Fluval FX5 vs Eheim 2080

Discussion in 'Filters, Filtration and Pumps' started by johnny70, 11 Apr 2008.

  1. johnny70

    johnny70 Member

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  2. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Johnny,
    I have the Eheim but I could just as easily have gotten the FX5 due to it's higher flow rate. What I would suggest though is to throw away the FX5 biomedia foam and to get sintered glass biomedia like the Eheim Effisubstrat.

    Cheers,
     
  3. johnny70

    johnny70 Member

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    Thanks Clive, that was the plan whichever one I decide on :D

    Cheers,
    JOHNNY
     
  4. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    Whys that?

    Johnny - you'd find this interesting

    http://www.fishforums.net/content/forum ... lstar-Xp4/

    Sam
     
  5. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Sam,
    The sintered glass media has a higher surface area so you theoretically can have a higher bacteria colony for biofiltration. Any filter filled with media will only deliver about 50%-60% of it's rated flow. This is normal due to friction and the pressure gradient if the pump sits much below the water line as it does in normal installations. You can argue ad nauseum about build quality, reliability, ergonomics and so forth but both filters are high quality and so the choice really boils down to price, filtration capacity and flow. The Eheim is so much more expensive. A higher filter capacity is an advantage but by the time you add media and connect diffusers and whatever other adjuncts, like UV, the flow rate fall-off starts to become a disadvantage. As long as you have enough bifiltration capacity, flow trumps capacity because you need to eliminate dead spots within the tank, to deliver nutrients/CO2 to the leaf surface and to remove waste products from the vicinity of the leaf.

    Cheers,
     
  6. johnny70

    johnny70 Member

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    Any reason not to use alfagrog?

    Seems like a much cheaper option than the ehiem stuff

    JOHNNY
     
  7. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

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    Alfagrog is a volcanic rock and has a high surface area, but nowhere near as high as sintered glass media. The sintered glass media also have a range of niches where microbes can establish, including anaerobic and almost anoxic zones and high and low flow zones.

    It'd do a good job, but not as good IME. It's also lethal on your hands when you're cleaning it!!!
     
  8. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    I'm sure we've been through the whole filter media argument many times, but what the hey, my wife's at work!!

    Surely, there is nothing a fancy filter media like sintered glass can do that a sponge cant?

    The mere fact that we are over sizing the filter means that any advantage of having a massive surface area due to s/glass is pointless? We also under-stock our tanks generally speaking there is less demands on the biological aspect of the filter media anyway. Also, if you find you need to use s/glass because the sponges are not providing enough surface area, your tank would be squeaking there would be some many fish in it!! :lol:

    Basically, I really don't understand this desire to spend lots of money on expensive filter media that need replacing when sponges will do?

    Just my £0.02 worth.

    Sam
     
  9. fishgeek

    fishgeek Member

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    my sintered glass is 7 yr's old now, so not too sure about the replacing statement

    then again so is the sponge between the noodles and glass...

    any media will slowly clog and become anaerobic in area's , this may possibly then act like a denitrator in those regions... not sure how the nitrogen outgasses in a canister though?

    andrew
     
  10. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

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    If that is the case, I take back my comment re replacing it :) I had thought it needed replacing every year or so as the pores clogged and that greatly reduced the surface area. Its easier to get mulm out of a sponge I would think.

    I guess any N gas produced would dissolve into the water and get taken out that way.

    Sam
     
  11. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

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    I've got some Siporax that I bought over 15 years ago that is just now starting to break up! Sponge isn't a bad media IMO, but I've found that I have much better results using filters where I can add a decent amount of sintered glass media. I think part of the advantage of this is produced by heating at very high temperatures (up to 1,300 degrees C according to one manufacturer) which produce fissures and rough surfaces of all sizes. These are supposed to form open cells rather than closed holes allowing water to flow through them.
     
  12. johnny70

    johnny70 Member

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    Well I ordered the Eheim 2080 about a month ago.but never got around to opening the box fully, just checked there was a filter and media pack in the box.

    Well, I have a dilemma, we finally got around to opening the box to check out the filter and IT'S THE WRONG ONE The idiots have sent me a 2078e instead, now the dilemma is the 2078 IS a slightly more expensive filter, but has less capacity for media a slighlty higher flow rate but a small recommended aquarium size at 700ltr as opposed to 1200ltr for the 2080. The 2078 uses less electricity >20w 2080 <40w.

    Now do I contact them and have to send the 2078e back and wait for the other OR keep this and be happy???????????????????????????????

    JOHNNY(wondering why he never looked at the filter box when it arrived)
     
  13. a1Matt

    a1Matt Member

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    I am curious - Is your dilema from a moral point of view or just which filter is best for you?

    If it is moral, I would phone them and ask if they mind if you keep the filter. If I were them I would say keep it as it would probably be more practical than incurring more shipping costs. I know I would always have a niggling voice in my mind telling me off if I just kept it without saying anything!

    If it is whichis the best filter, I don't have any thoughts!
     
  14. johnny70

    johnny70 Member

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    not a moral stand point no, just which is the beter filter

    JOHNNY
     

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