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Planted Tank Newbie - Seeks advise for Shrimp Tank Plants.

Spartacus

Member
Joined
3 Aug 2012
Messages
102
Location
Scotland
Hello,

I would like o ask for some advise regarding planting up my 60L shrimp tank.

I am doing a complete rescape due to failed attempts.

Am trying to get the tank to be as simple and balanced as possible in the past I had problems with algae and dosed liquid carbon and things didn't end well so I and determined to try and avoid such issues that lead o coming home to remove dead shrimp.

Will be using inert black gravel and probably Tropica plant Growth Substrate.

Here is an idea of the hardscape:

photo99.jpg


I have a bottle of Tropica Premium Plant Fert but wondering if I should also invest in a bottle of the Specialised for use with the following:

(Trying to achieve a range of colours)

Eleocharis SP (Used to the rear to give height two clumps left and right corners)
Ammania Sp Bonsai (I like the look of this plant but it falls under the medium difficulty category)
Hottonia Palustris
Ludwiga Repens Rubin
Staurogyne Repens
Some form of Anubias
Christmas Moss for the redmoor to create a "tree"
HC Cuba for the carpet (I like the look of the dwarf baby tears but it falls under the advanced category?)

In the past I have tried to grow dwarf hairgrass and Fissidens with no suces I think what I did wrong is not have enough plants and the algae took over then I lost the battle.

So I am trying to go for a high density planted mass this time around and avoid my mistakes.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Nothing would make me happier for this to work out :)

Best wishes,

Murray
 

sa80mark

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Joined
2 Oct 2007
Messages
859
Location
Leicester
Hi murray I to consider myself a newbie to planted tanks I think you are going to be heading for problems again, if your wanting a simple tank id be looking at low tech, some of the plants listed such as the hc are imo only really suited to high tech and require plenty of co2, you dont mention if you will be dosing either liquid carbon or pressurised co2 but to me as a general rule if your wanting to avoid these then 99% of carpet plants are out, someone much more knowledgeable will be able to advise you better than me but I would look into low tech shrimp tanks and go from there, some moses and plants like java fern along with many others are much better suited to easier shrimp tanks

Mark
 

stu_

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Joined
9 Nov 2011
Messages
554
Location
Gloucester
Hi
My first question would be what sort of lighting you'd be using?
IMHO when you first start out at this, keeping the lighting at lower intensity, good plant mass, and regular tank maintenance goes a long way to keeping you algae free.
 

Spartacus

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Thread starter
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3 Aug 2012
Messages
102
Location
Scotland
Hi guys thanks for the input.

II did wonder about the HC - falling under the advanced category should have rung alarm bells. I do have a bottle of liquid carbon but tbh would rather just keep it simple (Bought it in my war against algae) Will need to research carpet / non carpet options :)

Lighting consists of 2x 11w on timer.

Will have a look around :)

Best wishes,

Murray
 

Manrock

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Joined
15 Dec 2007
Messages
225
I agree with the above. I run a small shrimp tank in my class at school and have no CO2 at all, not even liquid (I think it may be harmful to some inverts IMHO). You could look at low light plants and I've achieved a carpet using a plant that I can't find the name of! It grows really well in low-med light, no CO2. I'll post a pic if you're interested. I use crypts, dwarf sag, jave fern, moss and H. Japan with good results. Plus with low tech you can leave it alone for ages, no maintenance required! I haven't had to clean the glass for 4 months. Hope that helps.

Cheers
 

Lindy

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29 Jun 2012
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2,823
Location
Ayrshire, Scotland
You could try just using one of your lights at first to give your plants a chance to get going, you might find you don't need the second one at all. I don't have co2 or ferts in my shrimp tank but did use ADA Amazonia to allow me to grow lilaeopsis mauritiana. saggitaria platyphila and hygrophila pinnatifida (prob all spelt wrong) plus had the benefit of the ph buffering. Cherries ideally like a higher ph than crystal shrimp so it might not be good option for you if cherries are the goal. I use a Beamworks led purchased from aquaman on ebay and don't get algae apart from a little bba on the wood that rises up through suface of the water and is closest to light.
 

dw1305

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7 Apr 2008
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nr Bath
Hi all,
I'd definitely agree with "Manrock", lots of plants and low tech. is a good way to go with shrimps. I like some dead structural leaves, lots of moss (Java is ideal), Anubias, any Java Fern, Cryptocoryne, a couple of fine leaved plants (I use Cabomba caroliniana) and some floaters with good roots. If it will grow for you Pistia stratiotes is the best floater for shrimp friendly roots, but Salvinia or Limnobium will do. I really like Bolbitis heudelotii as a low tech plant, it grows quite quickly once you have a "critical mass", but takes a bit of time to get there low tech.

The more complex structure you have the better the shrimps do. Other than that I'd keep an eye out for Hydra and Planaria, and make sure the shrimps get a largely vegetarian diet

I've always got spare plants, leaves, moss etc. and I can send you a "starter pack" for P&P (as postage is now so expensive).

cheers Darrel
 

Manrock

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15 Dec 2007
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225
Other than that I'd keep an eye out for Hydra and Planaria, and make sure the shrimps get a largely vegetarian diet

Sorry to jump in here but...I've got planaria in the school tank (despite microwaving the substrate at last rescape). They don't seem to bother either the Ramshorns or Cherry Reds but I can't be sure. How do you get rid of them?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
.I've got planaria in the school tank (despite microwaving the substrate at last rescape). They don't seem to bother either the Ramshorns or Cherry Reds but I can't be sure. How do you get rid of them?
I always have some Planaria and some of the tanks have Hydra and small Leeches as well. My suspicion is that most established tanks have them, unless people are very careful to quarantine any new plants.

They are all predatory to some degree. Hydra are encouraged by feeding small live food items and I use a lot of Daphnia, micro-worms etc.

You can control all of them with pesticides, but there are cultural methods that you can use to reduce their number. Baiting is very successful for Planaria and Leeches, a prawn or piece of fish is placed in a bottle trap or net, and then a couple of hours after lights out removed. You can also provide suitable refuges for Planaria and leeches, a small tile placed on the bottom, with a very narrow gap underneath will accumulate Leeches and Planaria on their under-side, these can be removed during the day, and the resting animals rinsed off.

Hydra are more problematic, some fish eat Hydra, so far I've confirmed that Dwarf Sparkling Gourami (Trichopsis pumila) isn't one of them, although they will eat your shrimps. "Panacur" (Fenbendazole) is probably the best bet for these, and will also kill Planaria: <Killing Planaria and Hydra .:. Information on killing Planaria & Hydra with Fenbendazole>.

cheers Darrel
 

Spartacus

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3 Aug 2012
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Scotland
Hello folks,

Firstly many thanks indeed for taking the time out of your day to offer advice - Very much appreciated! :)

I have had a look around and taken the advice onboard coming up with a revised but still not final list. The tank does not have alot of floor space as such with the rocks and wood but there are various nooks and crannies I can plant up.

Here is the list thus far (input as always most welcomed)

Echinodorus impaii
Eleocharis sp

Christmas Moss
Cryptocoryne wendtii brown
Eleocharis sp. 'mini'
Echinodorus rose
Hottonia palustris
Ludwigia repens 'Rubin'
Amazon Forgot

I will do more research for another kind of moss - We had Java moss in a tank and it was pretty intrusive to say the least.

Many Thanks again!

Murray
 

Lindy

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Location
Ayrshire, Scotland
Fissidens grows well low tech and not invasive. Round pelia is fantastic for shrimp and also grows low tech.
 

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