CO2 Diffusion

a1Matt

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Aeropars said:
Whats Venturi?!

In practical terms relating to the CO2 reactor, you take a length of airline tubing and insert one end in the reactor and the other end of the tubing you place anywhere in the water flow just before the input to the reactor. This creates the venturi loop which removes any pocket of gas in the reactor.

My understanding of the science is not good enough for me to be able to decontruct it concisely for you. A bona fide explanation of the science can be found here, but you might find it a bit esoteric.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venturi_effect" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;"

To expand in the comment in my last post about whether this would be of any use to you; if you were to notice a large pocket of gas at the top of the reactor and one end of the venturi loop was terminating inside this gas bubble it would effectively remove the gas bubble. The gas has to physically enter the venturi loop to be removed though, so if you can not actually see any build up of gas in your reactor then the venturi loop won't help you.

It sounds like you have a gas build up somewhere though, or you wouldn't get the spurts out of the filter outlet. To my mind the logical place is the reactor, but you might have other factors that are having more of an influence that I haven't thought of.

If you want to get your head around the venturi concept further I recommend you to do what I did which is to spend a few hours poring over the links to the venturi I posted before. There is a picture of the internal reactor that clearly shows the extra tubing for the loop and the placement of it.
 

ceg4048

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Hi,
A venturi is based on two simple principles:
The first is that as the velocity of any fluid (gases included) increases, it's pressure necessarily decreases.
The second principle is that as a fluid approaches a restriction it's velocity must increase to avoid a vacuum near this restriction.

The hourglass shape of the venturi comes in handy therefore because as the fluid approaches the "throat" it speeds up through this restriction and the pressure is at its lowest because of this increased velocity. As the restriction eases on the far side of the restriction the fluid flow slows down and it's pressure rises.

This is how a some clever guy invented the carburetor. Fuel is injected at the "throat" of the venturi section of the carburetor and dissolves in the air stream. The low pressure at the throat "sucks" the fuel out into the engine. As you open the throttle the airflow rate increases and the pressure drops even further dumping more fuel into the airflow so the engine accelerates.

This venturi phenomenon also works on an airplane/bird wing as the wing is larger on top than it is on the bottom. As a result the airflow on top of the wing accelerates more than it does on the lower surface lowering the pressure on the top side. Because the pressure is higher on the lower surface than on the upper surface this pressure difference causes an upward force we call "lift".

Cheers,
 

Aeropars

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Clive... you blow me away with nearly all of your posts!

Can someone get that man a glass of wine??
 

ceg4048

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Arana said:
ceg4048 said:
Make that a Pinot Grigio please.... :D

Cheers,

I had you down as a Pomerol man ;)

Love all the Merlots - Pomerol, Graves, St. Estephe, Lusac - but they are too expensive, just like some ferts I know. :rolleyes: Better value can be found with the Spanish reds Tempranillo or Ribera del Duero (Riojas suffers from "me too" Gucci syndrome ). :lol:

Cheers,
 

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