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dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
13,880
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
It sounds like at the end of the day this was a case of test kit accuracy issue.
You don't need a test kit for ammonia, if you have enough of it to be toxic, you will know. Ammonia is actually quite hard to test for, mainly because it is a dissolved gas. We struggle in the lab., even with an ion selective electrode.

It is pretty hard in a planted tank to get ammonia toxicity. I've never tried deliberately to raise ammonia levels using an ammonia based fertiliser like ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4), but my suspicion would be that you would need quite a lot of it in a planted tank to cause the death of the livestock.

People who keep huge carnivorous fish in an inadequate volumes of water, with a canister filter, no substrate and no plants have every chance of poisoning their fish, but for us it isn't really an issue.

cheers Darrel
 
Last edited:

RolyMo

Member
Thread starter
Joined
19 Jun 2012
Messages
430
Location
Fareham, UK
New phone, new pictures.
All shrimp seem to be healthy.
azuny5ej.jpg


7ejy7e9e.jpg


ydubyse6.jpg


ymy6uder.jpg


R
 

RolyMo

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Thread starter
Joined
19 Jun 2012
Messages
430
Location
Fareham, UK
Happy New Year to all on UKAPS. Hope you had a lovely relaxing Christmas break and NYE celebrations.
I know this year I hardly had to entertain instead being invited to everyone else's houses which has not been conducive of posting on the forum.

I have been lurking on the forum but I thought I would do my first post of 2014.

My first CRS shrimp tank is still going great guns. The shrimp all seem happy. I have seen the results of moulting so I am pleased with that. But I have not seen any shrimp berried, but then I understand that winter is not an ideal breeding season.

I have over the past 2-3 Months been seeing hair algae building up, most attaching the various types of moss in the tank. I removed the moss ball a while back just to create some floor space for the shrimp as the tank is heavily planted with plants, mosses and the wood.

I did look at the algae articles and got a little confused as to what to do to eliminate the hair algae.

The James C article linked in this forum says it is trigger due to low CO2 (check its a low tech tank), low nutrients (well I don't add additional nutrients), or Ammonia spike (hmmm not sure that is true after the last experience).

I am a couple of times a week using a tooth brush to remove the hair algae by twisting it around the brush.

Lights (0.5watts/litre) are on 11hrs a day.
I syphon off 20% water and replace with RO water with Salty Shrimp bee minerals.

Thoughts are to reduce the lights on time by a couple of hours, and perhaps add some EI nutrients

Any tips to get rid of this algae?

Today I did a bigger water change of approx 40% after doing some trimming of moss and plants.
Cheers
R
 

Lindy

Member
Joined
29 Jun 2012
Messages
2,823
Location
Ayrshire, Scotland
I'd reduce your light. My 2 tanks are lit for 6 and 8 hours.

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aliclarke86

Member
Joined
21 Mar 2013
Messages
1,488
I only have 5 hour lights on mine :) I'm sure I could up it a bit but its in the kitchen and the lights are on in there a lot anyway

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RolyMo

Member
Thread starter
Joined
19 Jun 2012
Messages
430
Location
Fareham, UK
Cheers Guys for the input.
I have reduced the time down to 8hrs to see if that reduces the problem
The tank has been moved to the living room now and sits on the same unit but is now oposite the fish tank. So the shrimp can now wave at the fish.

Incidentally I took a trip to the lfs at the weekend to get a replacement Ram for the fish tank and came back with that at 4 Chilli Rasbora's which I fell in love with. The Chilli's have been aclimatised and added the shrimp tank.
But what should you feed the Chilli Rasbora's as they are very small, and dont appear to see the normal fish food granules.

Still waiting for some shrimp to get berried. Concerned that they might die naturally before they breed.
R
 

MARKCOUSINS

Member
Joined
4 Dec 2012
Messages
389
Location
Lake Garda Italy
Cheers Guys for the input.
I have reduced the time down to 8hrs to see if that reduces the problem
The tank has been moved to the living room now and sits on the same unit but is now oposite the fish tank. So the shrimp can now wave at the fish.

Incidentally I took a trip to the lfs at the weekend to get a replacement Ram for the fish tank and came back with that at 4 Chilli Rasbora's which I fell in love with. The Chilli's have been aclimatised and added the shrimp tank.
But what should you feed the Chilli Rasbora's as they are very small, and dont appear to see the normal fish food granules.

Still waiting for some shrimp to get berried. Concerned that they might die naturally before they breed.
R
Hi,I feed my Chilli Rasbora freshly hatched brine shrimp every day.Can appreciate it is a bit of a hassle to allways have a brine shrimp hatchery on the go but my fish just go mad for them!It does improve the colour of the Chilli Rasbora too,yes they go even redder due to the brine shrimp:) Mine also take Tetra Pro colour(crunched up considerably!)but you can't beat live food for these little beauties!Remember to watch the TDS in the tank for your shrimp too(extra food,waste)even if they are tiny guys!Cheers Mark
 

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