pearling bubble.

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Mark Evans, 24 Jan 2010.

  1. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    i've got a similar shot in my nano journal, but here's a close up of a pearling bubble.

    ubermacro.jpg
     
  2. LondonDragon

    LondonDragon Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,298
    Location:
    London
    Looking good Mark, excellent shots mate, you will be giving Hristo a run for is money ;)

    What's the plant called? I have one similar but the leaves go all the way to the top, leaf stems are about 20-30cm long.
     
  3. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    thanks mate. not quite to his standard i don't think.

    i did notice mate. that tank is looking ace! i'm at a loss for a name for this plant. bit of a mystery it appears.

    the following plant is a common one though :D

    hydracotle.jpg
     
  4. john starkey

    john starkey Member

    Messages:
    1,593
    Location:
    worcester
    Hi Mark,
    lovely shots as usual,i am having trouble with printing at the moment,i sent some test pics away(dont print at home)first ones came back okish,next lot was really dark so i rang the guy up and he says in need to calibrate my screen with some soft ware,do you do any home printing and what if any calibration software do you use,i am on a new mac and i thought the screen was ok,whats your thoughts mate ?,
    regards john.
     
  5. LondonDragon

    LondonDragon Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,298
    Location:
    London
  6. NeilW

    NeilW Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Location:
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    Don't mean to butt in, thought I may add something. Your prints are coming back dark where your originally viewing them on a backlit screen. You can do a few basic things (for free!) which help. Change your colour profile to CMYK (I use US Web coated (SWOP) v2) which is what most printers use (i.e they print using Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Key inks). Also I find that turning my screen brightness down is more true to print as the screens on Macs are heavily backlit, LED, and glossy. I normally boost the contrast on my images too as backlit colour will always show more subtle changes in colour better.

    Colour calibration is a pain in the bum and unless you spend serious money and time you won't get it spot on. Theres so many variables - for example different paper stocks behave differently to ink, lighting which its viewed under blah blah blah. Pantone even sell a box which recreates different lighting conditions;
    http://www.pantone.com/pages/products/product.aspx?pid=265 :lol:

    Maybe worth giving that colorimeter a go though like Paulo linked to for £70 if its bothering you, I think I may eventually get one too!

    Hope any of thats helpful to you!

    Neil.
     
  7. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

    Messages:
    6,492
    Location:
    newark notts.
    I went the long and expensive way around John. I don't use any software, neither is my monitor calibrated.

    trial and error for me. way back when i did many prints for people, I ran loads of prints off my epson r2400 and basically fiddled from there. nothing has changed on my system so I now trust my eye on screen.....for my monitor at least. . The pro printers i used to use, also had epson printers, and they came out identical to mine.

    i've viewed some of my images on other computers, and the difference is vast! different contrast, colour tone etc. it's quite possible, my images look crap on my monitors.

    i've not printed anything in ages.

    maybe I should get my monitor calibrated?
     
  8. flygja

    flygja Member

    Messages:
    1,270
    Location:
    Penang, Malaysia
    Wanted to share my free way of doing things. Ask your printer what sorta printer and color profile they use. Try to get it from them or google the corresponding .icm file and install it. As for monitor calibration, I have a Dell IPS panel and googled the net for settings from people who have calibrated their monitors. It might not be dead accurate, but its free :thumbup:

    Lastly, make sure that your pics are in sRGB color space before sending it off for printing, as some monitors and printers don't do other color spaces well.
     
  9. Lisa_Perry75

    Lisa_Perry75 Member

    Messages:
    778
    Location:
    Southampton
    Gadget show did a review of different printers, with a massive range in prices. There was a massive difference in quality and it didn't relate to the price, strangely. I can't remember exactly what brands were good, but you might be able to look it up?
     
  10. Dave Spencer

    Dave Spencer Member

    Messages:
    1,389
    Location:
    N. Wales
    Having your photos printed opens up a whole new level in image quality. Images that are only seen on a monitor don`t come close to the look of the image once it is printed.

    I was due to buy a Canon Pixma 9500, but the cost of moving house soon put paid to that. :( I am, however, in the process of starting to save up again.

    Printed images rule. 8)

    Dave.
     

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