Feeding ?

Discussion in 'Ponds' started by andy, 15 Dec 2007.

  1. andy

    andy Member

    Messages:
    261
    Location:
    Lewes, East Sussex
    Anyone else feeding their ponds in the cold snap. I haven't fed all week but today, my koi were like piranhas !!!!

    I'm a firm believer of feeding when the fish want it....and if that means feeding in low temps, then so be it.
     
  2. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

    Messages:
    3,262
    Location:
    Nottingham
    I think feeding in koi (and I'm sure other captive bred fish too) is almost a Pavlovian response - they hear the pellets hitting the water and they start feeding. This is used in fishing to catch fish by actually making sure feed splashes onto the surface.

    That does not mean that they can effectively use the nutrients and energy in them though. Below 8oC all advice is not to feed. I have fish in my pond outside and also in an indoor quarantine with digital thermometers. They still swim, but they won't be fed until the temperature is stable above 8oC. Equally though I'm sure the odd feed won't cause too much harm either.
     
  3. andy

    andy Member

    Messages:
    261
    Location:
    Lewes, East Sussex
    So when i walk past the pond, why are the koi virtually climbing over each other....presumably for food ???....i wish the carp and pike i fish for would throw themselves at me when i walked past the river bank.

    If the fish are hungry and actively looking for food...then feed them...it's nature's way of telling you that they're hungry :rolleyes:
     
  4. CJ Castle

    CJ Castle Newly Registered

    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Uk...
    When the water temperature falls below 8-10'C, a fish is unable to digest its food because its digestive track becomes inactive and continued feeding will result in serious health problems. Even if the Koi seem hungry (which they always do), you'd be doing more harm than good by feeding them in Winter...
     
  5. Dan Crawford

    Dan Crawford Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,266
    Location:
    Daventry, Northants
    i'm sure your fish will associate you walking past the pond with feeding time, thats why they come to the surface when you walk past.
     
  6. andy

    andy Member

    Messages:
    261
    Location:
    Lewes, East Sussex
    This is becoming quite a myth these days. If this were true, we'd be hearing many many stories of unexplained deaths and internal bacterial diseases in koi. I've been feeding my fish for many years at those temps and below and if the fish can't digest its food, i'm sure i would've known about it by now.

    I was discussing it on koichat.com the other week and most of the experts on there continue to feed until the temp reaches around 6 degrees.

    To tell you the truth, i find the above statement a little startling and could possibly jeopordise the fish's health during the spring when the bugs wake up a good 10-14 days before the fish's immune system does. By keeping feeding, that immune system is just a little more prepared for those diseases.

    Are you telling me that if the water temperature never goes above 8 deg from October to March, the fish don't get fed ?
     
  7. RENITA

    RENITA Newly Registered

    Messages:
    1
    FEEDING

    Feeding time is probably the most enjoyable and rewarding pondkeeping activity. However, when you feed your fish is as vital as what you feed them.Water temperature determines both the quality and quantity of food offered. Koi should not be fed when temperatures fall below 8oC as research has shown that koi cannot digest their food at these temperatures. Resist feeding during isolated warm sunny spells in autumn and spring. A lower protein diet should be offered as temperatures fall to 8oC heading into winter and when they rise above 8oC in spring. Lower protein diets are generally easier to digest and a higher protein content is not required at these times as fish are not actively growing at these temperatures. Fish should be fed what they will eat in 5 minutes.
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    RENITA

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