Otocinclus fry!!! I can't believe it!

Discussion in 'Fish' started by daniel19831123, 14 Jun 2008.

  1. daniel19831123

    daniel19831123 Member

    Messages:
    736
    Location:
    Blackpool
    When I have sucessfully exterminated all my precious CRS even with RO water, my otocinclus has successfully bred in the same tank after neglecting it for 1 month! I thought it was some water flea initially till I look at it closer and the close resemblance to it parents and the style it sucks onto the wall, I'm pretty sure it's an oto fry! More picture to follow. Too bad I don't have a proper macro lens.
     
  2. TDI-line

    TDI-line Member

    Messages:
    1,535
    Location:
    Yaxley, Peterborough
    Nice one Daniel.
     
  3. Matt Holbrook-Bull

    Matt Holbrook-Bull Founder

    Messages:
    963
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    wow.. as far as I know, thats almost unheard of. Well done.
     
  4. daniel19831123

    daniel19831123 Member

    Messages:
    736
    Location:
    Blackpool
    I had a brief head count earlier on and I've found about 12 so far. there could be more hiding in bogwood and moss. Will update on the growth soon.
     
  5. aaronnorth

    aaronnorth Member

    Messages:
    3,955
    Location:
    worksop, nottinghamshire
    wow cant wait for pics,
     
  6. zig

    zig Member

    Messages:
    686
    Location:
    Dublin Ireland
    Otocinclus affinis are the hardest to tank breed but other variety's of Otocinclus are not that hard AFAIK, so I guess it depends on which variety of Otocinclus you have. Pretty cool anyway.
     
  7. Arana

    Arana Member

    Messages:
    1,054
    Location:
    London
    Nice one Dan :D
     
  8. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

    Messages:
    3,262
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Fantastic news. I've seen mine doing pre-spawning behaviour but never any eggs. It's a very rare event to get fry. Make sure they don't starve! It's often the case that captive bred fish are easier to breed than wild ones so your fish might be easier to breed once they mature! Good luck!
     

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