"Fallen Wilderness" - New Photographs First big trim!

TDI-line

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Looks lovely Steve, it's coming together very well.

As Garuf said, you probably have a a common Algae eating shrimp in there, similiar to cherrys etc, who multiply very quickly, Amano's just don't release any young into non-brackish water. :rolleyes: Which is a shame, as i'd have hundreds by now. :D
 

REDSTEVEO

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:wideyed: Hi Guys, I beg to differ here if I may. The only adult shrimp that I have got in my tank are Armano shrimp, approximately 12 in total consisting of 7 females and 5 males. Every month or so the females are full of larvae literally hundreds. Mos of the time they just seem to be there one day and gone the next..........however 8) Since I started doing the big water changes I have been using SERA Mineral salts and SERA KH Buffer and hey presto a few hours later theres hundreds of the litle things like tint water fleas bopping about all over the place. The adults are definitely Armano shrimp I have seen enough and kept them long enough to know what they look like.

One thing I will agree on though and that is they need a brackish water quality to survive, mine don't survive because the mineral salts only go in at the big water changes so the salts dissipate over time.

If I can get close enough with the camera to take a decent picture of one of the adult females I post a shot.


Cheers.

Steve.
 

REDSTEVEO

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Garuf said:
Not to me it doesn't why are you adding salt into your tank?!

I don't think it is salt in the true sense of the word (sodium chloride) but there is no doubt that it has an effect on the chemical properties of the water. I just looked at the bottle and it says it contains Magnesium, Calcium and K whatever that is. It has an affect and changes the microsiemens - electrical conductivity of the water which is exactly the same thing that salt does if you add it to your water. When I used to breed discus the higher the microsiemens - electrical conductivity of the water the less chance there was of the eggs hatching. The salt / mineral would penetrate the membrane of the eggs and they would all go white and fluffy.

Ray said:
Could you suck some up with a turkey baster and zap them into a brakish nano tank?

I did actually try this once as an experiment but even when I used a fine sponge filter over the filter inlet pipe the little blighters still got sucked into the sponge and died very quickly. If I was going to do it again I would probably just use an air pump driven sponge filter and do larger water changes. A bit of trial and error :) Feeding them would be difficult but I have used products for feeding the newly hatched brine shrimp for my baby discus which I think would do the trick. :D

johnny70 said:
Love this tank :D

Beautiful, riccia looks fantastic, how are you keeping it attached like that?

Cheers,
JOHNNY

I tied all the Riccia on to the wood and redmoor roots using monofilament fishing line and used hairnets to tie it down on to the rocks. Once it adapts to growing underwater bits of it get stuck between the hairgrass and the Tennellus and it spreads. This way it stays under the water by itself and does not need tying down. It does not have any roots so to speak so it won't attach itself to anything.

Cheers,

Steve
 

beeky

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Anything dissolved in water will increase it's conductivity - even sugar. The salts you've added are salts of Magnesium, Calcium and Potassium (the K). Table/sea salt is the salt of Sodium and is crucial. Otherwise It's a bit like trying to keep a clownfish in a tanganikan setup!
 

REDSTEVEO

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Wey Hey Beeky, well thats cleared that up nicely. Salt in a freshwater aquarium? :rolleyes: Whoever heard of such a thing 8) :lol:

Steve
 
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