How often to deep clean a planted tank?

Surya

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Big water changes work for my tank, been doing them religiously every week for years and fish are incredibly healthy and long lived, breeding like crazy etc. I don't have shrimp and parameters are matched. Clean water = good IME ;) Every tank is different of course, do what works for you.

I will experiment with different approaches eg the turkey baster. Got one in the Christmas box which is coming out on Sunday...
 
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I don't deep clean any soil substrate. I just vac around the stones where detritus builds up and where there is cosmetic sand and top it off with some new now and then.. Just shake all your plants thorough blast mosses/carpets with a turkey blaster and remove dead plant's/leaves. Just try to keep up with weekly water changes keep your co2 stable if you have any, and not too long light on 8hrs is good enough.
 

MJQMJQ

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Depends. I certainly do far less changing of water on my low tech shrimp breeding tank. But that system is minimal fuss and low bioload so anymore is kind of moot. I change water for the opposite outcome to the killing of shrimp, it easily adds calcium and mangnesium to the water due to the tap water qualities where I live. Helps the shrimp with shedding.

The ten high tech systems I help maintain receive up to 90% water change a week. If maintenance is being performed throughout the week then this may happen more than once a week.

Point is the amount is arbitrary. We do clean our high tech tanks, amongst other things, the water change helps prevent the circumstance you outlined before:



The other end of the scale is what @dw1305 outlined:



Another way of creating a relatively stable environment with a means to support life. Different methods for dealing with a range of setups; low energy to high energy. An explanation of the qualities of zones of REDOX would be far better served by someone with more knowledge on the matter.



Not quite understanding the question. I haven’t seen the OP’s tank so there isn’t really a comparison or judgement I can make here. As for what I do, the sanded area is literally on the bottom glass of the tank and a few mm’s depth. A lot of detritus falls into this area and makes removing it easier (if that’s what you want to do and if it’s necessary).
90% water change?I use dechlorinated tap water and the ph can fluctuate by abt 1 so not possible for me.Are u using ro/di water?
 

Geoffrey Rea

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9 tanks tap water (very high gH and kH, over 400ppm TDS) and 1 tank RO/tap mix to 120ppm TDS @MJQMJQ
 

Parablennius

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I havn't deep cleaned my current tank in its 3+1/2 yrs. flow is sufficient to carry any detritus over the weir where it's filtered out.
When I used to clean substrate in other systems, this was the best tool ever and it's home made. Cheap as chips. Airlift tube from a U/G filter plate, reduced to a smaller bore pipe. This allows you to probe the large bore down into the substrate, which "boils" around but doesn't get sucked up due to the reduced flow but the detritus will syphon out.
 

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Geoffrey Rea

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Don’t want to hijack the thread so will restrict this to one post.

My shrimp hates it sometimes even when 50% water change is done.

What are you using as evidence that your shrimp hate large volume water changes?

Are they perishing? Or just going into hiding? If it’s the latter Amano and Cherry shrimp can/do moult with an influx of available calcium in the tap water and whilst vulnerable, without a hardened outer shell, seek shelter until it is regrown. This could be misinterpreted as being unhappy but is natural behaviour and a necessary process for them to grow.

I only ask as rather than looking to estimating a change in pH as a cause for a behaviour there are many alternative explanations to explore, unless they are perishing. Not saying you should ignore your personal judgement as your tap water and mine will be very different no doubt. For example, there could be a high amount of metaldehyde in tap water from agricultural run off, that shouldn’t be ignored if you intend to keep invertebrates in aquaria.

Another regular claim all over the net and on YouTube is that glutaraldehyde causes shrimp deaths. No one seems to correlate a very clean tank/plants/surfaces with less food/aufwuchs as a food source; less food for a colony of shrimp, potentially less shrimp...

Caveats to this are having a very heavily planted tank, with hardscape etc gives a mammoth surface area to graze. Putting glutaraldehyde into a sparsely planted tank is a very different scenario and will have a greater effect proportionately on food availability for your shrimp.
 

Zeus.

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I've suffered a little with bba recently and I believe that's partly down to me not removing damaged plants and rotting leaves and not deep cleaning enough.



I like the look of this bit of kit, @Zeus do you use this on your 500 litre?

Yes and No- I mainly just use the turkey blaster on my 500l with it being braced, but the turkey blasting does tend to move the AS and it gets to the lowest part of the tank near the glass, then I do find then the Dennerle Nano Gravel Cleaner comes in very handy to suck the AS up and reposition it elsewhere in the tank
 

MJQMJQ

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Don’t want to hijack the thread so will restrict this to one post.



What are you using as evidence that your shrimp hate large volume water changes?

Are they perishing? Or just going into hiding? If it’s the latter Amano and Cherry shrimp can/do moult with an influx of available calcium in the tap water and whilst vulnerable, without a hardened outer shell, seek shelter until it is regrown. This could be misinterpreted as being unhappy but is natural behaviour and a necessary process for them to grow.

I only ask as rather than looking to estimating a change in pH as a cause for a behaviour there are many alternative explanations to explore, unless they are perishing. Not saying you should ignore your personal judgement as your tap water and mine will be very different no doubt. For example, there could be a high amount of metaldehyde in tap water from agricultural run off, that shouldn’t be ignored if you intend to keep invertebrates in aquaria.

Another regular claim all over the net and on YouTube is that glutaraldehyde causes shrimp deaths. No one seems to correlate a very clean tank/plants/surfaces with less food/aufwuchs as a food source; less food for a colony of shrimp, potentially less shrimp...

Caveats to this are having a very heavily planted tank, with hardscape etc gives a mammoth surface area to graze. Putting glutaraldehyde into a sparsely planted tank is a very different scenario and will have a greater effect proportionately on food availability for your shrimp.
Failed moults and dead shrimp I cant match the parameters exactly so yea.
 
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