Outlet pipe routing

swackett

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29 May 2008
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439
Location
Epsom, Surrey
I'm wondering if i routed the outlet pipe from the filter firstly down to the cabinet floor then back up to the tank will effect flow/the pump?
 

Zeus.

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1 Oct 2016
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Yorkshire,UK
Any increase in the pipe length will increase the resistance of the pipe which in turn may decrease the flow, how much it decreases the flow is dependant apon if the flow is being restricted already. Shorter, wider bore pipes give less resistance so will give better flow. Then it depends on the power of the pump.
Can be tricky to now how much it will affect the flow especially with basically the short amount of tubing your adding. Just try and have a slow bend in the tubing and try it, especially if you have the spare tubing already.

Why did you want to have the tubing routed that way?



Sent from Mountolympus via neural interface
 

zozo

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16 Apr 2015
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Netherlands
I have a tank standing on the kitchen table and had the pump in a little cabinent agin standing left hand side next to the table. The lily pipe hangs right hand side of the tank. That was about 1,5 meter horizontal outlet hose with three 90° turns, an inline heater, ph senser and co2 diffuser, with a 4 meter head pump.. Pressure wise it worked perfectly, what it reduced in flow was acceptable. But still this counter pressure, or reduction caused the canister to trap air. After cleaning and filling it ran ok for a couple of days, than the traped airbubbles got sucked into the impeller and if this was to big the pump looses it's head pressure and runs dry. This makes a lot of noise and finaly also can damage the impeller shaft or even burn out the motor. It happened to me a few times over night, trapping a to big bubble and running dry for a few hours.. Waking up in the morning from hearing a squealing pump.

The only way to prevent this from happening is to make the outlet hose as straight, preferably vertical and short as possible.. :)
 

swackett

Member
Joined
29 May 2008
Messages
439
Location
Epsom, Surrey
Any increase in the pipe length will increase the resistance of the pipe which in turn may decrease the flow, how much it decreases the flow is dependant apon if the flow is being restricted already. Shorter, wider bore pipes give less resistance so will give better flow. Then it depends on the power of the pump.
Can be tricky to now how much it will affect the flow especially with basically the short amount of tubing your adding. Just try and have a slow bend in the tubing and try it, especially if you have the spare tubing already.

Why did you want to have the tubing routed that way?



Sent from Mountolympus via neural interface
I was thinking of routing the pipe down then back up so I could put the inline diffuser in the vertical bit of pipe created by this routing.

The filter is a Eheim 350T with 16/22 tubing as below.
 

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Zeus.

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1 Oct 2016
Messages
3,119
Location
Yorkshire,UK
I did the same with my setup to anable me to get all the heaters diffusers out of the tank too
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Tank being used as a room divider so limited space at the wall end too. The issue with AIr in pipes isnt an issue with my Fluval FX6 and it stops and restarts every 12hrs and clears all the air in the pipes/filter. You could program your timer so it stops for few minutes every day, but some motors dont like being stop/started on a regular basis, was chatting with 'ian_m' and he use to stop his at night whilst watching TV until he had an issue with it restarting.
 
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