Is low co2 better than no co2?

Discussion in 'Carbon Dioxide (CO2)' started by aaronnorth, 1 May 2008.

  1. aaronnorth

    aaronnorth Member

    Messages:
    3,955
    Location:
    worksop, nottinghamshire
    as above, what do you think?

    Also why we are on co2, i have 1 x nutrafin on a 180l/40g tank and the DC is green, it is putting out 6BPM - i am really confused about this?
     
  2. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,952
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Hi Aaron,
    Yes, in my opinion low CO2 is better than none at all. I'm assuming you are asking within the context of a low light tank right? If you are talking about a high light tank then that's like asking if it's better to get run over by a lorry than by a train. You will always get better growth by adding carbon. It is an essential nutrient, and while the plants can configure their chemistry to deal with almost nonexistent levels, their growth will be enhanced by the addition of even a small amount. This also assumes that the low level is stable. If low and unstable you risk getting BBA.

    I've never used a nutrifin system so I'm not sure what you are asking here. :oops: Are you saying that the bubble rate seems too low and that the dropchecker should be blue with that bubble rate?

    Cheers,
     
  3. aaronnorth

    aaronnorth Member

    Messages:
    3,955
    Location:
    worksop, nottinghamshire
    1 nutrafin canister is reccomended for 75l so yes, i am expecting it to be blue. It is high tec tank but i was going to buy a FE and make a pressurized system but i am turning this tank into a cichlid tank and putting the pressurized system on my 60l. :D
     
  4. Wolfenrook

    Wolfenrook Member

    Messages:
    336
    Location:
    West Midlands UK
    The Nutrafin systems are a bit of a waste of money, I have 2 of them. The canisters are too small to produce a decent amount of CO2, and the bubble ladders get blocked really easily which causes the bubbles to just dash for the surface.
    These days I use DIY, with the outlet passed through a venturi on a small water pump mounted low down in my tank. This produces tiny bubbles constantly which spend quite a long time swirling around in the water column because of the current from the pump and also from the outlet of my external filter.

    I did vary from the usual DIY instructions slightly, I used 2 litre pop bottles instead of 1 litre ones, and doubled the incredients. This way it produces a lot more CO2 and works better for my 180l tank.

    Oh and in answer to the original question, in my opinion any CO2 is better than none at all.

    Ade
     
  5. aaronnorth

    aaronnorth Member

    Messages:
    3,955
    Location:
    worksop, nottinghamshire
    I diffuse it out of a glass ceramic diffuser anyway, much neater
     
  6. plantbrain

    plantbrain Expert

    Messages:
    1,949
    Obviously none is bad, no plant growth is then possible other than KH break down.
    But rather than none or low or high etc, stable might be a better concept.
    Stable low CO2 levels allow plants to adapt, they also will do the same at high levels of CO2.

    But if you send the CO2 levels all over and have high/low oscillations, then you get algae and poor plant health.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  7. Themuleous

    Themuleous Member

    Messages:
    4,126
    Location:
    Aston, Oxfordshire
    I guess it depends on the lighting level, but for low light tanks than guess some CO2 can only be a benefit compared to no CO2.

    Sam
     

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