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CO2 Art Inline Diffuser

DaveWatkin

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Joined
26 Oct 2020
Messages
210
Location
Aberdeen, UK
Anyone running one of these and what pressure are you running at? Packaging states a 30psi minimum requirements but I'm running at <15psi and is working fine. Just seemed a bit strange to me and wanted to see what others experiences are. Could be a mis calibration on my gauge but not seen one out by that much before.

Dave
 

Gold Fish

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Joined
30 Jul 2021
Messages
44
Location
DE141DX
I have just installed one in place of a bazooka in tank.
Trying to maintain the same amount of co2 I reduced the output pressure. I end up with a similar bubble count at just above 10 psi. This drop from 30 to 10 made me to glue the seals to the ends of the diffuser. Still the pressure is small, the diffused co2 is in fine bubbles, and for the moment everything looks ok.
I have checked for leaks at 30 and10 psi finding none...
 

hypnogogia

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Joined
6 Apr 2017
Messages
992
Location
Oxfordshire
I use one and found that at lower pressure the bubbles are bigger. For the finest mist I find a pressure closer to 30psi better.
 

Gold Fish

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Joined
30 Jul 2021
Messages
44
Location
DE141DX
I use one and found that at lower pressure the bubbles are bigger. For the finest mist I find a pressure closer to 30psi better.
I feel this statement is not correct.
The pressure in a pneumatic system is created by restrictions. Just think, if you put 30 psi in one end of a tube, but you don't have anything on the other end, you will have an normal atmospheric pressure in it. If on the other side, you put a chork on it, you will have 30 psi inside.
For the same flow through our diffuser, we will have the same pressure just before the diffuser. If that will be increased, more co2 will pass through, increasing the bubble count.
What are you reading on your gage, is the pressure between the reductor and the needle valve, after which, you will have a pressure drop to the required pressure to push the co2 through the diffuser at the desired flow (bubble count).
 
Last edited:

DaveWatkin

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Thread starter
Joined
26 Oct 2020
Messages
210
Location
Aberdeen, UK
I feel this statement is not correct.
The pressure in a pneumatic system is created by restrictions. Just think, if you put 30 psi in one end of a tube, but you don't have anything on the other end, you will have an normal atmospheric pressure in it. If on the other side, you put a chork on it, you will have 30 psi inside.
For the same flow through our diffuser, we will have the same pressure just before the diffuser. If that will be increased, more co2 will pass through, increasing the bubble count.
What are you reading on your gage, is the pressure between the reductor and the needle valve, after which, you will have a pressure drop to the required pressure to push the co2 through the diffuser at the desired flow (bubble count).
I agree. Had some correspondence with CO2 art over DM (very helpful) and was recommended to crank to 30psi and lower bps with needle valve but to me this just means lowering the pressure downstream of the needlevalve as its an open ended system, albeit restricted, so its the same as running a lower psi with the needle open.

Not sure why the recommended is a high pressure upstream, I can’t see much benefit with my limited knowledge of pneumatics but would love another opinion.
 

Gold Fish

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Joined
30 Jul 2021
Messages
44
Location
DE141DX
The benefit of having 30 psi upstream is that if you open the needle valve fully and let all that pressure reach the diffuser, you will obtain a maximum co2 flow.
The needle valve can only reduce pressure, it can't increase it.
So we have a 30 psi, reduced by the needle valve to a pressure, at which, the diffuser will "leak" the desired flow of co2, measured by the bubble counter.
Because I run it at low pressure, I will not be able to reach a maximum flow level. If I will want to increase my bubble count, probably, I will need to increase my pressure on the reductor.
 
Last edited:

DaveWatkin

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Thread starter
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26 Oct 2020
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210
Location
Aberdeen, UK
But to tweak you could just open up the regulator valve more. I find the regulator valve has better control than the needle valve on my CO2 art regulator
 
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