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IAPLC 2010 Results are out

aaronnorth

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Mark Evans said:
samc said:

what?!! :wideyed:

OK, the foreground is a tad over grown, but for goodness sake, 1230?... get real judges.

Thats what I thought, the tank is immaculate and much better than a lot of others.

Here is mine at 1147. I have dropped a lot of places but at the same time there was 700 more applicants and the scape wasnt as good as my last one IMO.

4722120298_8d31d98196.jpg

I do like AGA though for the comments. :thumbup:

Thanks, Aaron
 

George Farmer

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I've lost a lot of faith in the IAPLC to be honest.

The Top 100 are usually amazing, and these are judged via an international panel. Beyond that, and certainly beyond the 400 mark, there are some very questionable rankings, in my humble opinion.

Seeing Graeme's entry being apparently disqualified, and these poor judgements, I question whether I will so actively promote next year's IAPLC and concentrate more on the AGA and AAC.
 

Mark Evans

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George Farmer said:
I've lost a lot of faith in the IAPLC to be honest.

The Top 100 are usually amazing, and these are judged via an international panel. Beyond that, and certainly beyond the 400 mark, there are some very questionable rankings, in my humble opinion.

Seeing Graeme's entry being apparently disqualified, and these poor judgements, I question whether I will so actively promote next year's IAPLC and concentrate more on the AGA and AAC.

it's what i've been saying for ages now.

JamesM didn't even enter and got ranked!
 

George Farmer

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Mark Evans said:
JamesM didn't even enter and got ranked!
I may be able to explain that. When James ented the AGA 2009 there is an option (uncheck a box during the application stage) for the AGA to automatically enter you into the following year's IAPLC.

samc said:
i think my ranking was a little lower than i expected, but this has made me want to do better.

i am thinking of new ideas that i never used too. maybe something a little different in the next few tanks ;)
That's an excellent attitude, Sam. I had similar perspective with my 898th place (with only 1,100 entries!) in the 2008 IAPLC, although I did moan a lot more than you! :lol: All the best with your future 'scapes!

I will probably continue to enter the IAPLC myself. Despite the questionable rankings and ambiguous rules, I do still like to compete and see how I rank compared to my contemporaries.

My aim is to get Top 100 within the next five years! I think it can be positive to have a focus like this, as an aquascaper. And until the IAPLC organisers fully clarify the rules on previously published work, I'll continue to share my aquascapes, as appropriate in an attempt to promote the UK aquascaping hobby. That's my primary aim, after all.
 

Mark Evans

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George Farmer said:
My aim is to get Top 100 within the next five years!

it's doable mate. A similar aim for myself also. I'm sure in 5 more years, our knowledge should be up there with the best.

one of the reasons I don't enter now, is because of current scapes of mine are just no where near up to scratch for the top 100
 
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I think that the far east and europe have a very different concept of design, and that it is easy for us westerners to unknowingly create something which contradicts the eastern rules of design.
Perhaps by studying the principles of Zen gardening and oriental culture in general one could specifically target the IAPLC. It could be intersting as a one off, however I feel it's important not to let the contests govern the design of our scapes, we should produce the work we want to and if it is well recieved then all the better.

Personaly I doubt whether I will ever place near the top 100 as it seems the IAPLC is more about large nature aquariums and my scapes never fall into those categories.
I am perfectly happy with my placement of 608 this year just as I was with 1056 last year, but i am much happier about my AAC contest placements.

Heres my photo "A Door to the Cove" (16litres)

4878627652_560da7c872_z.jpg
4c A Door to the Cove 2.1 by James Marshall2, on Flickr

Cheers,
James
 

Mark Evans

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James Marshall said:
Personaly I doubt whether I will ever place near the top 100 as it seems the IAPLC is more about large nature aquariums and my scapes never fall into those categories.

An extremely valid point James. I never really considered that, but yes, it could well put some brits out the frame...apart from Zig and Graeme when the time arrives.
 

keymaker

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James Marshall said:
I think that the far east and europe have a very different concept of design, and that it is easy for us westerners to unknowingly create something which contradicts the eastern rules of design.
My point exactly! I do totally agree.

