reefers would be using it. They seem to be the most cautious in the hobby.

This isn't the superglue used to stitch skin though. Its a different type that is used to 'stitch' skin. the type I've used is standard Loctite stuff but there isn't a 'harmful to aquatic life' warning on it which has to be there by law if there is any danger.

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GreenNeedle

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Just go and get some from Wilko ot Tesco. That is incredibly overpriced where you have linked.

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GreenNeedle

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No need for such research. just buy the cheapest one that you find in your local supermarket's stationery section.

Superglue bonds when it hits water. This means that when you put superglue on one surface the moment it hits another it will bond. This is because almost everything in the world will have at least some microscopic amounts of moisture on it from the air!!!. It cures from the outside so it is pointless to think something will stick better if you use more. A small amount will cure and harden very quickly.

So use it sparingly. Let is cure for a few hours. If in doubt then leave it a seperate container of fresh water for a period of time.

Mine has been in the tank now since 3 O clockish and the shrimps have been all over it and it is not a graveyard!!!

I don't think you are going to need 20 bottles!!! How many tanks do you have? You will only be using it for initial sticking of things with hard rhizomes like Anubias and ferns.

If you want several then go to Poundland and they sell packs of 5 small throwaways. these are small ones that you use and then chuck away after you've finished. Next time you need to use it you get a fresh one. Good idea because Superglues often are useless a few days after using because they have been exposed to the air (which contains water!!!)

AC

AC
 

Nick16

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cool good tips there thanks, when glueing, do youput the plant straight back or do you put it into a bucket fully submerged or just the roots submerged?

yeah, thing is pound land is about a 40 minute drive there and back, plus parking costs, plus the time it takes me to walk from the car to the shop about another 15 mins so its quite far, i have 3 tanks but my dad uses lots of superglue anyway as im always breaking stuff :lol:
 

GreenNeedle

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I took the anubias out just before I did a water change. After I'd finished I set about attaching them. they had been out of the tank for about 30 minutes already and I would guess after gluing for a total of an hour or so.

I glued them and let each cure until I could feel it was firm to the stone and then put them into a bowl of water for a few hours to leach out anything that could be on the glue's surface then placed the stones in the tank.

The leaves may die off from drying out too much but they will soon grow new ones. One of the Rhizomes has no leaves on it anyway!!!

AC
 

GreenNeedle

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Yep.

I remember Tom Barr posting on TFF maybe as far back a year ago, maybe even longer when there was a 'low light carpeting question'

Anubias Barteri v Nana 'petite' was one of his suggestions then (Can't remember what he called it. lol.)

I had this in my first tank which from my 'beginner's knowledge' was still following low light/high light theories and under the light I had (1WPG T8) it was slow.

Then I suggested it to Saintly the other day in one of his journals because I can see his Anubias are growing fast at which point I thought 'hang on, my Anubias grow fast too'. Put 1+2 together and I got 5 so I thought now I don't believe in low light/high light plants and I know my light is growing plants really well including normal Anubias then surely these will grow at a reasonable rate as long as I bring them out of the shadows and there you go.

In the space of 6 hours they were rescued from under the shadow of other Anubias and ferns that had overgrown them, glued, and in situ in the front of the tank. Another experiment maybe but I am quite confident with this one (aren't I always ;))

I would guess I rescued about 2 portions at AM size so we shall see over the next month how fast they will grow.

AC
 
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That's interesting, I've never heard of a carpet of Anubias before. So you've attached them to pebbles and will the just grow accross the substrate, eventually covering it?

Got any pics?
 

GreenNeedle

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I will get round to some pictures. Maybe later in the week. currently splitting a double glazed window into 2 pieces of glass planning to use 1 as the underside to my 'luminaire' once the LEDs are sorted, then I have to get onto a letter to the airline, threatening to take them to court after refusing to pay any more than flight costs after they left my family and I in Portugal last year. Gonna be a busy week. lol

The plan with the Anubias is that I have put them on 1cm(ish) pebbles just to hold them down. As we know Anubias then stretch their roots down to the substrate and therefore by the time they grow sufficiently they should've anchored themselves.

AC
 
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