plants for soft water

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by Lozbug, 15 Oct 2007.

  1. Lozbug

    Lozbug Member

    Messages:
    211
    I’ve had a peruse through 'plantsalive' trying to find plants suitable for soft water. Matt recommended crypt’s (I think it was?) so any other recommendations?

    Ta.v.much

    L
     
  2. Ed Seeley

    Ed Seeley Member

    Messages:
    3,262
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Aside from Vallis and Elodea/Egeria I don't think there's much that won't thrive in soft water! I have lots of Swords, crypts, Nymphaea/Nuphar, Java ferns and various mosses all thriving in very soft water. As for stems I find Rotala wallichi, Myaca and cabomba thrive, but I'm sure most stems would too, I'm just not that interested in them, too much work!
     
  3. Dave Spencer

    Dave Spencer Member

    Messages:
    1,389
    Location:
    N. Wales
    I have very soft water and have grown quite a few different types of plants. I haven`t yet come across a stem that hasn`t thrived in my soft water.

    I did struggle with Vallis at first, but it did adapt and start to show really good growth.

    Dave.
     
  4. Lozbug

    Lozbug Member

    Messages:
    211
    Yeh vallis was the main one I kept trying and failing with (least I know why now!) George said about adding bicarb. I’ve not done this before, but can do.... and may try in just a plant set-up, no fish, just till I’m comfortable with adding things lol

    But I reckon id rather just have suited plants. Thinking it maybe easier just have a list of 'non suitable' hehe.

    Well, thanks guys! I shall keep on deciding what i'm after - like a child in a sweet shop this!
    :)
     
  5. andy

    andy Member

    Messages:
    261
    Location:
    Lewes, East Sussex
    It would obviously depend on what your lighting is, whether CO2 was added and what substrate you have but i would suggest rotala indica, hetranthera zosterifolia, crypts, and maybe worth trying some blyxa japonica.

    Andy
     
  6. George Farmer

    George Farmer Founder Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,089
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Light and nutrients are more important than hardness.

    Concentrate on these and you'll be able to grow almost anything.
     

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