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How to stop Java ferns going brown

Ninjascape

New Member
Joined
26 Aug 2021
Messages
19
Location
Earth
Hi,
I have recently bought Javafern. They were a very nice green in colouration but unfortunately after a few days they have began to go brown.

I not actually to worried about this plant but I plant to buy more and would like to avoid this happening again. Is their something I am doing wrong?

Cheers ninjascape
 

ceg4048

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UKAPS Team
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
9,476
Location
Chicago, USA
Hi,
I have recently bought Javafern. They were a very nice green in colouration but unfortunately after a few days they have began to go brown.

I not actually to worried about this plant but I plant to buy more and would like to avoid this happening again. Is their something I am doing wrong?

Cheers ninjascape
Hello,
You've not supplied enough information about your tank. Browning in plants or any other structural faults is caused by poor CO2. Is this a CO2 injected tank? If so then there is an error in your CO2 technique. If this is a low tech tank the same applies, however, there is no way to make adjustments to CO2 therefore the avenue to explore is excessive lighting.
The more light we uses the more CO2 is needed. Java Fern and ferns in general do not appreciate excessive lighting and respond poorly if an appropriate amount of CO2 is not provided. Nevertheless, if the plant does not disappear entirely there is a chance that it will grow new leaves more adapted to a submersed life and to a lower CO2 availability.

Cheers,
 

Ninjascape

New Member
Thread starter
Joined
26 Aug 2021
Messages
19
Location
Earth
Hello,
You've not supplied enough information about your tank. Browning in plants or any other structural faults is caused by poor CO2. Is this a CO2 injected tank? If so then there is an error in your CO2 technique. If this is a low tech tank the same applies, however, there is no way to make adjustments to CO2 therefore the avenue to explore is excessive lighting.
The more light we uses the more CO2 is needed. Java Fern and ferns in general do not appreciate excessive lighting and respond poorly if an appropriate amount of CO2 is not provided. Nevertheless, if the plant does not disappear entirely there is a chance that it will grow new leaves more adapted to a submersed life and to a lower CO2 availability.

Cheers,
Sorry the tank is 64 literzl, no c02, fluval smart led light, fluval stratum for Substrate.
 

ceg4048

Expert/Global Moderator
UKAPS Team
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
9,476
Location
Chicago, USA
Sorry the tank is 64 literzl, no c02, fluval smart led light, fluval stratum for Substrate.
Hi,
Thanks for the information. yes, with non-CO2 injected it is very difficult sometimes to save the plants. One method you might consider is to float the plants in the tank for a week or two before planting. Plants that we purchase from commercial suppliers are typically grown out of the water , which makes their care and storage much cheaper and which makes them more robust for transport. When you chuck them under water they start to suffocate because they have difficulty obtaining oxygen and CO2. In a properly injected CO2 tank it is comparatively easy to resuscitate damaged plants, but in a non-injected tank leaving them on the surface triggers the plant to begin their transformation to a submerged life, while at the same time giving them access to oxygen and CO2 while floating at the interface of air and water. This is a good idea regardless of whether the plants are damaged or are normal.

Cheers,
 

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