Living in a flat with tanks.

Gill

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Joined
17 Mar 2008
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3,217
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Stenson Fields South Derby
So in the near future house move number 5 in 3 years. It will be a 2bed flat this time.
I have never lived in a flat and want peoples advice on where best to position the EA600. It will be in my bedroom, and assume it needs to be on the strongest joists. How do you find this out. Would this be in the plans in the deed etc.
Don't really want a flat, but budget is what it is. And and don't want to move any further away from my son in Coventry.
My council tax is currently nearly 170 a month, so need to downgrade to a cheaper area.



On a side note anyone else's council do this.
We have bin inspections here regularly and each bin day they go thru the bins to check it is all ok. And if not they don't take the bin and label what was wrong and which bin it should have been in.
Once a piece of cardboard fell from the card receptacle into the main bin and they did not take the bin. That is how petty they can be.

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PARAGUAY

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13 Nov 2013
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Lancashire
Not aware of bin inspections but it has to be a good thing esp with paper /bottle recycling as employees at recycling centres probably not nice to find general waste in the mix and defeats the objective .I am really surprised more public buildings dont have separate waste bins these days. Living in a flat @Gill think we had a member (cant find the thread) falling foul of landlord restrictions ) having to remove their aquariums! "One man's ceiling is another mans floor" so definitely get to know your neighbours and try to get on. A good local approved construction company would advise on the load bearing on floor. Years back many flats apartments use to house large central heating tanks before combos so you could be ok
 
Joined
25 Dec 2018
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230
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United Kingdom
If you’re renting, beware. Most landlords wouldn’t let a tenant have a tank that big. Every night you will breathe out a litre of water (or so I’ve been told by agents), your tank will probably do a similar amount. Without proper ventilation, you’ll have mould very quickly.

Bin collections sound pretty strict where you are. My bins weren’t collected once because they were more than 2 meters from the pavement!!!
 

Simon Cole

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25 Dec 2018
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469
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Buckingham
When I leased rooms and rented, I have never found this to be a problem. If it is a small family estate that you a renting from, then a pleasant letter introducing yourself and talking about your hobbies is a great way to go. I don't think that larger estates are that bothered, you simply need to talk to the agent during the viewing. It is going to be around 135kg, plus rocks, frame, lighting and a bit of your weight. Although BS6399-1 is a later standard for wooden domestic first floors, as a rule of thumb, a weight of about 130kg per square metre should be fine, and 140kg is the typical loading for a single joist. You will find that floor boards will show nails in the direction of the joists. It would be better to position the tank over two joists; they are usually at 600mm centres. However. I would simply lay some floor boards on the carpet above three of the joists, and just be prepared to explain the loading when they pop round. Humidity and condensation are two different things. But to tackle condensation you simply need a warm fan. Tenants are not held accountable for either because minimum building regulation standards must apply to all houses leased in the UK, not least the part concerning ventilation, and this duty was statutorily discharged fully to the owner. You just need to paint over any patches if they turn up. Your agreement will make arrangement as to pets. You might append that you will keep a small fish tank before you sign this and send it back. There is no real way to find out which joists are strongest. They tend to rot from the external walls, and weaken considerably if they were not treated for woodworm. This means that you cannot guarantee that the floor will be strongest over narrower spans. In order to get a proper inspection you would need to drill holes and use an endoscope. In my house it would come through the ceiling due to existing rot and water damage.
 

Gill

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17 Mar 2008
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3,217
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Stenson Fields South Derby
Cheers All, Wont be renting. will buy a flat. And then look at buying the leasehold in the future as a possibility.
Looking at a new build flat or one within 10-15 year age. Also will be keeping an eye on the Auctions in the surrounding areas. As you can get a good price sometimes. Albeit a bit more costly in terms of fees etc.
Will def check with agents when viewing, in regards to what can be kept. Have a viewing booked for next week for a 2 bed new build flat.
Yes ventilation will be key so will look to improve that most definitely. And will make sure I have HG Mould Spray to use if it does occur.
 

Fisher2007

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19 Feb 2018
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432
Location
Warrington
If a new build it won't be timber joist. Will most likely be concrete floor or beam and block. Both of which will easily carry the weight of a tank. If your tank is approx 135kgs that's no different to a big guy stood in a room (or two small adults next to each other) and you'd never question the strength of a floor in that scenario

I used to keep a 500 litre tank in a first floor flat years ago. It had a concrete floor and at first I was worried. I got comfortable on the basis that if me and 4 or 5 mates where stood right next to each other in a room would I ever worry about the floor strength
 

russchilds

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Joined
8 Jun 2009
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194
Location
London
I own my flat. It has concrete floors. I've had a 240 litre aquarium for 14/15 years now with no problems. It's against the external wall. It has a hood so not open top but never had any issues with mositure or mold. Our communal bins are very strict on recycling etc. They won't take them if there's a problem.
 

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