Positioning an even bigger tank...floor ok?

Discussion in 'General Planted Tank Discussions' started by sanj, 7 Jan 2010.

  1. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Hello,

    I actually posted somthing on tanks on wooden floors early in 2008 when I was looking to upgrade to an 800+ litre (96x24x24) aquarium.

    Ehem, well now im thinking of a 1,500 litre in acrylic (like those lovely tanks in the Greenmachine)it would be 96"x36"x28"h.

    Am i mad? Everyone else thinks so, I dont have any real aquarium hobyist friends :( ...they just dont get it.

    Anyway the concern again is the floor, but especially because this is going to be somthing like 2 tonnes when filled.

    I have wooden joist floors (Yikes!), but the only reason i am considering this (incl my present 8fter) is becuase the middle of the room has two walls where joists cross over and are supported. My living room was once two rooms and these walls would have supported stairs and the upstairs.

    Thoughts though, is it adequate support? Joists (the ones i can see, appear healthy). 2x6 (doubled up).

    I have a picture that i could upload, but I cannot see the option to upload?
     
  2. Dolly Sprint 16v

    Dolly Sprint 16v Member

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    See attached thread for up loading pictures.
    viewtopic.php?f=10&t=9266#p99696

    Regards
    paul.
     
  3. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Thanks Paul

    Aquariumplan.jpg
     
  4. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Oh its a small image, but you can get the impression.
     
  5. jarthel

    jarthel Member

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    1500L liter tank + stand + substrate + accessories (filters, co2 tank and etc) would be close to a mazda 6 in weight :) would you park a mazda 6 inside your house by checking a discussion forum? why not ask a pro? it's an expensive mistake if that floor give away :)
     
  6. Mark Webb

    Mark Webb Member

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    Personally I wouldn't risk it. Imagine 1½ tons of water in your living room. :crazy:

    I have a 1000 litre 72x30x30" on wooden joists, but i did belt and braces with steel reinforced concrete.

    Here's what I did.....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Hi, yes it is alot of weight, but the anology is not quite right. Bearing walls have to support a house which is much heavier than a car and my idea is to have the tank laying over the walls. You are right though ultimately someone who is an expert in this kind of thing is can make the final decision. However I do not think it is miss placed to ask peoples advise on a forum where several other people may have found themselves in similar situations.

    Mark, are you the guy who built his own aquarium? i was looking for the journal I cant remeber if it was you or not, but thanks for the link. I cant quite see it right now as my place of work blocks access to certain things. I will look at it when i get home.

    Thanks

    Sanj
     
  8. chilled84

    chilled84 Member

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    I would like to see that journall too! :D
     
  9. Mark Webb

    Mark Webb Member

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    Sanj, No I didn't build myself.
     
  10. AdAndrews

    AdAndrews Member

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    geez, and to think i worry about my 125litre upstairs on wooden joists :lol:

    I would go with what others have said, thats a hell of alot of weight, it could bring your whole house down
     
  11. OllieNZ

    OllieNZ Member

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    Hi All

    Hope this helps, its an article written by an American structural engineer and fishkeeper.
    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/aquarium_weight.php
    At the end of the day it is still a good idea to take the problem to a structural engineer for a definite yes or no and ideas to strengthen the structure if needed

    Regards

    Ollie
     
  12. squiggley

    squiggley Member

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    Same here with my 155l, I would be a bit more confident if they were the solid wood beams but as this is a new build the beams are made from OSB board in a "capital I" shape.
     
  13. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Hello again Mark,

    thanks for posting those photos. In the first one did you place those beams there? I did not think joists where laid like that. Was the ground originally that shallow or is this after putting concrete in? I cant quite tell.

    Thanks
     
  14. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Think you are right. It is alittle bit confusing who exactly to consuly, sone say qualified registered builder, some say bulding surveyor and then structural engineer. Structural engineer come bulder would be great. Or even Aquarist-builder-structural engineer who has done it before. lol
     
  15. OllieNZ

    OllieNZ Member

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    An engineer would be the best as they have the specialist kowledge to work out loadings, reinforcements needed etc.
    If you're investing in a tank this big a little bit more money consulting an engineer would be better than a tank sized hole in your living room floor lol.
     
  16. Garuf

    Garuf Member

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    If you know any architecture students they can do the maths, I threw my notes when I left the course on how to work it out otherwise I'd do it for you, It's first year stuff, all to do with point loads and integeral stresses.
     
  17. Mark Webb

    Mark Webb Member

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    Hi sanj, I didn't place the beams, thats how they were when we exposed them. That shot shows it how it was with no work. I just consulted a good experienced builder. I think as long as you have a fairly solid base to work with, give it a good 12" thickness of concrete and drive steel rods into the ground with cross rods tied in to the uprights to give you a steel box of rods within the concrete, you wont go far wrong.
     
  18. sanj

    sanj Member

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    Morning Mark,

    i see now. It seems your floor was originally more shallow than mine. I have 1 metre from floor boards to the floor. I have been talking with my father who is a design engineer and his initial thoughts are that my floor will be strong enough. However next port of call is he is going to consult some structural engineering contacts and also do some more detailed calcs himself. Failing that i will have to get some consultation myself.

    Thanks all.
     

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