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DIY Copper pipe light hanger?

Hufsa

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22 Aug 2019
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Norway
I am planning to make a DIY pipe hanger setup for my tank. Because of how the ceiling above the tank is, I want a pipe setup that can be mounted directly onto the back on the stand.
I was thinking of using copper pipe for plumbing to make it. The pipe comes in soft (bendable) and half hard, so I assume half hard is best. Which pipe diameter will be sufficient to hold the light up without bending, 10, 12, 15 or 22mm?
Any other tips or links to similar projects greatly appreciated :thumbup:
 

dw1305

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nr Bath
Hi all,
I am planning to make a DIY pipe hanger setup for my tank. Because of how the ceiling above the tank is, I want a pipe setup that can be mounted directly onto the back on the stand.
I was thinking of using copper pipe for plumbing to make it. The pipe comes in soft (bendable) and half hard, so I assume half hard is best.
I'll add in Marcel @zozo , because I think he has made these.

Cheers Darrel
 

Hufsa

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Norway
Hmm so brass is softer? My main concern was the pipes bending any from the weight of the light, I was planning to spraypaint the copper with a neutral metallic finish in some shade of gray.
I have drawn a highly detailed technical schematic of how I am imagining it:
20220417_155335.jpg
So the parts needed would be 3 lengths of rigid pipe (Edit: plus 2 short pieces), 4 pieces of 90degree fittings, and two clamps to screw it onto the back of the cabinet.
I wasn't really planning to bend anything as I dont have the proper tools to do a good job of it, although I'm sure it would have looked very sleek. Since sleek is out of the window I could settle for mildly industrial.
Do you know what diameter pipe I should go for @The grumpy one of I do copper?
 
Last edited:

zozo

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16 Apr 2015
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8,302
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Netherlands
The only one I ever made from copper pipe and brass parts is this one... :)
1.
dsc_0628-jpg.122796

2.
dsc_0633-jpg.122799

3.
dsc_0632-jpg.122798

4.
dsc_0630-jpg.122810


Picture 3. I used a 12mm copper tube because the cable suspension parts also seemed to be 12mm. For example this part (cable ceiling mount).
Schermafbeelding 2022-04-17 165311.jpg

It came in Nickle plated brass, I took off the plating in reversed electrolysis and I did cut off the flanch, and it fitted soldered it in the 12mm copper knee. Which also could have been a copper T obviously. Also could have used a 15mm pipe and used a 12x15 reducer, or 22mm with a 22x12 reducer. So you can choose any pipe diameter you wish or feel like.

Picture 4. I used this cable sliding clamp, the same thing if it came as Nickle plated brass and I took it off... It has an internal M6 thread at the other end.
Schermafbeelding 2022-04-17 165923.jpg




The picture 4. part with the arrow, I took from an old chrome-plated Toilet seat hinge... It was the only brass part I could find that fitted as I needed it to fit... :happy:

Anyway, as said depending on the weight it needs to support you could use these same parts and make it from 22mm copper pipe and use reducers to fit the cable suspension in. :) I guess if you like to bend 22mm copper pipe with lowering the lights on a cable suspension you need to jerk like an idiot.
 

ScareCrow

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28 Jan 2019
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457
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South west
I've not made aquarium fixtures but have made a few hipster lights for people.
IMG_20220417_165652.jpg

I'd imagine 15mm would be sufficient unless you've got a seriously heavy light.
If you want to bend the copper you can do it by forcing sand into the pipe to stop it from kinking when you bend it but might be over complicating things for your design if you are happy with the fittings showing. Personally I think it'll look good. I'm also a big fan of the various patinas you can get with copper. If you cover it in salt and vinegar, it turns a lovely blue. You could then spray it with a clear varnish to preserve it.
 

Dogtemple

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22 Nov 2011
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191
Location
Brighton
If seeking a low cost option I would use 20mm metal conduit and bend using a bender and the respective former. You can buy the tube in a long enough length to do in one go and it’s galvanised, so wouldn’t rust from the humidity of the tank.

If you’re anywhere near Brighton you can buy/borrow my bender for 20mm tube, it’s a proper floor standing one so is relatively easy to use.


If wanting something sleek you could use smaller diameter stainless which will look really good, but takes a more expensive bender to do a nice job and the tube costs more. If you check my posts I made my own inflow and outflow pipes using half inch stainless pipe for my diy tank/stand/everything else. But have had to put the project on pause due to a baby coming along and stopping play.
 

shrimp_father_uk

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19 Apr 2022
Messages
3
Location
Hampshire


I've not made aquarium fixtures but have made a few hipster lights for people.
View attachment 186909
I'd imagine 15mm would be sufficient unless you've got a seriously heavy light.
If you want to bend the copper you can do it by forcing sand into the pipe to stop it from kinking when you bend it but might be over complicating things for your design if you are happy with the fittings showing. Personally I think it'll look good. I'm also a big fan of the various patinas you can get with copper. If you cover it in salt and vinegar, it turns a lovely blue. You could then spray it with a clear varnish to preserve it.
We use to patina alot of things used fishnet stockings for making patterns but also mustard was a great help in forced patinas
 

ScareCrow

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Joined
28 Jan 2019
Messages
457
Location
South west
We use to patina alot of things used fishnet stockings for making patterns but also mustard was a great help in forced patinas
I can't find the video I watched now but remember salt, vinegar, scrambled egg, elastic bands and as you say mustard being used to create various patinas. Also using something like nail varnish to mask off areas that you don't want to have patina, which can then be removed later to expose the clean copper beneath. It's amazing the colours and finishes you can create with copper.
 
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