Salvinia Cucullata

jameson_uk

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Came across some images of this floater in someone's tank (from US I think) and looked quite interesting.

Anyone have any experience if it and/or has seen it on sale?
 

jameson_uk

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dw1305

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Hi all,
Anyone have any experience if it and/or has seen it on sale?
A few years ago I bought some (from a well known auction site), but when it arrived it was Salvinia "auriculata group". I don't think it makes any difference in growth, but I already had (and still have) plenty of Salvinia auriculata.

Have a look at <"ID for Salvinia ...."> and linked threads.

cheers Darrel
 

jameson_uk

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Hi all, A few years ago I bought some (from a well known auction site), but when it arrived it was Salvinia "auriculata group". I don't think it makes any difference in growth, but I already had (and still have) plenty of Salvinia auriculata.

Have a look at <"ID for Salvinia ...."> and linked threads.

cheers Darrel
Not sure why that thread didn't come up when searching ....

I had some Salvinia Natans in my tank a while ago and that did really well. It seemed to cope better with the moisture from the lid and flow compared to my frogbit but it was a but small for my liking and I ended up taking it out.

Still trying to work out a balance of flow and floaters as with a spray bar along the back wall I end up with floaters squished up against the front glass.
 

zozo

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To develop that distinct cucullata cup shaped leaf it requires a lot of light and a lot of ferts. If it doesn't get it, it will look no different than Salvinia natans.

It will never realy grow the full potential and stay rather small in aqaurium conditions. It needs full sun and almost eutrophic water and high temperatur for that. The big specimen you find in the trade are imported plants from the tropics. Even nurseries in the northern hemisphere are not able to grow them to full potential. If you buy a full grown specimen and keep it outdoors in eutrophic conditions, a cool summer kills it, it will turn brown and wither away.
 
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jameson_uk

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To develop that distinct cucullata cup shaped leaf it requires a lot of light and a lot of ferts. If it doesn't get it, it will look no different than Salvinia natans.
Are the leaves (or whatever they are called on ferns) any bigger? I found the Salvinia Natans to be almost duckweed sized (and almost as rampant) thought the Cucullata leaves were a big bigger?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Are the leaves (or whatever they are called on ferns) any bigger? I found the Salvinia Natans to be almost duckweed sized (and almost as rampant) thought the Cucullata leaves were a big bigger?
I think a lot of it depends on growing conditions, a bit like with <"dwarf" Water Lettuce"> (Pistia stratiotes).

These are the same plant Salvinia "auriculata group "(from <"Utricularia gibba has flowered"> thread). My suspicion is that most of the Salvinia plants sold under different names are actually just different grwth forms of <"Salvinia "auriculata"> (with "egg whisk shaped hairs")

High light (Glasshouse in the summer)
salvinia_highlight-jpg.jpg


Low light (Aquarium)
salvinia-jpg.jpg


The plants will cycle from one condition to the other with changes in light and nutrient levels.

cheers Darrel
 

jameson_uk

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Do Salvinia species generally cope better with getting wet that other floaters? It has been a while since I had the Salvinia Natans but I seem to recall they didn't really mind getting water on the leaves where as the frogbit didn't cope well.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Do Salvinia species generally cope better with getting wet that other floaters?
They don't really get wet. It is one way of telling if your Salvinia plants are healthy or not. When they are in growth the leaves are super hydrophobic and the <"water just beads on top of the hairs"> (before being wicked away by the trichomes).

-on-water-The-leaf-surface-is-densely-covered-with.png


The process is actually called the <"Salvinia effect">.
The "Salvinia effect" describes the stabilization of an air layer upon a submerged hydrophobic (water repellent) surface by hydrophilic (water loving) pins. This physic-chemical phenomenon was discovered on the floating fern Salvinia molesta by the botanist Wilhelm Barthlott (Universität Bonn) while working on the Lotus effect and was described in cooperation with the physicist Thomas Schimmel (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie), fluid mechanist Alfred Leder (Universität Rostock) and their colleagues in 2010.
cheers Darrel
 

jameson_uk

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So it turned up looking reasonably OK
MVIMG_20190418_113026.jpg

It is certainly very different to the Salvinia Natans I had before (that was much more akin to Duckweed.

Also bought some red root floaters which I fully expect to die off from what I have been reading about them but though it was worth a try. (Have also stuck a little of each in my shrimp tank so will see how that goes).
MVIMG_20190418_115316.jpg
 

dw1305

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jameson_uk

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Hi all, That looks like it might be the real thing. You need to have a look at the <"hairs (trichomes) on the leaf surface">, in S. cucullata they are simple (the end in a point).
I had a quick look and couldn't see with my eyes. Will see if I can dig out the magnifying glass later.
I had just removed quite a bit of unhealthy looking plants :p I think this is mainly from it being squished up against the front glass after I increased the surface agitation a little while ago (in an attempt to help out some of my stems which were struggling a little). I really need to go back and visit my flow again :confused:
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I think this is mainly from it being squished up against the front glass after I increased the surface agitation a little while ago
That was the problem I had with Phyllanthus, it was always ending up submerged under the other floaters and eventually I stopped rescuing it.

cheers Darrel
 

jameson_uk

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I did try to get a look with a magnifying glass but I couldn't really tell and I certainly couldn't get a photo. I put the battery for the DSLR on charge but then promptly forgot.... Will see if I do remember tomorrow.

The Salvinia has something sprouting but doesn't look like anything I have seen online.

The red root floater has surprised me as from what I had read I assumed it would die off fairly quickly. Bits of it seemed to flourish and I have at least three times as much as I started with but bits that looked great suddenly went bad. I think this is down to getting wet (it moved from where it was originally when I did a water change and I think gets a bit more of a ride in the flow). Put a bit in my shrimp tank and that seems to be doing ok too.

ea6203ed7d93ca14307350a82557d793.jpg
8ddd35ffcaf3b4752468e87b5548c6e2.jpg
ed94f3bdf1a2f7763194a3c5b4042624.jpg
 

jameson_uk

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The Salvinia broke into three bits and seems to be growing new leafs (fonds?) that look a little different.

The redroot floater has not fared well. Not sure if it is flow or moisture but the where I did have a few big chains in now have a lot of unhealthy looking plants. I have moved them as I think they were getting pushed under water and then dying off.
667f64b386379ad8a730833b858d71b4.jpg
feb25b02970f27ee85faf72db8cce20c.jpg
a392a21cdcda4e36b236eabf82daba82.jpg
b454c47b47bfc7314ecd0e6b3b5529bd.jpg
 

jameson_uk

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Thanks

Hi all, It is either lower lights or lower nutrient levels or both.
Light is reasonably high (floaters were to shade some of the other plants). Have been considering upping the ferts as there are a few small issues here and there and plant mass has increased too.

It is a vascular plant seedling. Looks like it might be a Hygrophila sp.
I do have some Hyrophila Siamensis that is under where the Salvinia is. Thought it looked a bit odd! Is this type of propagation normal?
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Thought it looked a bit odd! Is this type of propagation normal?
Only if the Hygrophila flowers and sets seed. Almost certainly the seed would have dropped on to the Salvinia plant before it arrived with you.

<"Hygrophila spp. is just a guess">. Most <"Dicot"> seedlings look much a like, but, from the new leaves, your plant looks likely to be Lamiaceae (Dead Nettles etc) or Acanthaceae (Hygrophila etc.).

cheers Darrel
 
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