A very smart man teaching buddhism at a Hungarian university (he also is a dedicated japanese gardens expert) once told me that in order to be successful at oriental gardening (or aquascaping) contests, you just need to know their compositional rules. A rock formation does not appeal in the same way to a japanese judge then to us. You just need to know those rules (knowingly or unknowingly) to use or bend them.

It might or might not mattered for example in your particular example, but if that opening would have been placed in a golden ratio point you would probably have more points at an ADA judge. Same with other stunning scapes quoted here. No criticism meant here, but while they are really appealing to my eye (and I would have judged them higher in our Hungarian competition for example) - the lack of strong visual points and "connections" - lines - so to say might lead to point deduction. Obviously, when I apply to a competition like that, I have to face the facts, that they have an evolutionary line that my creation will have to fit in. I do however agree that there are some judgmental issues over the top100 but hey... ;)
 

JamesM

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George Farmer said:
Mark Evans said:
JamesM didn't even enter and got ranked!
I may be able to explain that. When James ented the AGA 2009 there is an option (uncheck a box during the application stage) for the AGA to automatically enter you into the following year's IAPLC.

Ah, yes, that may explain it.

Crazy that it was accepted though, as it was also entered in 2009 and ranked 1156! Maybe if I enter it in 2011 it'll make the top 500! :lol:
 
A

Anonymous

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General rules regarding composition that you'll find in any painting/photography handbook is sufficient, beyond that Amano doesn't say we have to mimic Japanese gardens, even him doesn't do that. This is the mistake/trap any could fall in. Good composition and originality ranks higher, this you all should aim for the next contest.

Composition
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compositio ... al_arts%29

Principles of Art
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principles_of_art

What you should do, what should I do, is to think about original layouts (we need some European feeling in our design), draw them accordingly to the composition rules and then start wetting your hands, also forget to trim the plants like an English lawn. :lol: If you are poor on ideas go outside, nature is full of inspiration.

Least but not last aim for the first 27 'scapes beyond that doesn't matter if you are the 200th or the 1000th and of course don't forget to have fun! :)

Cheers,
Mike
 

Shadow

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James Marshall said:
I think that the far east and europe have a very different concept of design, and that it is easy for us westerners to unknowingly create something which contradicts the eastern rules of design.

That is not entirely true. There are 16-18 judges and around 7 of them are Asia.

I think more interesting question (at least for me) is how does Amano shortlisted 100 photos for international judges to judge. Does he him self pick the photos? in this case it is up to Amano taste :D which kind of subjective :(
 

zig

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Shadow said:
James Marshall said:
I think that the far east and europe have a very different concept of design, and that it is easy for us westerners to unknowingly create something which contradicts the eastern rules of design.

That is not entirely true. There are 16-18 judges and around 7 of them are Asia.

I think more interesting question (at least for me) is how does Amano shortlisted 100 photos for international judges to judge. Does he him self pick the photos? in this case it is up to Amano taste :D which kind of subjective :(

Thats what I was going to say, only 8 of the 18 judges are from Asia the rest are from mainly Europe with a couple from the USA, and dont forget this years winner is for the first time from outside of Asia as well.

There is a good picture in last years 2009 IAPLC contest book of amano basically catagorising all of the entries laid out on the floor of a large hall type area, I'd this gives a good insight of how its done I would say. He basically chooses the top 100 aquascapes for final judging and catagorises the rest into probably 100 aquascapes at a time until he gets to the final positions. I suppose if as we consider him as the ultimate master of aquascaping, which most of us do, then his judgement should be pretty good! Do I agree with how it done? well not entirely but thats how its done, personally I think creativeity can go a long way in this contest.
 

a1Matt

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The link that Victor posted earlier in the thread (the interview with Karen Randall) gives a good insight into the judging process... she mentions that the judges give their opinions, but the final decision is by ADA.

Personally I would prefer solely the judges decision, but if it is going to be on one persons head (as Peter alludes to :) ) then I would want that man to be Takashi Amano! :) We can not forget, it is his competition after all!! :lol:
 
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There have been some interesting posts made here.

