Rotala Indica and Rotala Ammania Bonsai - are they the same plant?

Mick.Dk

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An important thing to remember:
The in-vitro version of a plant is genetically still exactly the same...... meaning the plant does not get more/less easy/difficult to grow. An "easy" plant is still easy and a "difficult" plant is still difficult. The general behaviour, adaptability and growth habits are not changed. This may be obvious, but I hear quite a lot of people somehow think the 1-2-Grow! product will guarantee success on the more difficult plants! A little simplified you can say, that buying in-vitro plants, you are buying "potential", buying potted plants, you get what you see. After that it is your skills, that will bring you success or failure (I really consider a well-functioning aquarium allmost totally a matter of skills! Somehow "luck" has a habit of following knowledge and experience!!)
There are pro's and contra's on both products, really.
 

Mick.Dk

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If I can tap into your knowledge on this plant a little more then please Mick - what is the appropriate way of planting the in-vitro version of this plant?

I note it comes with roots on the stems. Should these be washed to remove the gel, and planted as is, or do the roots need removing?

Any other special considerations? I read a number of experiences online of this plant just melting away on people when planted from in-vitro - is that common?
The Rotala sp. 'bonzai' is in Tropica Medium category - so not as easy as Rotala rotundifolia, but defenitely not as difficult as Rotala macrandra, either.
The in-vitro product must be thoroughly washed, to remove as much as possible of gel/fluid. This gel/fluid may harm the plant, once planted in your tank, and it contain a lot of "chemistry", that you do not want in your tank. Should there be dead parts in the cup, those must be removed - nothing else. Divide the content into smaller portions, as you desire (can be divided into single stems, if you want), but it is not benefitial to plant large portions or the intire content undivided.
Be aware, that these plantlets are to be considered "babies". Since you removed their food resource (=the gel/fluid) and they have very little stored, you need to provide nutrients for them from very beginning, after planting (as opposed to potted plants, that have a lot of stored food, and will therefore tolerate neglect for several weeks). Besides this, it is really just a matter of providing what is described in Tropica Medium category and perform general aquarium maintainance.
Personally I have actually never experienced melt - neither by in-planting or later - from Rotala sp. 'bonzai'. I too have heard of it, though, and I consider it provoked, by some environmental conditions, not suitable for the plant.
 

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