p stellata

bazz

Member
Joined
24 Jan 2009
Messages
135
Location
Lincoln
hi,
could anyone enlighten me as to the life cycle of the above plant please?

3671681797_5f35ee4423_b.jpg


in the middle of that lot are a few stems which appear to have failed underwater flowering, seemed to have stopped growing in height but have 2 new shoots sprouting from the base of the stem.
i just wondered if it was time to cut off the main shoot and allow the new ones to grow?
cheers and thanx in advance,
bazz!
 

ceg4048

Expert/Global Moderator
Staff member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
8,955
Location
Chicago, USA
P. stellata can be a difficult plant if CO2 is sub-par. I have not ever seen it attempt to flower submerged, failed or otherwise. Like any stem, pruning leads to branching. Unlike most stems, pruning can sometimes lead to rapid decay of the removed branch as well as decay of the original plant. Sometimes it helps to cut the intended branch and float it for a few days before replanting.

There are also different versions depending on origin of specimens. The Tropica variety available in Europe is fast growing and is high quality. No idea from where it was originally collected though.

There appears to be no limit to level of nutrients in the water column it can absorb under high lighting. The richer the water the more spectacular and varied the growth, assuming CO2 is likewise unlimited. In rich waters though, it will soon become a monster and will take over the tank. This is not a plant that can be used effectively in delicate scapes or in small tanks. It's just becomes too unwieldy and obnoxious. It seems that only low light or restrained nutrient levels can keep it in check.

P. stellata grown under high light, high CO2 and in Hypereutrophic nutrient levels. On the lower left a shaded branch fans out. the higher branches have various colors and forms as they lay siege to a Ludwigia in centre.


Cheers,
 
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