Low Light, Low CO2 Nano plants?

NeilW

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Any recommendations for low-tech plants for nanos? Could we possibly make a list?

I'll start with;
Moss
Anubias Bonsai
Staurogyne sp.

Cheers!
-Neil
 

ghostsword

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I wouldn't say that Staurogyne is low tech, it needs good light, and with good light you will need CO2, then with CO2 you will need nutrients.

I would setup the nano with Crypto's, they do good on low tech, and some of them are really good looking.
 

spider72

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Bolbitis heudelotii compact
Cryptocoryne retrospiralis
Riccardia chamedryfolia (minipelia)
all mosses
Subwassertang
most anubias species
 

AdAndrews

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crypts are an excellent species for the lower tech tank.

I wouldnt say mosses though, personally, mine dont take off unless lighting is good.
 

NeilW

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Cheers everyone! I just wanted to simplify things for my next scape so I could cut down on liquid carbon and also grow things without an uphill struggle. Lots of planning to be done, but thats given me something to think aboot :thumbup:
 

ghostsword

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saintly said:
ghostsword said:
Aren't all of these high light plants?
yep :p and are flourishing in my low light,non co2, no ferts and no W/C nano.
Do share.. How? It just happens like that?

I got Staurogyne, and it is doing very well, but I got fertz, lots of light and lots of CO2... I want to setup a small tank, 30cm cube, so if you know a way to keep this plant in low tech, please share.. :)
 

JamesM

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There's no real secret - the substrate is nutrient rich so the plant is getting all it needs for the condition its living in. Eventually it will need a small amount of ferts adding to the water column, but I'm sure it'll be fine for a long while. I have some in my low tech 60 litre shrimp tank, under a 6 or 7 years old 18w T8 light. It grows well, but as Paulo said, very slowly with a smaller leaf size.
 

ghostsword

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So this may be the reason my Staurogyne is getting long leafs and quite tall..

I will move it to a smaller tank, tie it to some rocks and see if it gets more compact.
 

ceg4048

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Yep, It all starts with light. Low light, low (or no) CO2 required, low nutrients required. No CO2 means we can get away with no water changes. We get into trouble when we go mad and throw megawatts at a tank. Somewhere, hidden in The Matrix there is a secret school that programs the denizens to use massive photon torpedos over their tank. It might be the same school that guy Harry Potter goes to. Have you ever noticed he's never graduated? The world's oldest middle school student. Anyway, he uses a magic wand to get loads of light over his tank, has a lifetime of algae, and just can't sort it out... :shh:

High light is an accelerator of growth, it's not a prerequisite. Lighting levels are very tightly linked to required levels of CO2/. Massive lighting therefore means massive levels of required CO2/nutrients to support the acceleration.

Cheers,
 

JamesM

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ceg4048 said:
Yep, It all starts with light. Low light, low (or no) CO2 required, low nutrients required. No CO2 means we can get away with no water changes. We get into trouble when we go mad and throw megawatts at a tank. Somewhere, hidden in The Matrix there is a secret school that programs the denizens to use massive photon torpedos over their tank. It might be the same school that guy Harry Potter goes to. Have you ever noticed he's never graduated? The world's oldest middle school student. Anyway, he uses a magic wand to get loads of light over his tank, has a lifetime of algae, and just can't sort it out... :shh:
:D
 

ghostsword

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JamesM said:
Well, it is a stem plant afterall...

http://ukaps.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=111168#p111168

In a high light setup it will require regular pruning and replanting to get the best out of it.
That is my issue now.. I don't have space for more Staurogyne, bought four pots at ADC last month, one set was sandwiched between two pieces of wood, the other three just too over..

Will have to setup another tank for it... It can be tied down to rocks, right?
 

ghostsword

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ceg4048 said:
High light is an accelerator of growth, it's not a prerequisite. Lighting levels are very tightly linked to required levels of CO2/. Massive lighting therefore means massive levels of required CO2/nutrients to support the acceleration.
Cheers,
I think that the balance is getting plants that grow at the same level, and the best way to do that is to try new things.. For example, to mix Hygrophila Corymbosa and Rotala rotundifolia is a bad mix, at least for me, the Hygro just grow's too fast and will take over a tank. Same as with Indian Fern.

For some plants high light is required, at least if we want to see them at their best, while others need less to do more. :)

Is light a magic wand? Just by itself it isn't, but add nutrients and CO2, and you can have the most amazing plants on your tank.

It is nice to have the choice, low light and low co2 plants are also nice. Look at Crypto's and Anubias? They have some of the most beautiful specimens.

I just didn't know that one could also condition other plants to those specifications, and I am not sure that you will see the best of a Rotala on those conditions, although I have not tried it yet.
 

spider72

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AdAndrews said:
I wouldnt say mosses though, personally, mine dont take off unless lighting is good.
I think, in case of mosses, CO2 or liquid carbon availability is more important than higher ligth level, as they can't use carbonates as CO2 source, as far as I know. Just my opinion, as I have had many mosses in the past in LT tanks, but not all species obviously.
 

JamesM

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ghostsword said:
I think that the balance is getting plants that grow at the same level, and the best way to do that is to try new things.. For example, to mix Hygrophila Corymbosa and Rotala rotundifolia is a bad mix, at least for me, the Hygro just grow's too fast and will take over a tank. Same as with Indian Fern.

For some plants high light is required, at least if we want to see them at their best, while others need less to do more. :)

Is light a magic wand? Just by itself it isn't, but add nutrients and CO2, and you can have the most amazing plants on your tank.

It is nice to have the choice, low light and low co2 plants are also nice. Look at Crypto's and Anubias? They have some of the most beautiful specimens.

I just didn't know that one could also condition other plants to those specifications, and I am not sure that you will see the best of a Rotala on those conditions, although I have not tried it yet.
Actually, you'd be surprised at what you can grow in low light and no co2. Rotundafolia does fine in my shrimp tank - it even takes on more of a red than under high light. I also have riccia, blyxa, p. helferi, acicularis, and walichii, all of which grow very well indeed. Just a little slower.

As for mixing plants that grow at different rates, well that's all down to your pruning and maintenance, nothing to do with light levels. Amano likes to mix crypts with riccia, which obviously grow at very different speeds, but with correct pruning, etc. these plants gel perfectly... A tank of his with balansae and acicularis was said to be 'complete' by some after just 3 months, but it took years to get a full back wall of balansae, and only then was it photographed.
 

ghostsword

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Thanks James, good information and one to keep in mind on the next tank I will put together, as it will be harder to keep up with it.

The pruning, you are right, it has definitely to do with maintenance, but also with skill, which I have not mastered yet.

I have some Rotala Walichii and Rotundifolia on my main tank, with lots of light and CO2, plus nutrients, will take a couple of stems and start a small tank with just 11W of light.

Many thanks for your reply.
 
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