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Schismatoglottis prietoi 

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Anyone tried this plant? I just picked some up yesterday, it seems very similar to a crypt, though a lovely wavy leaf edge... I'll put a photo up after work.
 

Tim Harrison

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It's a nice looking plant Matt; a pic from the internet for now...

Schismatoglottis-prietoi.jpg
 

dw1305

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Mick.Dk

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Schismatoglottis prietoi is really, really an easy plant to grow. Appearance is somewhere between small crypt and Buceph.
It can grow in a "starter set" (= poor light, low dosing of ferts and no added CO2 ). It will be a bit leggy and not to its full potential, but still a nice and dense plant.
Given just a bit more light and ferts, but still without added CO2, it will develop a surprisingly dense, relatively low, crypt-like community of dark green, wavy-edged-leaved rosettes. After some time new, single plants can/will appear quite a distance away by undergravel runners.
As an extra info: it can actually be attached to a piece of lava-rock, sending roots downwords to bottom-layer and will look extraordinay this way. .... oh, and it will readily flower (typical aroid, not far from Bucephalandra) when grown emerse, but sometimes submerse, too.
Grown submerse any snail from miles around will, for some reason, feel obliged to dine heavily on this plant :(
 

Wookii

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Schismatoglottis prietoi is really, really an easy plant to grow. Appearance is somewhere between small crypt and Buceph.
It can grow in a "starter set" (= poor light, low dosing of ferts and no added CO2 ). It will be a bit leggy and not to its full potential, but still a nice and dense plant.
Given just a bit more light and ferts, but still without added CO2, it will develop a surprisingly dense, relatively low, crypt-like community of dark green, wavy-edged-leaved rosettes. After some time new, single plants can/will appear quite a distance away by undergravel runners.
As an extra info: it can actually be attached to a piece of lava-rock, sending roots downwords to bottom-layer and will look extraordinay this way. .... oh, and it will readily flower (typical aroid, not far from Bucephalandra) when grown emerse, but sometimes submerse, too.
Grown submerse any snail from miles around will, for some reason, feel obliged to dine heavily on this plant :(

Mick, can you (or anyone else) advise the best way to prune this plant. I started with a small one attached to some hardscape, and it’s now grown to monstrous (for my 60 litre tank) proportions.

upload_2020-4-23_17-25-57.jpeg


I can’t see an obvious way to tackle it without leaving numerous leafless stems.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
That looks great.
Mick, can you (or anyone else) advise the best way to prune this plant. I started with a small one attached to some hardscape, and it’s now grown to monstrous (for my 60 litre tank) proportions........I can’t see an obvious way to tackle it without leaving numerous leafless stems.
I wouldn't prune off individual leaves, I think your best bet is to split the rhizome into sections (ideally whole rosettes?), like you would with an Anubias or Bolbitis.

Just sort out the best division in terms of size and leaf growth and replant that.

If the divisions don't have an apical shoot then hopefully a dormant bud will grow out from a leaf axil, before all the existing leaves fall off.

I would guess there might be numerous takers for a rhizome section, I'd definitely buy one from you.

cheers Darrel
 

Wookii

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Hi all,
That looks great.I wouldn't prune off individual leaves, I think your best bet is to split the rhizome into sections (ideally whole rosettes?), like you would with an Anubias or Bolbitis.

Just sort out the best division in terms of size and leaf growth and replant that.

If the divisions don't have an apical shoot then hopefully a dormant bud will grow out from a leaf axil, before all the existing leaves fall off.

