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Producing CO2 in a propogator without using pressurised gas.

Steve Smith

Member
Joined
19 Jul 2007
Messages
4,421
Location
Leamington Spa, UK.
Hey guys. I just stumbled on an idea which I may be tempted to try out if I have the time. I've read here that you can use peat in the substrate of your propogator which produces CO2 as it decomposes. I thought it was quite an interesting idea!

After a very brief search, I found this PDF document. I've not read it TBH, just the overview, but it suggests that CO2 production is best at about 85% humidity.

The only thing I'm not so sure about is the smell it'll no doubt produce :lol:

I thought it was an interesting topic, seeing as some of us are starting to get into this emerse lark (I got mine setup over the weekend!)
 

a1Matt

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Joined
10 Mar 2008
Messages
2,497
Location
Bromley
Interesting.

Diana Walstad's low tech soil under substrate method claims that CO2 is produced by the soil. (She also mentions not having too much movement at the water surface, or you gas off the CO2 that is created.)

Sounds like the same theory to me here. So I guess that theory holds up for other soils (EDIT - most soils maybe? or just 'decomposing' stuff like leaf mulch, etc. watch out Steve we might be turning into gardeners :lol: ) and not just peat. Which is good, as peat is not very in fashion at the moment (peat bogs being endangered and whatnot).
 

a1Matt

Member
Joined
10 Mar 2008
Messages
2,497
Location
Bromley
As Steve Pushak is sealing the lid this will give 100% humidity, I think that will work with some species but not others.
I have fittonia's in my emmersed setup that start rotting when the humidity is too high.
HC on the other hand loves it.

From reading aorund another thing about sealing the lid is that you have to be really careful 1/ not to overwater (literally just put a dribble of water in) or things can go mouldy real quick. 2/ do not let it overheat.

I'd prefer to have some ventilation and lose the CO2, seems less risky.

All good food for thought though :)
 
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