I see your point Peter, the top 100 will be judged by a broader panel, however they will still be subject to IAPLC criteria. Those outside of the top 100 will be judged to some extent by what Mr Amano considers to be good composistion by his own cultural standards.

To address some of the other points

Personally I believe there are massive differences between the design ethos of different cultures, we only have to look at architecture across the world to see this.

I do not believe that placing focal points a third of the way along the aquarium is a prerequisite of good composition. In fact I wonder if this “golden rule” could be a misinterpretation the “Golden mean”.

The Golden mean is a ratio of 1 to 1.618 and was discovered by the ancient Greeks and revived in Europe during the renaissance. This ratio occurs frequently in nature and is what Fibonacci used to deduce his series of numbers.

Examples of the Golden mean can be seen in art and architecture throughout western Europe and is normally displayed as an aspect ratio. Interestingly when people in this country are shown a selection of rectangles of various aspect ratios they will usually pick the one closest to the golden mean as the most aesthetically pleasing..

In relating this to aquascape design I feel quite lucky in that my eye naturally looks for a 1 to 1.618 ratio. I do not use a ruler to construct my scapes as I find this stifles creativity. However in passing a ruler over “A Door to the Cove” I found that the Golden mean is present in several places, a few are marked on the image below.
4897499484_89cba61de9_z.jpg
Golden mean by James Marshall2, on Flickr

Cheers,
James
 
A

Anonymous

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Well not quite James .. your focal point is in the middle :D

33cw1ts.jpg


Cheers,
Mike
 
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clonitza said:
Well not quite James .. your focal point is in the middle :D


Cheers,
Mike

Sorry to correct you Mike, but at no point did i say that the focal point of scape was or was'nt at the centre or whether it mattered.
I was simply attempting to suggest that there is a lot more to composition than placing focal points a third of the way along the tank, and that I am much more concerned with the inclusion of the "Golden mean" with respect to general proportion.

If we look at the landscape painting "The Alley at Middelharnis" by Meindert Hobbema we can clearly see that the focal point is almost exactly at the centre, yet the art world of western europe consider this to be a masterpiece. Surely this is worth some consideration.

Cheers,
James
 

keymaker

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I agree with you James. It really does not matter if the focal point is in the centre or at golden ratio... Take island compositions for example. Strong and stunning visual effects can be achieved - and that is usually done by using the gifts of the scaper that you call "a lot more to composition". I guess that's where the "secret lies".

While there are many ways to "construct a view" I personally always use the analytical approach - the "know your lines" way. (We had a discussion on this before and I said there that respect to those who for example operate with gut feelings. I'm just not the type, but let's leave that out for now...)

Focal points in red, triangles in black, golden ratio grey:

jamestest.jpg


Please excuse me for the quality of the quick photoshop work, I only did it for illustration purposes!!! Very important: I do not consider the "new" version better, more balanced, finished or anything like that. I only wanted to let you know what I meant by "know your lines".

For me every picture is a series of anchor points when I watch it, my eye wanders between these points and this movement will give you a strong impression when you evaluate something you see. Subconsciously.

Do the big guys bend those rules, play with them? Obviously. But in virtually every case I can prove you with the same lines that the viewer was "compensated", "conforted", "got explained" somewhere on the picture for the visual glitches the creator has placed over the image.
 
A

Anonymous

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James don't get me wrong, your aquarium is beautiful and very well done. :thumbup:

I wanted to say that at IAPLC most of the judges are also photographers so some rules from this point of view does matter. Another thing that makes an aquascape a winner I think is the ability of the aquascaper to immerse the viewer in their work, make his aquarium look bigger than it is using the right kind of plants and hardscape.

In my opinion what could you do now is to elaborate a bit your aquascape adding a few more plants. See the 25th place from last year competition to get you started.

If you want after the winner scapes are published we could start a thread and judge the scapes from our point of view. I think is a good exercise for the next competition.

Of course this is my opinion and I could be wrong but I try to learn more by talking to you guys.

Cheers,
Mike
 
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