Myriophyllum mezianum turns brown

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by laurance, 2 Mar 2009.

  1. laurance

    laurance Newly Registered

    Messages:
    4
    I planted this plant a few weeks ago and everything was looking good for the first couple of weeks but in the last week the lower part of the stems and leaves are turning brown. I replanted it in a brighter postion on saturday, hoping that maybe it is not getting enough light, when I lifted the plant there was very little new root growth, normally I would get good root growth early after planting. I am using the EI method of feeding along with CO2 injection ( Ph7 ), heated substrate, 10 hours of light ( 2w/gl ). Anybody any experience with this plant or pointers to where I am going wrong.
     
  2. Simon D

    Simon D Member

    Messages:
    460
    Location:
    Leicestershire
    Not sure I can help but, what filtration are you using? Do you have any additional circulatory pump? It could be a problem with flow and the nutrients not reaching the lower growing stems.

    From what I've read the U/G heater won't help (but won't hinder either, just an unneccessary expence).
     
  3. cryptking

    cryptking Newly Registered

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    hereford
    Hi Simon
    Myrio Mezianum requires a nutrient rich soil, high light and CO2, so in theory you shouldn't have any problems. My only observation is that in Madagascar, it is found in marshes and grows emersed so maybe it doesn't last in a submersed form, perhaps one of the experts here can confirm/deny?
    Good luck, if you have a chance, why not try it partially emersed and see if that makes a difference
    Mike
     
  4. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,953
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Hi,
    Whenever a plant turns brown after submersion, a better assumption is always that it needs more CO2, not more light.

    Cheers,
     
  5. steve123

    steve123 Newly Registered

    Messages:
    9
    obviously pends if the plant was grown above or below water in the first place. I still believe a sudden change of inviroment be it emersed or submersed, can cause such a noticeable effect on existing leaf growth.
    Just remove the leaves showing this and new growth (species pending) should quikly begin to show.
     
  6. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Expert/Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,953
    Location:
    Chicago, USA
    Although an environment change can play a role, it's important to note that if a plant is placed in a more suitable environment than from which is was removed, then there is less likelihood of negative effects. in this sense, whether the plant was grown emmersed or submersed is immaterial.

    Browning and subsequent decay is almost always a direct result of CO2 deficiency. A plant grown emmersed is normally not CO2 limited, but upon submersion suffers an acute CO2 shortfall due not only to the waters lower content, but also due to the emmersed leaf structure which is optimized for growth in air and not in water. A plant moved after grown submersed has it's CO2 uptake mechanism optimized for the CO2 concentration of that water (assuming it was stable). When moved to waters with lower or less stable CO2 levels suffers enzymatic disruption and must re-calibrate it's CO2 uptake mechanism for the new CO2 levels. If the new concentration level is only slightly lower than the previous water then the adjustment is easier. If the new concentration levels are chronically lower than the threshold levels required for adequate food production then plant health tends to fail.

    CO2 levels in my tank are very high. Plants placed in my tank, whether obtained from an emmersed or a submersed source typically do not suffer the reported condition. The transition is typically seamless even if my tank environment radically differs from their previous locations (which it almost always does). In other words, newly placed plants in my tank begin to transition and to grow leaves immediately with little or no browning or decay. If browning or decay does occur, a CO2 injection rate increase resolves the issue. If I reduce flow and/or reduce CO2 the first casualties are lower leaves. Increasing the injection rate and/or flow results in regrowth of the leaves in the lower portion of the stem.

    Based on this strong correlation between CO2/flow and leaf loss, versus no observed correlation between environment change and leaf loss, I consider lower leaf loss a symptom of poor CO2 assimilation.

    Cheers,
     
  7. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    it's not that easy with this plant, it's that delicate pruning old leaves could do more harm.

    i found with this variety, it NEEDS co2 and do not starve of nutrients. i got next to nothing growth until i increased those 2

    4b94b41d.jpg

    this was about a week in, from the emerged to emerged state. like Clive says, i don't find stems suffer from the emerged to immersed transition.

    d1c0f1e4.jpg

    5b106c2d.jpg

    it's not the quickest of growers even with good conditions IME. but is very needy. you can see from the last image the pearling suggesting the higher amounts of co2...i really did pump it in border line stuff 8)

    you can also notice the old leaves have nearly all but gone, and the beautiful needle type leaves twinkle almost. it read a description once that it was like a Christmas tree.

    unfortunately the tank was pulled apart not long after this image, so i don't know the final out come.

    in answer to your question, i'm with clive. co2 and in my case more ferts and one more bulb.
     
  8. laurance

    laurance Newly Registered

    Messages:
    4
    Many thanks for the advice, will try increasing CO2 and ferts, the bulb is not just so easy.
     
  9. beeky

    beeky Member

    Messages:
    879
    Location:
    Chippenham, Wiltshire
    It's a tricky plant that's for sure.

    I bought a pot when it was first released and it lasted about 6 months. It did grow but very stringy and all the leaves below the top inch or so were brown and crispy. I was using DIY CO2 which probably wasn't a good idea.

    Just looking at your post, and you say:

    This implies to me that your using a pH controller with your CO2 setup? If that's the case, that could be where the problem is. pH Controllers are usually best set up at a very low pH so they prevent CO2 dumps as the canisters run out.
     

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