GH+KH RO Reminiralzation Product Help.

CJayT

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Soooo, i've been really wracking my brain here about the best product to use to remineralize my ro water. Ideally I wanted to raise both kg and gh. I have a 250ish L aquarium so want a relatively cheap solution. My water is high in nitrates (35-40ishppm) so cutting it with ro isn't really an option and salty shrimp is out of the question due to price. I came across Aqua Source GH and KH buffer and wondered if it would be a good choice even though it is aimed at ponds... Can't seem to find a list of ingredients though?
 

Zeus.

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Aqua Source GH and KH buffer and wondered if it would be a good choice even though it is aimed at ponds... Can't seem to find a list of ingredients though?
Salts are salts , but yes the percentages per mass if elements/compounds would be very helpful :thumbup:

My water is high in nitrates (35-40ishppm) so cutting it with ro isn't really an option
Why not - free NO3

Might be worth having a look at Fert Cal V1.6 beta works out the dkH and dkH form your water report and RO mix and has some salts you can use to get to your targets, if a salt/product isn't on which you would like to use give us a nudge and I will add it ;)
 

zozo

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Epsom is used as fertilizer as a Magnesium source, this will raise GH.

Baking Soda is a Bicarbonate that is used to raise KH.
Pond products sold as KH Plus is actually the very same thing it's Natrium Bicarbonate, but the package doesn't always specify the contents. It also can be bought as a cleaning Agent/Soda, the very same stuff for 3 different applications. In 3 different price ranges, just make sure it is Natrium Bicarbonate and you're good to go for raising KH

Pond and aquarium products soled as GH Plus contain Calcium and Magnesium. If you want to add Calcium only next to the Epsom you can use Calcium carbonate also available as a powder in most pharmacies.

:)
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
best product to use to remineralize my ro water.
Welcome, and look no further, you are in the right place. <"A DIY mix is the way forward">.

As the other have said once an ion is in solution it doesn't matter where it came from, and dry salts are just so much cheaper in the long run.
Might be worth having a look at Fert Cal V1.6 beta works out the dkH and dkH form your water report and RO mix and has some salts you can use to get to your targets
Job done. Another option would be an aragonite calcium carbonate (CaCO3) source, like <"oyster shell chick grit"> or <"cuttle"fish" "bone">.
My water is high in nitrates (35-40ishppm) so cutting it with ro isn't really an option
If you have a hard tap supply you can still cut your RO with tap water, you may only need 10% tap to give you some dGH/dKH.

One of the great advantages of planted tanks is that plants are <"extremely efficient at assimilating all forms of fixed nitrogen">, which means that you don't get a build up of nitrate (NO3-). I like a floating plant in all the tanks, partially because it has <"access to aerial CO2">, and partially because you can use it <"to assess water quality">.

cheers Darrel
 

CJayT

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Epsom is used as fertilizer as a Magnesium source, this will raise GH.

:)
Thanks for all the replies guys. I should have mentioned I intend to EI dose and I also have a fair bit of Seriyu stone in my aquarium. Think I might end up going the DIY route. I've ordered a TDS meter too going to aimfor 120-140. I'm not sure why i'm so afraid of DIY... I've heard people say they're always chasing the ph with bicarb?

Another thing(sorry), when I do a water changes with new r/o water that is remineralised... How do I go about keeping the water chemistry consistent and not end up over concentrating everything?
 

Zeus.

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Another option would be an aragonite calcium carbonate (CaCO3) source, like <"oyster shell chick grit"> or <"cuttle"fish" "bone">.
With the aid of my Fert calculator, I worked out how much uptake of CaCO3 there would be with its salt solubility saturation of 0.015 grams per litre at room temp.

which for my 484 litre tank would be a weekly dose of 7.26grams of CaCO3
upload_2020-4-18_16-32-1.png


So 'if' my maths is correct adding some CaCO3 in excess to any tank should yield the same results of ≈ 0.85°dKH and ≈ 0.81°dGH and if the CaCO3 is in excess it should maintain those minimum values
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
How do I go about keeping the water chemistry consistent and not end up over concentrating everything?
I use a conductivity (TDS) meter to give me a <"datum range where plant growth is acceptable">. Because you will be changing a large volume of water with EI you will probably find that you don't get a large salts build-up.
I've heard people say they're always chasing the ph with bicarb?
It is to do with pH as a measurement, the issue there is that <"pH is a really strange measurement">, and a lot of the conversation is based on the theory that all pH variation is dangerous and must be avoided at all cost. There is a certain amount of truth in this, but what it really means is that large changes in water chemistry aren't good for fish. The "pH stability" idea is to some degree fuelled by some (fairly misleading) advertising <"from the sellers of pH buffers etc">.

Where I would start is that in hard water large changes in water chemistry are required to change pH, but as the water gets softer this relationship breaks down, and by the time you get to pure H2O, pH is a meaningless parameter. Have a look at Diana Walstad's "Star Lake" section in <"TDS and remineralizing.....>.

I didn't know anything about CO2 injection until I joined this forum, but as soon as I found that the people who injected CO2 had a pH drop of one unit when the CO2 is on, followed by a rapid rise of one unit when they turn it off, and their fish were fine. From that I knew that it wasn't pH variation in itself that was the problem. When you add CO2 you haven't changed the alkalinity, you've just changed the <"amount of TIC"> and moved the CO2 ~ HCO3- ~ pH equilibrium towards CO2, and this <"extra dissolved H2CO3 has depressed the pH">.

Even in heavily carbonate buffered situations you can drastically alter the pH just by photosynthesis, in both <"eutrophic enough"> and <"fairly clean water">.

cheers Darrel
 
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