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(NO MORE) 2,000L High tech BEAST

Filip Krupa

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13 Oct 2016
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Little update.

Lights finally hung and operational.
20180714_191458.jpg
20180714_191558.jpg


Things to do before ordering plants:
- hardscape, next weekend
- co2, bought a used 2 stage regulator, just need the co2 tank to be delivered
- auto fert dosing, got everything, just needs connecting/programming

Thanks for reading
Fil
 

gltjc

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25 Jul 2016
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I am super excited to see this develop.

A huge group of tetras is going to look amazing. As you probably know rummynoses and serpae are going to create very different looks. Rummynoses are active swimmers that are more likely to form a conventional shoal and move together around the tank. Serpae won’t behave that way - they will be more stationary with the males staking out small areas of the tank and occasionally jousting for position.
 

Filip Krupa

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Rummynoses are active swimmers that are more likely to form a conventional shoal and move together around the tank. Serpae won’t behave that way

Thanks for the tip, I thought serpaes behave similarily to rummies!

I am actually becoming more hesitant about adding a massive shoal of tetras, out of a fear for my rcs.
Reason being, this tank will be very difficult to balance in terms of algea. My plan is to depend heavily on the voracity of my red cherry shrimp to help control BBA (they go absolutely bananas for any BBA I add to their tank). Currently, they are in a non co2 tank, with regular natural direct sunlight, and there is absolutely no sign of algea.

A 200-300 schoal of rummies would look insane, but i worry that it will cause algea issues.
Not sure what I will do yet!

Thanks for reading.
Fil
 

Zeus.

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1 Oct 2016
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I did briefly, but as I undestand this is best for getting demanding carpet plants to spread. Not planning on a demanding carpet.

Am I missing something?

so no undemanding carpet either ?
 

foxfish

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Am I missing something?
I don’t know, I have a have always enjoyed growing emersed plants, I find it very effective at establishing any of the popular plants we keep.
The algae free, fast growth is not only interesting to watch but allows roots to establish in the substrate or or hard scape.
 

Filip Krupa

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so no undemanding carpet either?

Dwarf sag. I grew it before, grows like a weed. Not sure if I would bother dry starting it.

Although, you guys are giving me ideas. I could dry start like a paludarium. Defo want bolbitis either way).

Ive a misting pump and set of spray nozzles i could install to drench'em all four times a day.

Thanks
Fil
 

Filip Krupa

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Afternoon guys,

Since these journals are meant to be warts n all, let talk about some. Namely, my cheap substrate - iron oxide blasting sand (copper slag).

20180730_184746.jpg 20180730_184729.jpg

I wanted cheap black sand, and since I couldnt find anyone who actually used copper slag to any disastrous effect, I decided to go against every scaremongering advice online, test it for myself, and risk having to rip out my tank to remove 400kgs of the stuff. You see, Im an all-in kinda guy, small patient testing is not for me!

I am told that copper is harmful to inverts (even under 0.5ppm), and this sand contains up to 1% copper oxide. *gulp*

I've a copper test kit that tells me the level of copper is currently undetectable.
The tank is going through the cycle (nitrite phase). Once thats complete, I will test for copper again, and put a small group of shrimp in.

This tank can be a very stressful project at times. I know Im not helping myself. :lol::lol::lol:

The way I see it, if the substrate kills my shrimp, there will at least be concrete experience online as to why not to use this stuff, as opposed to just scaremongering about copper.
If it works, I would have saved a penny, and fed my contrarian side!

Thanks for reading
Fil
 
Last edited:

Filip Krupa

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Invert testing in progress. Pics below.

Copper test kit now shows a very small presence of copper (aprox 0.1ppm, reading is hard).

I've added a "cage" with snails and shrimp.
Filled it up with algea on silk plants, and bio balls.

Adult shrimp seem healthy and very active, but shrimplets will escape through the mesh Might have to devise another test to see how the shrimplets do.

Snails are alive and prowling.

Thanks
Filip

20180805_082427.jpg 20180805_082444.jpg 20180805_082545.jpg
 

Filip Krupa

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Finally done some testing on co2 injection.

Initially planned to put the co2 through 2 home made bubble counters in parallel (bought ones have too little bubbles). But it appears the co2 prefers to go through one only, ignoring the other. Maybe someone who knows about gas dynamics would advise why?
Same with the co2 reactors which I am also running parallel, gas is only coming out into one. Any fluid dynamics wizzes around?

Furthermore, I filled the reactors up with bioballs first, and this seemed ineffective as they did barely anything to block the injected bubbles on their way out, whilst simulteneously impeding the flow of water which made the gas collect on top and slowly fill the whole reactor.
Ended up taking out the bio balls, and adding an air stone to the co2 line inside the reactor. This worked much better. Some gas still builds up, but gets pushed down by the strong flow of water, keeping the buildup minimal.

Happy so far, and was able to get the drop fairly green. (Not lime green)
Check it out for yourselves in the vid below.

Thanks
 

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