Cold stratification

mort

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
1,263
Hi, yet another garden question. I have seeds that I put outside for the winter to cold stratify but some after only a couple of weeks have started to come up (greengages so far). I also have some Japanese maple seeds that I put out last autumn, that didn't do anything until it started to get cold this year (I realise they can take a while), that have started to germinate.
So my question is, is it to early for them to survive? I've popped them in the greenhouse to provide protection from the weather but not sure if any winter dormancy occurs at such an early age, or whether they will just wither away.

Thanks in advance.
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,478
Location
Netherlands
If i have seeds that need it i do it in the fridge before the spring. :) In a shallow plastic tub covered with soil and a lid and leave them in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks bellow 5°C. It works very good for Poppies. These plant seeds like a warm / cold / warm period for best results.

But it also depends on species what and how long it needs. And also the seeds fertility period can be an issue, some lose it if stored too long and or stored wrongly.

These are all things you need to know about.

To do it outdoors is tricky with a few seeds and the strange changes in climate periods we have nowadays in our region. A lot of plants don't know what's going on anymore. It's almost Christmas and in my garden, the Strawberry is still happily flowering. :) A year ago it was competely gone at this time of year.

I guess doing it controlled in the correct periode gives more chances of succes.
 
Last edited:

mort

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
1,263
We haven't really had any wintery weather here yet either, perhaps one or two sharp frosts but then we arent all that far from you. There are still dahlias flowering round the corner from me. I guess everything thinks it's spring but I'm thinking a prolonged period of cold next year will likely kill the seedlings off, so I'll possibly just pot them on and try them on a bright windowsill. I'm only growing them because I had the seed and thought I'd have a go at grafting if any looked like nice rootstock. I put a few seeds outside last year to do the same and was surprised how well they came up, so thought I'd give it another go with slightly different things.
 

dw1305

Expert
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
10,975
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
So my question is, is it to early for them to survive? I've popped them in the greenhouse to provide protection from the weather but not sure if any winter dormancy occurs at such an early age, or whether they will just wither away.
They will probably be alright. Cold Greenhouse should be fine, cool and light and it will allow you to keep them a little bit drier than you would outdoors.
try them on a bright windowsill.
You could try that as well, lack of light is likely to be the greatest issue
I'm only growing them because I had the seed and thought I'd have a go at grafting if any looked like nice rootstock.
They graft relatively well, you can use whip and tongue grafting or side veneer grafting. You just need a very sharp knife (a backed razor blade is good).

You may find that some of the seedlings you get are as good as the named cultivars, so that reduces the need for grafting.

I've never had any joy at all with grafting plums or cherries, it is always ended up as a horrible gummy mass, and even if the graft has originally taken it has snapped afterwards, and you can see it is a very small proportion of the graft union that is good.

cheers Darrel
 

mort

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
1,263
I just thought I'd try and grow some fruit from the seed I normally disguard since I'm starting to get better crops from my young trees. I'm the kind of person who learns more from my failures than reading something, which is why I'd like to try grafting or any other propagation methods. I'm trying to propagate as many of the plants I have as possible even if I don't want more as we have a sale for charity every year or i can give them away. Named cultivars don't worry me, I've picked up very cheap fruit trees that are my best producers/flavours that I haven't a clue what variety they are supposed to be, its just nice to learn whilst creating something.
 
Last edited:

mort

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
1,263
All the greengages survived and are growing well

20200410_112723.jpg
20200410_112755.jpg


The Japanese maples are getting there but the slugs seem to love them so a few got munched.
 
Top