Single gauge regulator

hogan53

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I am looking for a single gauge regulator for disposable bottles any suggestions.
Also can you get a adapter to reverse a 22mm fitting to a disposable bottle connection.
hoggie
 

jonny_ftm

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Stop loosing money on crappy regulators. Any one didn't expierience end of canister life, CO2 dumping issues? Go with a dual stage (nothing to do with dual gauge) regulator, at least you'll have piece of mind
 

Mark Evans

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dual gauge regulators? or multi stage as there also known.

why do you need multi stage? i use multi stage at work (oxy/ acetylene not like industrial welding/cutting,more like detailed lead welding) all the second stage is give more accuracy over the already reduced pressure, nothing else so it flows smoother.

my use requires much more finesse than co2 being pumped into an aquarium. and IMO single stage is suffice. the one thing I'm guessing most of us don't do, is open the regulator control wide open and then close it again to stop it 'sticking' after long periods of time open. this can give problems. irreversible ones at that!

'proper' multi stage regulators are heavy too....and expensive. most of the ones we use must be single stage...there way too small.
 

jonny_ftm

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If you use a 10Kg CO2 canister, the time between when pressure starts to drop (end of liquid phase) and the time the canister is really empty can be of up to months depending on your bps. During that time, canister pressure drops and working pressure increases. Through the needle valve, an increase in working pressure by 0.1 bar can significantely increase the bps. On the best single stage regulators, you'll get 10-30% increase in working pressure, 30% being the most common for most cheap aquatic regulators, even the Dennerle and Tunze ones (tested). That's 0.6 bars for a set 2 bar working pressure.

Instead of looking daily at your pressures to avoid fish gasping at surface and having to correct pressure for weeks when canister empties, a dual stage regulator gives me peace of mind.
 

hogan53

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Hear Hear
Thank you.What this guy doesn't understand that space is a issue here.
As i already have a Dennerle regulator dual stage/multi stage/multi gage all the same to me.
I don't want to fork out another shed load of money again.Its my cash i can do what i like with it.
Anyway there is a regulator already on the Co2refillable bottle/cylinder/canister/ if I'm not mistaken.
Ive never found the empty/full gage that important on my Dennerle reg it usually hits the bottom very quickly.
And your correct about regulators sticking good advise.
Mine can become a tad stiff also.Will post a rundown on this reg,when delivered and i get it up and running.
hoggie
 

Mark Evans

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taken on board johnny,

actually i think there's some confusion here. maybe from me actually. I'm reading dual gauge as dual stage.

2 gauges of course give the reading from the bottle and the other is the outward pressure to the diffuser.

now my regs for oxygen, also have to gauges, but ore multi stage regulators, this is where my pressure is reduced twice for more accuracy, or a more controlled flow of gas. a single stage reg can have 2 gauges, but isn't dual stage.

getting confusing eh? :p
 

Mark Evans

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hogan53 said:
dual stage/multi stage/multi gage
there not the same matey, stage and gauge are 2 different things. hence why i re-read what i'd wrote. :D i miss read.

dual gauge, is 2 gauges. can still be single stage.

dual stage, is where the pressure is reduced twice. like i mentioned earlier, dual gauge regs are big for what ever app. :thumbup: IME of course.
 

Mark Evans

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each time a bottle empties, you must always wind it out then re set everything, other wise it can stick. i've gone through 2 regs for work by not doing this.
 

Mark Evans

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i've taken a quick snap of 3 regs,

co2, acetylene both single stage but dual gauge.

and to the right a multi stage reg, but still dual gauged. notice the size difference.

jonny_ftm said:
a dual stage regulator gives me peace of mind.
i'm guessing it isn't dual stage, but dual gauged.

IMG_1678-01.jpg


someone shoot me for no jubilee clips too. :lol:
 

hogan53

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Saintly nice one
There's no way these will go under my cupboard. :lol:
If a cylinder has a open/close valve and a reg has a open/close pressure gauge and a needle valve.
What category would you place this in.
hoggie
 

Mark Evans

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hogan53 said:
If a cylinder has a open/close valve and a reg has a open/close pressure gauge and a needle valve.
What category would you place this in.
i'm not really sure.

the cylinder open/close allows the gas to travel to the reduction stage, which diminishes the pressure to working values, the open/close pressure on the reg allows the gas to then travel to needle valve, this does not reduce the pressure anymore though.

multi stage, would have 2 reducers in the reg, hence it's size.
 

hogan53

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I would make it a single stage reg
If i kept the pressure lower would it be easier to regulate through a needle valve.
hoggie
 
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