HC Cuba Seeds DSM

DanosCichlids

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I like that phrase, and we could use it a lot about various manufacturers' claims. :)
It pays to remember that people on here just want to help you, they're not trying to sell you anything. :)

Exactly the right idea, if you try to save a few quid you can make it much harder to succeed.
I spent like $170 on the full setup :)
 

Zeus.

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Yorkshire,UK
Firstly your plants are use to 400ppm and as soon as you flood and 'if' you get a decent 1.0pH drop they will have 30ppm, so the plants will have to change to this new [CO2] which cost them energy and time so the plants are able to uptake the CO2 at lower concentrations so having a long photo period is wasted and if the plants are unable to uptake enough CO2 they will be carbon deficient during this transition so are more likely to get pin holes and/or melt which will lead to breakdown products being released which in turn leads to algae issues.

Too much light only enables algae to thrive, plants in over high tech tanks only need about 5-6hours any moer than that is mainly for our viewing and algae will make the most of any light it can.

You have gone for an Iwagumi scape (which is the hardest) which has a low plant biomass so more light is available to algae. Tanks with ahigh plant biomass (lots off plants have less algae issues.

If you can dim or raise the lights at first this will help reduce the light intensity also which in turn will give the plants the time they need to adjust without suffering a photon bombardment they cant cope with yet and less light for algae. So If you can't dim or raise the lights it may be best to add floating plants like Frogbit which will help reduce the light intensity for the early days.

Clive goes into more detail below

We have a fairly well grounded, basic understanding of the photosynthetic processes.
A. We understand that Rubisco's job is to capture CO2 molecules and to deliver the molecules to the Calvin Cycle reaction centers. We know that Rubisco is hugely expensive and consumes a lot of resources to produce and to maintain. In low tech tanks, where the CO2 concentration is low there is a much higher density of Rubisco in the leaf because you need more of the protein to capture the small amounts of CO2. In gas injected tanks, the Rubisco density in the leaf is lower.

we know that when the plant senses that high concentrations of CO2 is available, it responds by reducing the production of expensive Rubisco. When it senses a lower CO2 concentration it must increase Rubisco production, however because this protein is so complicated and heavy, the increased production requires 2-3 weeks in order to change the density in the leaf to match the new gas concentration level. So it is much easier to reduce production than it is to increase production. When increasing gas injection therefore, it hardly takes any time to see an improvement in health. When lowering the concentration, the plant will suffer because it must now ramp up Rubisco production to account for the loss of CO2 availability.

When increasing the light, the plant must reallocate resources from Rubisco production/maintenance in order to deal with the increased radiation. This may entail new pigment production for protection. When the light is reduced, the plant then reallocates the light gathering proteins and can devote them to Rubisco production/maintenance.

So when we mess around with light and gas, we have some degree of predictability.
 

DanosCichlids

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28 Oct 2019
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Tasmania
Good to hear :D

What size tank do you have ? And light and filter as well.
It's a 60 litre tank but only about 50L is usable as it has a fake back with a sump style filtration system. The pump is 600lph. The light is a smd 12w white and some green LEDs. :cool: the switch unfortunately changes the output brightness Everytime it's turned on/off
 

DanosCichlids

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Joined
28 Oct 2019
Messages
59
Location
Tasmania
Firstly your plants are use to 400ppm and as soon as you flood and 'if' you get a decent 1.0pH drop they will have 30ppm, so the plants will have to change to this new [CO2] which cost them energy and time so the plants are able to uptake the CO2 at lower concentrations so having a long photo period is wasted and if the plants are unable to uptake enough CO2 they will be carbon deficient during this transition so are more likely to get pin holes and/or melt which will lead to breakdown products being released which in turn leads to algae issues.

Too much light only enables algae to thrive, plants in over high tech tanks only need about 5-6hours any moer than that is mainly for our viewing and algae will make the most of any light it can.

You have gone for an Iwagumi scape (which is the hardest) which has a low plant biomass so more light is available to algae. Tanks with ahigh plant biomass (lots off plants have less algae issues.

If you can dim or raise the lights at first this will help reduce the light intensity also which in turn will give the plants the time they need to adjust without suffering a photon bombardment they cant cope with yet and less light for algae. So If you can't dim or raise the lights it may be best to add floating plants like Frogbit which will help reduce the light intensity for the early days.

Clive goes into more detail below
Thanks mate that gives me a good explanation. As my C02 setup has a solenoid if I plug that into the light switch I'll only get 5-6 hours of C02. If I plug it in full time the plant will only use what's available in light hours from what you say. My light can be dimmed from the on/off switch it has 3 stage dimming.

As for the iwagumi style I selected that for the simplicity and functionality. The slant was created so all the feces get pushed down to the inlet of the sump and rocks to create hiding places for the fish. I actually want to add more foreground plants but finding it hard to get cultures here in Tas. I could add plants later once flooded but animal tuckerbox always has snails in theirs and I don't want snails. Plus I don't know if it will cause die off for the ground cover if I add more plants. Not sure what to do. I do like the look of a nicely planted tank though but not too overgrown
 

DanosCichlids

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Hi,

Liquid carbon is not really a substitute for co2 gas. Yes it helps as an algaecide and modifies the plant slightly to make it easier for them to absorb and store co2, but as a form of carbon it is pretty poor.

On your scale, if co2 gas is 10, I would suggest liquid carbon is 2!

