Filter Media for Hi Tech Shrimp-only Nano

Discussion in 'Inverts' started by Chris Stokes, 17 Apr 2015.

  1. Chris Stokes

    Chris Stokes Member

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    I'm currently in the planning phase of a shrimp-only high tech nano. I'm either going to be using a Fluval G3 or an Eheim Ecco Pro 200. Is there any filter media that is strongly advised? And similarly, is there any to avoid?

    I'm still undecided about what to stick in it, but currently its either Snowballs or (if my budget allows) King Kongs or Pandas.

    Any other pointers you guys have on top would also be greatly received!
     
  2. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    Put a big pre-intake sponge on the filter. It will give a browsing surface for the shrimps, and stop debris (and shrimps) ending up in the filter. Have a look at: <"Coarse........"> & <"Another flow ....".>.

    cheers Darrel
     
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  3. Chris Stokes

    Chris Stokes Member

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    Ok, thanks. I was going to get a stainless steel mesh guard to put on the intake to do this. I suppose its form vs. function.

    My question relates more specifically to what to put in the baskets inside the canister, e.g. ceramic balls, activated carbon and the other wealth of medias out there.
     
  4. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    Very much, it really depends how worried you are about aesthetics and how much maintenance are you going to do. In my case it is "I'm not really" and "not very much" respectively.

    But I don't think there is any argument that sponges form a very good grazing surface for shrimps in a way that a stainless steel guard doesn't.

    Inside the canister you can really have what you like, as long as it doesn't impeded flow too much. I like the Eheim "coco-pops" (Substrat Pro), but only if I don't have to buy them. Hydroleca, alfagrog or pumice are good and cheap, and I like the floating cell media as well.

    cheers Darrel
     
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  5. Andy Thurston

    Andy Thurston Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    a low tech approach would be better. its a very fine line between uncomfortable and dead where shrimp and are concerned.
    i suppose it depends how much experience you have with pressurised co2, especially in small tanks, finding the right balance can be pretty tricky
     
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  6. EnderUK

    EnderUK Member

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    If you're going to spend money on high grade shrimp then low tech is the way to go. My limited experience with shrimp in small tanks they really don't like the huge water changes you do with high tech tanks. (Thought you might be have a larger tank?) You also have possible issues trying to balance TDS with EI dosage levels though PPS-PRO might work though.

    As for sponge vs mesh. Go with black sponge, Shrimp love to pick through all the crap that collects in it. Filter media you just need something basic, coarse inlet sponge, minimum basic biological media such as a sponge, noodles, dish scrubbers, lego men whatever you choice of item you like your bacteria to grow on.
     
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  7. alto

    alto Member

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    I'd get the tank established with the Snowballs (or amanos), then add in the odd KK or Panda (pick out berried females to start & only 1 male).
    You can do the stainless mesh & have mosses for the shrimp for grazing - effective at trapping debris etc & esthetically appealing ;)
    Choose the filter than allows you the most flow control, either sounds as if it will have more than enough flow for a nano, even with traditional media including sponges & polishing media
     
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  8. Chris Stokes

    Chris Stokes Member

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    Thanks to everyone who has replied.

    I'm as much into aquascaping as I am shrimp keeping, so having a high tech tank is very important. That said, I have toyed with the idea of a low tech, cardinal shrimp biotope, but I decided against it until I'm far more experienced at shrimp keeping.

    To that end I'm going to start of with a neocaridina species, such as snowballs in an established tank once I get things going. And I'm going to go with a mesh inflow guard for aesthetics and balance with some moss on wood for the shrimp to graze.
     

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