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Plant Profile Suggestions.

LondonDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
21 Feb 2008
Messages
11,252
Location
London
Hi everyone,

This thread is for members to submit plant profiles to add to the database, if you notice a plant is missing you copy the fields below, attach any photos to the post and submit a suggestion:

Scientific Name:
Common Name(s):
Family:
Genus:
Origin:
Type:
Placement:
Difficulty:
Growth Rate:
Height (cm):
Lighting:
CO2:
Other Uses:
Source of data (URL):

Attach photos to post via the upload a File button.

Many thanks :)
 

kadoxu

Member
Joined
24 May 2016
Messages
1,294
Location
Kingston Upon Thames
I think it can be useful, unfortunately I tend to forget it's even here when I'm looking for plant info.
Maybe something to call attention like a plant/picture of the month thread would make people come a bit more to this area of the forum and remind us all it's here for us.
 

david watson

Member
Joined
8 Aug 2018
Messages
40
Location
beccles
might be nice for the un-educated like me to have the plants picture with the list of names as i have no idea i just pic ones that look nice and then learn about them.
 

LondonDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Thread starter
Joined
21 Feb 2008
Messages
11,252
Location
London

LondonDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Thread starter
Joined
21 Feb 2008
Messages
11,252
Location
London
Haha clearly I’m not very good at this technology thing.
No worries, did take me a couple weeks to create that so hopefully it will be of some use to some people ;)
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,640
Location
Netherlands
Scientific Name: Anubias Barteri - ‘Variegatus’
Common Name(s): Dunno
Family: Araceae
Genus: Anubias
Origin: Greenhouse
Type: Epiphyte
Placement: Midground, Background
Difficulty: Easy
Growth Rate: Slow
Height (cm): 30 +
Lighting: Low
CO2: Nha!?
Other Uses: Salad
Source of data (URL):

 

dw1305

Expert
Staff member
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,530
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
Does any know if the variegation is caused by a virus or similar?
I don't know, but that "splashy" type variegation is often viral.

@Mick.Dk may know.

If it was a dicot plant, you could see if the variegation would spread to a green plant after grafting a variegated bit on, if it does it is viral in origin. I've done this with Abutilon pictum var. thompsonii (below), but you can't graft Aroids (or other monocots).

RHS_RHS-0005599_7029.jpg


cheers Darrel
 

Mick.Dk

Member
Joined
19 Jun 2012
Messages
1,516
Location
Dk
The 'variegata' is quite common in most cultivated plants. It is usually just a "mistake" where leaves do not contain chlorophyll in bigger or smaller areas, leaving white or yellow markings. Sometimes entire plants continue to grow this way. The white/yellow parts do not contribute to fotosynthesis, making such plants weaker and slower growing - some more visuable than others.
It must be said, though, that the 'variegata' in Anubias is usually very unstable, plant more often then not going back to original.
Hmmm - this time Darrel types faster :)
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,640
Location
Netherlands
What actualy is the common name for Anubias in English? If it has any..

In German and Dutch Anubias common name is Speerblat / Speerblad = Spear Leaf.. :) But in English a Spear leaf is literaly a spear leaf type of spear tip with no refernce to Anubias.
 

dw1305

Expert
Staff member
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,530
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
What actualy is the common name for Anubias in English? If it has any..
Just "Anubias" as both common and scientific name.

We have the scientific name as the common name for Sphagnum, Begonia, Rhododendron, Camellia, Magnolia (must be some more), but the only one I can think of where we use both generic, and specific, epithet as the common name is "Boa constrictor".

cheers Darrel
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,640
Location
Netherlands
Hi all, Just "Anubias" as both common and scientific name.

We have the scientific name as the common name for Sphagnum, Begonia, Rhododendron, Camellia, Magnolia (must be some more), but the only one I can think of where we use both generic, and specific, epithet as the common name is "Boa constrictor".

cheers Darrel

Ok, thanks, quite remarkable actualy i wonder what criterium is used to give a plant or take over a common name and the other not.. Thinking of it i first thought it could be only for plants that are not regionaly common not having (the need for) a common name.. But than there is the exotic Echinidorus that is named "Sword Plant" that actualy literaly translated also is the the common name for it in German as well as in Dutch.

Not that it is important, just trivial curiousity about linguistics.. Common names are distracting anyways since many different plants cary the same common name, such as Umbrella plant..

Sometimes common names if not refered to their growform can be historicaly interesting tho.. :) Like the Anagallis tenella's Germanic common name is still written in medieval spelling "Teer Guigheil", meaning the "Soft Madness Salvation".. In ancient times Germanic wich doctors believed it healed madness. Obviously it doesn't.. :rolleyes: Just a lovely story to tell when growing and showing it..
 
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Mick.Dk

Member
Joined
19 Jun 2012
Messages
1,516
Location
Dk
Another one :) Anubias sp. „Milky white”

View attachment 121482

From www.novina.pl
Just another 'variegata' sport of an Anubias barteri variation.
They are usually not stabile (=going back to green, when growing on) and the more white/yellow, the less prolific growers (=lack of capability to do photosynthesis) . Most such shoots are taken from all green plants, supporting these white parts - when broken off, these all white/yellow parts usually starve to death (unless they switch back to green form).
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
7,640
Location
Netherlands
Just another 'variegata' sport of an Anubias barteri variation.
They are usually not stabile (=going back to green, when growing on) and the more white/yellow, the less prolific growers (=lack of capability to do photosynthesis) . Most such shoots are taken from all green plants, supporting these white parts - when broken off, these all white/yellow parts usually starve to death (unless they switch back to green form).

Thus actualy, impressive looks and not worth the risk buying it for an probably exaggerated exclusive price.
 
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