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Ludwigia peruensis ?

eminor

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Hello, is this ludiwgia peruensis, i'm not sure ? if yes, does that plant is really hard to grow ? flowgrow seems to tell me that the plant will have hard time in my hard water, i hope it's not as hard as walichii thx
 

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_Maq_

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Yes, it is Ludwigia glandulosa, indeed. (L. peruensis is an incorrect name, widely in use.)
And yes, this Ludwigia requires acidic water, low in carbonates. In such environment it's not difficult. A beautiful plant, growing straight up like a fir.
If your water is hard, it may still live with the help of CO2 injection and advanced iron chelates.
 

eminor

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Yes, it is Ludwigia glandulosa, indeed. (L. peruensis is an incorrect name, widely in use.)
And yes, this Ludwigia requires acidic water, low in carbonates. In such environment it's not difficult. A beautiful plant, growing straight up like a fir.
If your water is hard, it may still live with the help of CO2 injection and advanced iron chelates.
Thanks, one day after planting, i have new growth, co2 is perfect, will see how it goes. ph is ~6.5 24/7

what do you mean by advanced iron chelates ? i use DTPA iron
 
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_Maq_

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what do you mean by advanced iron chelates ?
Stronger than EDTA. Personally, I'm normally using iron citrate (or iron chloride, which is not a complex salt at all). Upon using these, Ludwigia glandulosa was unable to take up iron (or use it) in neutral-to-alkaline water. Neither zinc. But somebody here (don't recall who and where) demonstrated with picture that this species can be kept in hard water with CO2 injection, and presumably with the help of some stable chelates of iron (possibly DTPA? - let us know).
 

eminor

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Stronger than EDTA. Personally, I'm normally using iron citrate (or iron chloride, which is not a complex salt at all). Upon using these, Ludwigia glandulosa was unable to take up iron (or use it) in neutral-to-alkaline water. Neither zinc. But somebody here (don't recall who and where) demonstrated with picture that this species can be kept in hard water with CO2 injection, and presumably with the help of some stable chelates of iron (possibly DTPA? - let us know).
Thanks that's a usefull information, i'll keep the topic updated, it'll maybe help someone
 

eminor

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Here's an update and my observations, we are two weeks after planting, that plant is a slow growing plant, she seems to like light really a lot. On this tank i use 3000K + 6500K t5ho bulb which tend to make red vibrant, not the dark red that plant should be, she seems in a correct health i think

nutrients weekly :

NO3 : 20 ppm
PO4 : 5 ppm
iron : 0.3 ppm
calcium : 130ppm
magnesium : 30 ppm
 

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_Maq_

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looks like she need tons of light to keep the bottom leaves red ? or might be the absence of co2 ?
At the bottom, the light intensity is diminished, that's clear. Secondly, the lowest leaves come from the time when she lived emerged in plant nursery. But I consider a success that the plants did not throw off not a single old leaf!
Strong light supports coloration. But also CO2 injection does. Plants well supplied with CO2 restrict creation of chlorophyll (because less chlorophyll can produce the same amount of photosynthates), but anthocyans are produced in the same amount. That makes CO2-fed plants intensely reddish. (And it's a matter of taste whether you like it or not. Me, I like it just to the degree which can be achieved without CO2 injection. Ludwigia glandulosa is my favourite, looking just like you can see on the picture.)
 

eminor

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Quote
At the bottom, the light intensity is diminished, that's clear. Secondly, the lowest leaves come from the time when she lived emerged in plant nursery. But I consider a success that the plants did not throw off not a single old leaf!
Strong light supports coloration. But also CO2 injection does. Plants well supplied with CO2 restrict creation of chlorophyll (because less chlorophyll can produce the same amount of photosynthates), but anthocyans are produced in the same amount. That makes CO2-fed plants intensely reddish. (And it's a matter of taste whether you like it or not. Me, I like it just to the degree which can be achieved without CO2 injection. Ludwigia glandulosa is my favourite, looking just like you can see on the picture.)
Is it possible to get intense red in low light condition if the co2 is supplied to the plants or is it just a big boost in coloration when the light in high ?

i haven't thinked about the fact that the botom was emersed form, great job
 

_Maq_

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Is it possible to get intense red in low light condition if the co2 is supplied to the plants or is it just a big boost in coloration when the light in high ?
I wonder. Both light and elevated CO2 work independently in the "red" direction. The mechanism is the same - less chlorophyll is needed. But I have no experience with CO2, so it's the others who could answer your question better.
 
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