Plants Inbound - Emerse or Submerse?

Von Bronze

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Hello,

I've got a shipment of plants arriving any day now and I'm realising I've jumped the gun a little. I'm slightly under-researched and running a bit short of time. Something came up and it's unlikely I'll have the hardscape ready as planned.

As a stop-gap for a week or so I was going to start the DSM process in a clear plastic box under the aquarium light and transfer when ready.

The drystart method seemed quite straightforward. And the videos of course demonstrate great results. However, I was reading today that some plants don't perform so well under dry start conditions, may grow structurally differently, and apparently HC in particular can be quite prone rot/mould.

As far as I'm aware the list below are suitable for growing emersed. However does anyone know if any are going to struggle? The other option (if necessary) would be to submerse some in a vase/bowl with small amounts of Co2 injected.

Mosses
Riccardia sp. "chamedryfolia" - in Vitro
Riccia fluitans - in Vitro
Vesicularia ferriei 'Weeping Moss' - in Vitro
Fissidens fontanus "Phoenix Moss" - Pad

Carpet
Hemianthus callitrichoides "Cuba" - in-vitro
Marsilea hirsuta - in-vitro
Micranthemum tweediei "Monte carlo" - pot

Other
Hydrocotyle verticillata - pot
Bucephalandra sp. "Mini Catherinae" - pot

Any advice would be really appreciated. If they all turn to mush this will be a costly mistake! :eek:
 

jkh13

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I tried HC dry start but it melted on me. My mistake was using aquasoil in the dry start, the nutrients in the soil melted the HC, don't make the same mistake of using aquasoil.
 

Edvet

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In vitro: just leave the pots closed and put them somewhere cool
All the pots: have them in standing water in a closed container, feet wet, high humidity ( most will be grown this way anyway)
 

Zeus.

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In vitro: just leave the pots closed and put them somewhere cool
All the pots: have them in standing water in a closed container, feet wet, high humidity ( most will be grown this way anyway)

well thanks how they have the bulk of their plants at Aquarium Gardens in the back - some have fans on the containers others dont
 

Von Bronze

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Thank you!

For now, I've popped the pots in a covered casserole dish in just under a cm of RO water given them a spray and left the rest alongside. I'll leave them in the coolest spot I can find in low indirect light.

The Hydrocotyle verticillata was flowering so I've pruned those off so it can put it's energy into surviving the days ahead. :)

Cheers!

DSC02979.JPG
DSC02980.JPG
 

alto

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The 1-2-Grow and portions are best stored at @ 16C, indirect (rather dim) light - though if you’re certain of the 1 week delay, and the cups are not already grown in, you can place in somewhat higher light so they fill in - this is assuming intact containers

I’d not store that moss sideways

I’d also add a bit of paper or similar to that casserole top to disrupt the seal and allow air circulation

Nice flowers!
 

Mick.Dk

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I assume the quadangular container (stored sideways - I would'nt either) is the Fissidens. The lid of this is not sealed anyway, so this moss would really benefit from a spray once a day or every other day, to not dry out too much.
For the "caserole set-up", it would defenitely be necessary to ensure a bit of "air-exchange" in there. The paper added to top will help - but if you have the opportunity, lift off the entire lid every day, for a few minutes - and replace it. The humidity will then drop, but quickly get back to what it was before ventilation when you replace lid. This will prevent most fungi spores (allways around!!) from germinating and possibly destroying your plants.
1-2-Grow! cups are best stored at "lower temp. " (16 celcius is fine) and low, indirect light. This way the plants will "go to sleep", not using energy, patiently waiting for better times.
 

Von Bronze

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Sorry for my slow reply - But just to say thank you for the advice! I did take note, levelled the fissidens and eventually got them planted in a flurry.

There was a bit of decay beginning on the monte carlo - may have started in transit - there was a slight composty smell to them intially. However removed that section, washed it and there was plenty of healthy plant!
 

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