Have a look at some co2 installation videos for aquariums. It is very easy to do and it’ll change the hobby for you imo. I know it did for me!
Cool no worries mate, I have listened to everone here and invested in a C02 Setup ;)
 

DanosCichlids

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Messages
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Location
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I like that phrase, and we could use it a lot about various manufacturers' claims. :)
It pays to remember that people on here just want to help you, they're not trying to sell you anything. :)

I like that phrase too.
I know people here are only trying to help everyone has been great :happy:
 

DanosCichlids

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IMG_20191029_221457.jpg
Zeus there is still that one spot up the top where the leaves don't seem to have fully matured. They haven't opened up completely and gone that lush green colour like the rest of the carpet :grumpy:
will they eventually fill out? It's been 10 days now since I started it
 

Zeus.

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Yorkshire,UK
will they eventually fill out? It's been 10 days now since I started it

Dont think it really matters either way, as the other MC will soon fill it in either before flooding or shortly after IMO, its one of the higher zones so probalbly dried out first, but as you carpet spreads and thickens up the carpet will slow down the water loss and the MC will spread more.

It looks very lush :clap:

As for the iwagumi style I selected that for the simplicity and functionality.

But its also the hardest to keep on top off and control algae, at least you used MC instead of HC :thumbup: HC even trickier to on top off.
 

DanosCichlids

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Dont think it really matters either way, as the other MC will soon fill it in either before flooding or shortly after IMO, its one of the higher zones so probalbly dried out first, but as you carpet spreads and thickens up the carpet will slow down the water loss and the MC will spread more.

It looks very lush :clap:



But its also the hardest to keep on top off and control algae, at least you used MC instead of HC :thumbup: HC even trickier to on top off.

Cool no worries.
Thanks for the lush comment, I don't think I've done too bad for my first attempt :woot:
The camera makes it look worse than it is it's actually only a couple of small areas.
I liked the MC small found it very petite and pretty it look more like a grass lawn lol.
With the algae most tanks I have slight problems with them to start off with but Once I get them established and set to my regime I get almost zero Algae problems to the point of where i might give the glass a slight rub once every 3-6 months and they look perfect (that's without any plants at all)
 

DanosCichlids

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[/QUOTE]But its also the hardest to keep on top off and control algae, at least you used MC instead of HC :thumbup: HC even trickier to on top off.

This tank hasn't been wiped down in about 2 months. It's crystal clear apart from Algae that grows on the white quartz sand
IMG_20191101_015024.jpg
 

DanosCichlids

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Tim Harrison

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I think you just need an adaptor. Contact CO2 Art I'm sure they can supply one.
Maybe one of our more knowledgable members will hopefully offer up some advice in the meantime.
 

DanosCichlids

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I think you just need an adaptor. Contact CO2 Art I'm sure they can supply one.
Maybe one of our more knowledgable members will hopefully offer up some advice in the meantime.

Oh this is so confusing. I wrote to them and they replied with this

Your best bet if you can, is to get the one which you have swapped for a normal FE so that you don't have to mess around with adapters . If that is not possible then you would be needing something like in the picture.

In most countries like Europe, Oceania and Asia the connection is called BS341 / DIN477 / W21.8x14, but also you may find other names like AustralianStandard Type 30

Hope this help you.

I can't work out what i need. looking up the part that they suggested BS341 / DIN477 / W21.8x14 the Australian adapter is sold out and I can't find it anywhere else. Dosen't look like ill be setting up C02 anytime soon
 

Kalum

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Scotland
i'd personally just get another FE, the more connections you add the more fail/leak points are possible
 

Kalum

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It Cost me $60 AUD. This is turning out to be a big waste of time and money

Are you not able to return? It's frustrating at times but don't be disheartened, just think longer term if possible and set yourself up for the easiest time going forward

An adaptor will work fine if it's the cheapest and easiest option for you
 

DanosCichlids

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Tasmania
Are you not able to return? It's frustrating at times but don't be disheartened, just think longer term if possible and set yourself up for the easiest time going forward

An adaptor will work fine if it's the cheapest and easiest option for you
Nah stupid me bought one off ebay for 60 shipped when I could have gone to Bunnings and bought the same size one for $40 but it has the same fitting. I measured both the nut and bolt seems like a 20 x 15mm male to male conversion. Did some googling and found out that Reece plumbing sell these
Nipple Hex Reducing Brass 20mm x 15mm
Web_1200x900-Nipple-Hex-Reducing-Brass-20mm-x-15mm.jpg
Im off to Reece in the morning ;)
I do get frustrated quite easily especially after spending all that money, it not fitting then thinking I couldn't buy an adapter.
Hopefully this will be my solution and I'll be bubbling away tomorrow if all fits and seals up well. :clap: Looks like a perfect fit but won't know till tomorrow. Fingers crossed for me :thumbup:
 

lazybones51

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Northamptonshire
Nah stupid me bought one off ebay for 60 shipped when I could have gone to Bunnings and bought the same size one for $40 but it has the same fitting. I measured both the nut and bolt seems like a 20 x 15mm male to male conversion. Did some googling and found out that Reece plumbing sell these
Nipple Hex Reducing Brass 20mm x 15mm
View attachment 128865 Im off to Reece in the morning ;)
I do get frustrated quite easily especially after spending all that money, it not fitting then thinking I couldn't buy an adapter.
Hopefully this will be my solution and I'll be bubbling away tomorrow if all fits and seals up well. :clap: Looks like a perfect fit but won't know till tomorrow. Fingers crossed for me :thumbup:
It would be worth checking the thread pitch as well, I'm pretty sure the regulator will be W21.8x14, so a standard 20mm (BSP?) fitting won't work.
 

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