My new plants!!! - how to plant??

Mr Bee

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I've recently added some light to my tank, not having any before, in an attempt to bring back and revive my spiky moss which was dying off. Its slowly working, as I can see some new green growths on it.

Then I decided I wanted to add some more "real" plants, so called in at the LFS today and got 3.

1) Anubias barteri var. nana
Anubias.jpg


2) Hygrophila corymbosa 'Siamensis 53B'
Hygrophila2.jpg


3) Unknown!! - There was no tag in this one, and the assistant in the LFS knew nothing about fish or plants!! Anyone know what this is?
Unknown2.jpg

Unknown1.jpg



I need some help with how to plant them...... I have gravel substrate, but do I just leave them in the pot, and shove the pot into the gravel and bury it in.

Or do I remove the plant from the pot and just bury the roots (and the foam the roots are wrapped in??) into the gravel?? - will the plant stay there, and not come out?, as its not exactly like being planted into soil.
 

Simon D

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The large gravel of yours is not ideal for planting.

The anubias sould be attached to wood or rock/slate and the roots not burried.

Plant No 3, the nearest guess I can come up with is "Limnophila aquatica". I don't think it's Cabamba, but pic is not the best (no offence intended)

I'm sure others will be more informative, if not a bit of research of your own in the plant section of this forum may well help!
 

ceg4048

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Hi,
#3 is definitely not Limnophiia Aromatica, a discussion of which can be found on the thread: Limnophila aromatica - The Rice Paddy Herb but it could be Limnophilia sessiflora if it's not Cabomba.

Check the tutorials section for basic maintenance here: Pruning - A general guide to plant maintenance

Plants should always be removed from their pots and the synthetic wrapping should also be removed and discarded. As noted, the Anubius has a rhizome which will be revealed when the wool is removed and this rhizome should be affixed above the substrate such as on stone or wood.

If you've added light to you tank you might also consider adding some form of CO2 as well, whether thats via Excel liquid, yeast reaction cannister or regulated pressurized cylinder. The tutorial discussion of CO2 application can be found here: CO2 In the planted Aquarium

Cheers,
 

Simon D

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ceg4048 said:
Hi,
#3 is definitely not Limnophiia Aromatica,
Hi Ceg,

I thought the idea was to identify what the plant was not what it isn't, we could be here for ever going about it in that fasion, hehe!

I suggested Limnophila Aquatica not L. Aromatica

Pic of my suggestion:
varenr046.jpg

I agree it's definately not L. Aromatica and it's not lots of others!

L. Sessiflora is a possibility but my guess remains with L. Aquatica
 

ceg4048

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Oh hey Simon, it you...(is it really you?) :lol: A name change is pretty clever to avoid Empire Stormtroopers (kinda like when Obi Wan Kenobi changed his name to plain old "Ben" Kenobi) Sorry mate, I must have read your post using my Old Republic prescription lenses. Yep, never mind what I said, definitely could be L. aquatica...

Cheers,
 

Simon D

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You were lucky to get prescription lenses in the Old Republic. I had to settle for a couple of old whisky tumblers (those damned fish looked big back in them days).
 

ceg4048

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:lol: :lol: Well, as long as they fill the tumblers with whiskey first. Then that wouldn't be so bad...

Cheers,
 

Mr Bee

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Thanks for the replies everyone :D

I'll remove my Anubia from the pot and tie it onto some slate when I get home then (at work at the moment!), and I'll also remove the Hygrophila from its pot, and try and dig it into the gravel, and maybe weigh it down with a bit of slate too - does that sound like a good plan?

Regarding the last one, from the pictures posted, it does indeed look like L.Aquatica (I'll try and post better pics later), but this is currently in a proper little terracotta pot (which it came from the LFS in) - does this also need removing from the pot and planting into the gravel??, as a terracotta pot is not a 'temporary-looking' one like the plastic ones look like.

A large piece broke off this one, so I might try sticking that in too, and see if it takes :)
 

ceg4048

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Hi,
For optimum plant growth, direct contact of the root hairs with the substrate is necessary, therefore remove all pots, wrappings and other paraphernalia. There is nothing "proper" about a terracotta pot. This is yet another illusion of The Matrix. Kind of like the cat foods in advertisements that are made to seem appealing to humans. I mean, cats consider raw rat flesh to be delicious, so does their canned food really need to be embellished with fresh apples and cinnamon? :rolleyes:

Cheers,
 

Mr Bee

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I liked the little terracotta pot... :oops:

Well, on closer inspection, it actually had no bottom in, just a hole, so I've now took all the foam/wool wrappings off everything, planted the Hygrophila directly into the gravel, and also planted the L. aquatica through the pot and into the gravel, so its growing through the hole in the bottom of the pot, but actually planted into the gravel.

Here's a couple more pictures if anyone can confirm it is L. aquatica.

Plant1.jpg


Plant2.jpg
 

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