I would guess there might be numerous takers for a rhizome section, I'd definitely buy one from you.

cheers Darrel

Thanks Darrell, trouble is they’re so densely packed it’s difficult to see the wood for the trees. All the roots are extended all around the wood and hang down also (by design - it’s the effect I wanted), and the Fissidens has grown in amongst the roots also, so I’m loathed to try and pull the whole plant off the wood:

upload_2020-4-23_20-45-0.jpeg


I’ll have a go and see if I can manage to get the thing apart and tease off some rosettes in the next couple of days. If I can manage it, you will be most welcome to them free of charge given all the help you’ve given me on this forum!
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
All the roots are extended all around the wood and hang down also (by design - it’s the effect I wanted), and the Fissidens has grown in amongst the roots also, so I’m loathed to try and pull the whole plant off the wood:
It looks absolutely brilliant. I would possible approach it fairly carefully with a craft knife? and see if you could slice of some of the outer rosettes.
If I can manage it, you will be most welcome to them free of charge given all the help you’ve given me on this forum!
Thank you, that is a very kind offer.

cheers Darrel
 

papa_c

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I bought one that was similar looking, to separate it I just spilt it into half and I was able to see the individual plantlets. I ended up with about 20 small individual portions that have been planted up. Within a couple days they have started to throw up new leaves.
 

Mick.Dk

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Schismatoglottis prietoi is often forming very, very dense groups.
It can be torn apart by hand, though (takes some "feeling" and "courage" combined with determination and strength, admittedly). This is usually much less damaging than using a sharp tool. Like said above, the individual plants are much easier recognised after such a "tear-down" and can be split into single plants or smaller groups. Either way, they very readily set roots and grow on, when re-planted, if only some of the basis stem is still on the plantlet. Parts witout this basis must be considered lost.
 

Wookii

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Hi all, It looks absolutely brilliant. I would possible approach it fairly carefully with a craft knife? and see if you could slice of some of the outer rosettes.Thank you, that is a very kind offer.

cheers Darrel

Well, I tackled it tonight. As @Mick.Dk says above, it’s incredibly dense. I must have removed 2/3rd’s of the plant, and there’s still loads of leaves left, with masses of new leaf growth in the very centre.

upload_2020-4-24_20-14-5.jpeg


I did use a knife in the end to slice the rhizome, I wouldn’t have got them off without without wrecking the whole thing otherwise - they’re quite tough!

There are plenty of plantlets for you to try anyway Darrel, hopefully most of them will be viable, but I’ll send them all and you can pick and choose what to keep. PM your address and I’ll send them out on Monday for you (I’ll float them in the tank until then).

upload_2020-4-24_20-17-3.jpeg
 

Jayefc1

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It's a beautiful plant but I cant seem to get it to.grow just keeps shedding the leaves it's not planted as i hought you could use it like a epiphyte it doesn't get much light as its in between wood in lower level but has good flow and co2 been in the tank from the start about 10 weeks now still nothing from everything else.seems fine
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Just to thank @Wookii for sending me the spare plants, they arrived yesterday and were very healthy and beautifully packaged. Hopefully I'll manage not to kill them and I'll be able to spread them around the hobby.

Really interesting to look at "in the flesh", they look like a cross between Bucephalandra and Anubias, with a splash of <"Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia"> thrown in.

cheers Darrel
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Grown submerse any snail from miles around will, for some reason, feel obliged to dine heavily on this plant..... oh, and it will readily flower (typical aroid, not far from Bucephalandra) when grown emerse, but sometimes submerse, too.
The snails are still leaving to plants that @Wookii sent me alone, and one of them is about to flower. They are just about submersed, they are all unattached and lodged in the surface plant mass.
Hopefully I'll manage not to kill them and I'll be able to spread them around the hobby.
I've sent plants to @MirandaB and @Nick_593, and I've got a few more to post in the next few days now that Royal Mail looks a little more reliable.

cheers Darrel
 

Wookii

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Hi all, The snails are still leaving to plants that @Wookii sent me alone, and one of them is about to flower. I've sent plants to @MirandaB and @Nick_593, and I've got a few more to post in the next few days now that Royal Mail looks a little more reliable.

cheers Darrel

You've done better than me then Darrel, I've had no flowers as yet - must be your soft rain water - though continuing rampant growth. The plant I took the cutting from to send to you was back to the same size within a few weeks!

How have the plants grown in your low tech tanks?

Incidentally the snails don't touch mine either.
 
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