Restoring an old forge - Photos.

Steve Smith

Member
Joined
19 Jul 2007
Messages
4,422
Location
Leamington Spa, UK.
I was helping my Sister and her partner cleaning out an old forge on Sunday, which he has just taken on. I took the opertunity to take some photos, as he want's to document the restorarion for a website he's setting up (he'll be doing this for a living eventually!) So a mix of general and artsy pics :) Comments/criticism welcome ;)

Right side - Forge 1:


Left side - Forge 2:


Work bench:


Random:






 

LondonDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
21 Feb 2008
Messages
10,565
Location
London
Really good photos mate, like the artistic side of them and the angles and composition are great too :)
Congrats
 

ceg4048

Expert/Global Moderator
Staff member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
8,955
Location
Chicago, USA
Steve,
Photo 1 suffers from poor cropping technique as you have blown out the highlights at the left side window pane and there is lost detail on the table immediately beneath that window. So that should have been fixed either by cropping, by recomposition or by pre/post processing exposure adjustment. It's a cardinal sin to blow out highlights at a peripheral section of the composition because it tends to draw the eye away from the main composition, kind of like having a bleach stain on your best shirt. You could have also done a better job of arranging those poles to accentuate height, maybe placing them together or angling them towards/away from each other at the top to accentuate the "A" frame shapes of the timbers and roof line.

A similar situation occurs in Photo 2, this time on the right hand side. You could play with losing the right 1/3 of the frame or at least do something interesting with the bricks on that table. You have also lost detail in the left side wall so an exposure compensation should have been made here. Another interesting thing you can do if you have remote lighting would be to illuminate the insides of those ovens/fireplaces. even an incandescent light or well plased torch would give a nice effect and greater interest (something to consider for future shots I guess).

Photo 3 does a better job compositionally as the washed out details in the window panes is actually interesting as it provides a white backdrop to the vertical/horizontal frame pattern, but it could do with a 1/2 stop or so adjustment. You'd have to play with it to avoid losing too much detail in the shadows below. Again, I would have moved the light colored objects to the darker areas and the dark bricks to the lighter areas to create more contrast and interest. This would do well in monochrome.

Photo 4 is OK except you broke cardinal rule number 2 by having out of focus data in the foreground. This also can be very distracting but at least it has pleasant bokeh. This might have been mitigated by stopping down to get better depth of field.

You can see how much more pleasing Photo 5 is compared to Photo 1 when that blown highlight is out of the frame. The exposure is more reasonable although it could be dialed down some more. The person's back and hair is starting to wash out. I'd probably crop out the left third in this shot to shift the focus of the composition to the person framed by the door and ceiling.

I like Photo 6 except, again, you've blown highlights against the wall. Another excellent candidate for monochrome. Is that a particle beam generator mounted on the left wall? if you monochrome the shot it doesn't stand out so much - or recompose. Not sure what equipment you're using so it's unclear what kind of control you have over exposure, but it's a definite weakness in these shots. 8)

Err..not sure what to make of that final shot mate. Could be sheer genius in the impressionist mold....or not. :D
Cheers,
 

Superman

Member
Joined
29 Jan 2008
Messages
1,804
Location
Cheltenham
I wish I knew half of the stuff Clive is talking about.
Other than taking photos of my tank, I'm still point and click.
 

ceg4048

Expert/Global Moderator
Staff member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
8,955
Location
Chicago, USA
Err....Clark check this page. Almost any selection you make will be a winner but item 8 used is a good buy:
Amazon.co.uk Ansel Adams Books

Item 3. "The Negative" explains The Zonal System, upon which just about every modern camera's metering system is based.

Cheers,
 

Steve Smith

Member
Joined
19 Jul 2007
Messages
4,422
Location
Leamington Spa, UK.
Thanks for the replies guys :)

Clive, I'll digest your suggestions when I've got time to read them fully (at work at the mo) and go back to the RAW files and have a play about :) As for composition, I was pretty much snapping pics without moving anything. Things are lying as they were, and as they'd been placed buy whoever was tidying/cleaning. If I'd of had time it might of been nice to arrange some stuff but it didn't occur to me at the time :rolleyes: Also, the room was full of soot and dust in the air :lol:

I'll post some re-edited photos using some of Clive's suggestions in the near future :)
 

Dan Walter

Member
Joined
18 Mar 2009
Messages
166
Location
Salisbury, Wiltshire
Looks like an interesting project Steve, I wish I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to get involved in a similar restoration. It really makes me wonder where people find these types of projects!?

Photo's are pretty good, much better than my shakey hands could take.. i guess practise makes perfect ;)

Dan
 

Mark Evans

Expert
Joined
13 Jun 2008
Messages
6,486
Location
newark notts.
for the reason's clive speaks about (blown highlights) this is why i shoot up to 2 stops under exposure in RAW.

it's fatal to try and get a correct exposure, you'll be there forever trying to get it. even at 2 stops under, you'll never loose detail in the shadow areas.
 

Steve Smith

Member
Joined
19 Jul 2007
Messages
4,422
Location
Leamington Spa, UK.
Thanks :)

I think some of this is down to viewing it on different monitors and such. I noticed when I looked at the photos on my laptop at home the first one looked a little bright. I must read up on monitor calibration and all that stuff at some point :)
 

ceg4048

Expert/Global Moderator
Staff member
Joined
11 Jul 2007
Messages
8,955
Location
Chicago, USA
saintly said:
aaronnorth said:
whenever i underexpose and edit it, noise always appears :rolleyes:
it's only advisable with RAW files. if you do it with jpegs you'll suffer noise i'm afraid
I reckon that's a function of that particular camera sensor as well as it's jpg algorithms. It also depends on whether you select jpg basic versus jpg fine, or if you select a low file size jpg setting. ISO settings also play a role, higher ISO=higher noise. I shoot -2 to -3 stops exclusively in jpg and I don't suffer this, neither in the deep blacks, midtones nor in the highlights. 8)

Cheers,
 

Mark Evans

Expert
Joined
13 Jun 2008
Messages
6,486
Location
newark notts.
true Clive, ISO is key to what you've just explained. Also though, remember the data you've got with a JPEG is compressed, but you do have the option of how much compression you give it....low medium high quality.

RAW is the basic unaffected/uncompressed file, hence the ability to "play" more with a file. but as Clive says, if you choose everything correctly, you'll capture a good image with J-peg, but for me I'd rather not worry about certain parameters and worry about that later, knowing i have the image in RAW

i suppose....in a strange kinda way, a bit like EI dose more....worry less :D

but as Clive suggests, for jpeg shooters, choose the lowest ISO you can get away with and highest jpeg setting your card will allow (without you being limited to the amount of shots you can take in a time span) you'll do good.

goodness i shot jpeg for an age, it's just that RAW gives you more....tons more! for me RAW, is clives CO2 8)...thats how good RAW is ;)
 

Steve Smith

Member
Joined
19 Jul 2007
Messages
4,422
Location
Leamington Spa, UK.
I always shoot in RAW :) I usually use full manual, just to force myself to play with settings, but most of these were shot on semi-auto RAW to be honest, and then I've played about with levels and such in RAWShooter Essentials 2005 :)
 
Top