emergent plants

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by Garuf, 11 Feb 2008.

  1. Garuf

    Garuf Member

    Messages:
    4,959
    Location:
    Leeds.
    Hello, are there any plants out there that will grow out of the surface of the water and remain undryed out and more importantly stay small?
    I'm looking at my tank and I think the added bonus of emergent plants would be an excellent bonus to the scape.
     
  2. TDI-line

    TDI-line Member

    Messages:
    1,535
    Location:
    Yaxley, Peterborough
    Not sure, i only really know of anubias and ferns really.
     
  3. George Farmer

    George Farmer Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,089
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Most plants will grow out of water. Only common exceptions are vallis, egeria and cabomba.

    Most nurseries grow their plants emergent.
     
  4. Garuf

    Garuf Member

    Messages:
    4,959
    Location:
    Leeds.
    That's very true, I was thinking I could fish out some of the E tennelus from my downstairs plant dump, I'll look into it.

    I've had plants become emergent before, but the tops soon dry out and die.
     
  5. George Farmer

    George Farmer Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,089
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    You can keep up humidity by sealing with cling film.
     
  6. Garuf

    Garuf Member

    Messages:
    4,959
    Location:
    Leeds.
    A nice Idea but It would look horrible.
     
  7. George Farmer

    George Farmer Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,089
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    or glass...
     
  8. Garuf

    Garuf Member

    Messages:
    4,959
    Location:
    Leeds.
    Thats true, I'll keep an eye out for something, this is my "learning" tank after all.
     
  9. Moss Man

    Moss Man Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    You could try Lilaeopsis macloviana, I have grown these emerged and mine were very thin and stretch up to about 12". I've found them very fast and easy to grow, plus they didn't seem to need any humidity on the emergent leaves at all. Tropica stock it too.
     
  10. fishgeek

    fishgeek Member

    Messages:
    117
    Location:
    west sussex
    my hygro is up through the lights gets a bit burnt by the heat from the bulbs and is adapting
     
  11. cjunky

    cjunky Newly Registered

    Messages:
    3
    i have a few groups of water wisteria which likes to grow out of my tank. So far it hasnt gotten out of control either as the leafe shape and plant behaviour changes quite dramatically once it emerges.

    not truly emerging but i also have a few tiger lotus plants which make nice lilly pads on the surface too.

    marc
     
  12. Tresbling

    Tresbling Member

    Messages:
    49
    Re:

    What type of hygro is this? :D

    I was going to ask the same question then i saw this thread. I have a small open top tank and want my background plants to leave the water a bit without flopping over and covering the surface, so sturdy stems would be good. Its only 8 inches deep so the plant doesnt need to be huge, would any hygros be worth trying?

    cheers
     
  13. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    4,430
    Location:
    Leamington Spa, UK.
    Lysimachia nummularia (creeping jenny) would probably grow quite well. I've been thinking about growing this emerged.
     
  14. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

    Messages:
    4,126
    Location:
    Aston, Oxfordshire
    I'll probably be H.polysperma.

    Sam
     
  15. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

    Messages:
    3,262
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Many of the Hygrophila corymbosa types produce strong emergent shoots that are quite resistent to drying out. At the moment on my Rio I have two Echinodorus 'Oriental' flower stems emerging from the water (and the holes at the back of the lid :wideyed: ) and getting ready to bloom.
     

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