New to C02

James Burcham

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Joined
5 Jun 2019
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100
Location
Fargo, nd USA
I've started this thread due to the fact I've never operated a c02 injection system and will probably have many questions.

First off, is it normal for the bubble counter to have a faster rate when first turning on the solenoid?

It seems to slow down once pressure in the line and diffuser are built up.

My tank is 50 gal. I've been running tests for a few days now and it's looking like around 5 to 6 bubbles per sec to reach 30ppm over 3 hrs. Is this about right?
20190619_220315.jpg
 

Zeus.

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Joined
1 Oct 2016
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3,534
Location
Yorkshire,UK
First off, is it normal for the bubble counter to have a faster rate when first turning on the solenoid?

Yes - while the pressure builds up in the tubing

My tank is 50 gal. I've been running tests for a few days now and it's looking like around 5 to 6 bubbles per sec to reach 30ppm over 3 hrs. Is this about right?

Dont focus on the BPS as its just a means of the rate of co2 injection and not the amount of CO2 being injected.

My BPS is insane

FINE-TUNING CO2 is a great read that covers the topic well ;)

lots to read but about 2-3hours is normal dependent on your injection rate and surface agitation agitation.

Stable pH/[CO2] from lights on till CO2 is the key as Clive detail explains why below

We have a fairly well grounded, basic understanding of the photosynthetic processes.
A. We understand that Rubisco's job is to capture CO2 molecules and to deliver the molecules to the Calvin Cycle reaction centers. We know that Rubisco is hugely expensive and consumes a lot of resources to produce and to maintain. In low tech tanks, where the CO2 concentration is low there is a much higher density of Rubisco in the leaf because you need more of the protein to capture the small amounts of CO2. In gas injected tanks, the Rubisco density in the leaf is lower.

B. We also know that during Calvin Cycle, the fixing of Carbon involves some intermediate carbohydrate products until the final product is a type of glucose.

So, for item A. we know that when the plant senses that high concentrations of CO2 is available, it responds by reducing the production of expensive Rubisco. When it senses a lower CO2 concentration it must increase Rubisco production, however because this protein is so complicated and heavy, the increased production requires 2-3 weeks in order to change the density in the leaf to match the new gas concentration level. So it is much easier to reduce production than it is to increase production. When increasing gas injection therefore, it hardly takes any time to see an improvement in health. When lowering the concentration, the plant will suffer because it must now ramp up Rubisco production to account for the loss of CO2 availability.

When increasing the light, the plant must reallocate resources from Rubisco production/maintenance in order to deal with the increased radiation. This may entail new pigment production for protection. When the light is reduced, the plant then reallocates the light gathering proteins and can devote them to Rubisco production/maintenance.

So when we mess around with light and gas, we have some degree of predictability.
 

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