Regulating co2 working pressure

Romeo

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9 May 2020
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I am hoping someone can assist with the following problem.



First of all, I am very new to this, so I could be doing something very simple wrong.



I recently bought a CO2 art regulator, and I am having a very difficult time using the working pressure knob – notably reducing the pressure to an acceptable level (~30 – 40 psi).

Here is the issue:

(1) As soon as I reduce the bubble count down (trying to start at 1 bubble per second) the working pressure increases to over 60 psi;

(2) I have release the working pressure knob as far as it can go, but it has no effect.

I have watched numerous videos and read all the questions and answers on the CO2 art site. I have attempted the following:

(1) The CO2 art website simply recommends releasing the working pressure by removing the bubble counter and opening the needle valve. Of course this works as all built up pressure is removed from the chamber. However, it doesn’t resolve the issue that as soon as I tighten the needle valve, and reduce the bubble count again, the pressure simply goes straight back to over 60 psi.

(2) Other video tutorials have stated to always ensure the working pressure knob and needle valve is open when you first release gas from the canister. Ironically, other videos say the complete opposite, and to ensure the working pressure knob and needle valve is firmly shut. Disregarding the conflicting information, I have tried both with nil effect.

In summary, has anyone had the same issue?



In theory it makes sense that as soon as you tighten the needle valve (restrict the outflow of CO2) the working pressure reading would increase. What I don’t understand is how you maintain a low bubble count with also an acceptable working pressure reading.



This is truly doing my head in.



I would greatly appreciate any assistance.
 

Zeus.

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Yorkshire,UK
Unscrew the working pressure knob- so effectively zero working pressure, soleniod open
as long as needle valve is letting some CO2 though the working pressure will drop to Zero.

Then slowly increase working pressure to say 35psi with solenoid open and needle valve slightly open, once stale it should be fine, you will get a slight increase in working pressure when solenoid value closes but not 60psi
 

Romeo

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9 May 2020
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How long should it take to drop to zero?

is that dependent on the bubble count/how far open the needle valve is?

I have followed the above steps and as soon as I try to reduce the outflow it pushes the working pressure over 60psi.
 

Heavenly

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20 Apr 2020
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Kent
I keep struggling reading posts like this, as CO2Art are adamant their regulators are capped at 40psi.
They agreed last last night to build me one and send out that will go to 50 psi for some issues I have to try as their range won’t go above 40 psi?
And your hitting 60, which would be great for me, but obviously your having issues...
 

Romeo

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I have no idea what is going on.

I have never seen anything that states they have a max working pressure of 40 though.

I am pretty much convinced the working pressure is faulty.

The only way I can have the working pressure below 60 is to have the needle valve releasing an inordinate amount of gas.

Considering the adoring fans, I have not been impressed at all with co2art.

First off was the needle valve was so tight that I needed to use pliers just to shut off supply.

Now, what appears to be a non functioning working pressure knob.

I don’t know what else it could be - I am unable to have a reasonable bubble count with working pressure below 60.
 

Majsa

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26 Apr 2017
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The Netherlands
How long should it take to drop to zero?

is that dependent on the bubble count/how far open the needle valve is?
It takes a while, but goes quite fast if the needle valve is well open (I also opened the top part of the bubble counter). For me it still took quite a while for the last 5 or so psi.

Have you contacted CO2Art and if so, what did they say?
 

Nick72

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21 Apr 2020
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172
Location
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
I keep struggling reading posts like this, as CO2Art are adamant their regulators are capped at 40psi.
They agreed last last night to build me one and send out that will go to 50 psi for some issues I have to try as their range won’t go above 40 psi?
And your hitting 60, which would be great for me, but obviously your having issues...
From the C02 Arts website:

Pro-SE
  • Adjustable working pressure up to +/- 40PSI (3 BAR) which makes excellent product for both Tropical and Marine Aquariums.
Pro Elite
  • Adjustable working pressure up to 5 bar
 

Heavenly

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20 Apr 2020
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Location
Kent
Yea I was informed both were 40 by CO2Art on email but can see this is not the case. I think most people buy the Pro SE capped at 40 psi.
 

Zeus.

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1 Oct 2016
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Yorkshire,UK
I've got the pro elite and a second hand std single stage. The later is fixed psi but works fine
 

Romeo

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9 May 2020
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Location
Chicago
Co2 art have been quite doubtful of my claims. To be honest they have made me feel like I am making up the claims, with comments like it’s very, very unusual.
I keep struggling reading posts like this, as CO2Art are adamant their regulators are capped at 40psi.
They agreed last last night to build me one and send out that will go to 50 psi for some issues I have to try as their range won’t go above 40 psi?
And your hitting 60, which would be great for me, but obviously your having issues...
You can easily increase your default working pressure beyond 40. All you need to do is unscrew the back of the regulator - inside is the springs for the first stage regulator. To increase your standard working pressure - simply extend the spring slightly. By doing so will increase pressure on the first stage diaphragm increasing the default working pressure above 40. Similarly, the working pressure can be reduced by simply compressing the spring slightly.
 

Romeo

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9 May 2020
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Location
Chicago
Thank you all.
In the end the reason for the fault was not obtained from co2art who simply maintained there was no fault - but through a YouTube video on scuba diving equipment and dual stage regulators.

Turns out there were two things causing my problems.

Firstly, the spring within the first stage regulator was too long or over extended. This was causing my default working pressure to climb over 60 psi. Given you are able to easily open the first stage regulator, I could easily rectify this by compressing the spring back to its proper length.

Secondly, the working pressure regulator - also had an over extended spring. As a result, even when I fully disengaged the spring it was still putting pressure on the working pressure diaphragm - compressing the valve. This is why I was unable to reduce the working pressure to zero. Unfortunately, I am not aware of an easy way to get access to the second stage spring. As a result, I can not shorten it and therefore enable me to remove all pressure off the diaphragm when completely off.

Despite this, the reduction in the default pressure from the first stage regulator has meant I am now able to maintain 1 bubble per second at a working pressure of 30 psi.

Anyway, thought that might interest people because I am sure I am not the only one who will experience this problem.

If the co2 art regulator I bought had both these issues, I am sure it would be a manufacturing fault that will affect a number of units sold recently.

Given that everyone raves about their regulators, I must be one unlucky person to get one with two faulty regulator springs, and a needle valve that required Arnie strength to turn to the off position.
 
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